Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegislation Indiana
IN THE NEWS

Legislation Indiana

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
State lawmakers handed a victory to anti-abortion interests Tuesday by deciding not to vote on repealing unenforceable criminal penalties for doctors who perform abortions. Abortion rights advocates had sought to wipe out the penalties, which were rendered unenforceable in 1973 by the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision, in case the court later reversed itself.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NATIONAL
February 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
With the stroke of a pen, Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels on Wednesday made his state the 23rd in the nation — and the only one in the Rust Belt — with a "right to work" law on its books. He also made Indiana the latest state in which Republicans have successfully pushed legislation that has angered unions and their traditional allies in the Democratic Party. Daniels signed the bill hours after the GOP-controlled state Senate passed it in a 28-22 vote; the new law allows workers to avoid paying dues even if the workplace has a union contract.
Advertisement
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Devout, conservative and heavily Republican, Utah lawmakers figured to be out front in the anti-abortion stampede that many activists not long ago were predicting might sweep through state legislatures this year. But by the time lawmakers recessed a few days ago, Republican Gov. Norman H. Bangerter, a staunch abortion foe himself, had talked them out of taking up a bill to outlaw most abortions. The reason: money.
NEWS
February 24, 1990 | BOB SECTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Devout, conservative and heavily Republican, Utah lawmakers figured to be out front in the anti-abortion stampede that many activists not long ago were predicting might sweep through state legislatures this year. But by the time lawmakers recessed a few days ago, Republican Gov. Norman H. Bangerter, a staunch abortion foe himself, had talked them out of taking up a bill to outlaw most abortions. The reason: money.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2012 | By Michael Muskal, Los Angeles Times
With the stroke of a pen, Indiana Gov. Mitch Daniels on Wednesday made his state the 23rd in the nation — and the only one in the Rust Belt — with a "right to work" law on its books. He also made Indiana the latest state in which Republicans have successfully pushed legislation that has angered unions and their traditional allies in the Democratic Party. Daniels signed the bill hours after the GOP-controlled state Senate passed it in a 28-22 vote; the new law allows workers to avoid paying dues even if the workplace has a union contract.
NEWS
July 1, 1988
Convicted sex offenders in Georgia and Washington will be required to submit to AIDS tests under laws effective today, while Colorado apparently is the first state to require such a test for those charged but not yet convicted of sex offenses. Colorado's law would make test results available "to any victim of the sexual offense who requests such disclosure," but those victims would face fines or jail terms if they disclosed the information to unauthorized people.
NATIONAL
March 20, 2004 | Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writer
Pharmacist Matt Hartwig got a call recently from a drugstore he owns in rural Missouri. A woman had come in with a prescription for the "morning-after" pill, which can prevent most pregnancies if taken within three days of unprotected sex. The pharmacist on duty had refused to sell it to her. Although the federal government classifies the pill as an emergency contraceptive, the pharmacist said he considered it a form of abortion. He told the woman he was morally opposed to providing it.
NEWS
January 31, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
State lawmakers handed a victory to anti-abortion interests Tuesday by deciding not to vote on repealing unenforceable criminal penalties for doctors who perform abortions. Abortion rights advocates had sought to wipe out the penalties, which were rendered unenforceable in 1973 by the Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade decision, in case the court later reversed itself.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|