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Legislation Iraq

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NEWS
April 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraq's parliament recommended that April 28, President Saddam Hussein's birthday, be made an annual national holiday, the Iraqi News Agency INA said. According to INA, lawmakers made the recommendation to show "appreciation of the president's role in leading the Iraqi people in the most difficult time that is confronting aggressors and their [conspiratorial] plots against Iraq and its people."
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WORLD
March 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
House Democratic leaders have coalesced around legislation that would require troops to come home from Iraq within six months if that country's leaders failed to meet promises to help reduce violence there, party officials said Thursday. The plan would retain a Democratic proposal prohibiting the deployment to Iraq of troops with insufficient rest or training or who already have served there for more than a year.
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WORLD
March 2, 2007 | From the Associated Press
House Democratic leaders have coalesced around legislation that would require troops to come home from Iraq within six months if that country's leaders failed to meet promises to help reduce violence there, party officials said Thursday. The plan would retain a Democratic proposal prohibiting the deployment to Iraq of troops with insufficient rest or training or who already have served there for more than a year.
NEWS
April 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Iraq's parliament recommended that April 28, President Saddam Hussein's birthday, be made an annual national holiday, the Iraqi News Agency INA said. According to INA, lawmakers made the recommendation to show "appreciation of the president's role in leading the Iraqi people in the most difficult time that is confronting aggressors and their [conspiratorial] plots against Iraq and its people."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 1990 | MEL LEVINE, Rep. Mel Levine (D-Santa Monica) serves on the House subcommittee on Europe and the Middle East.
The Bush Administration's policy toward Iraq caught up with reality the day Iraq invaded Kuwait. While President Bush has done a solid and effective job of leading the international community and marshaling American military might to demonstrate to Saddam Hussein that his aggression will fail, it is ironic that the Administration was sending Hussein business-as-usual signals as recently as the day before the invasion.
WORLD
February 10, 2003 | John Daniszewski, Times Staff Writer
The top two U.N. weapons inspectors came to this capital over the weekend wanting something spectacular from Iraqi authorities to prevent a war. After two days of intense and arduous meetings, they announced Sunday night that what they got was not bad. The Iraqis served up reams of documents purporting to answer outstanding questions about their nuclear activities and to support their contention that they unilaterally destroyed and buried VX nerve agents, anthrax and other banned substances.
WORLD
July 4, 2007 | Tina Susman and Saif Hameed, Times Staff Writers
Legislation to manage Iraq's oil industry won Cabinet approval Tuesday and could go before the parliament for ratification within days, but political wrangling raised the possibility of delays in passing the long-stalled measure. The legislation is the less controversial of two measures covering Iraq's oil wealth. The second measure would set up the mechanism for ensuring that oil profits are distributed properly.
NATIONAL
March 28, 2007 | Noam N. Levey, Times Staff Writer
Setting the stage for a confrontation with President Bush over the war in Iraq, the Senate on Tuesday for the first time backed a timeline for withdrawing U.S. troops. The 50-48 vote turned aside a Republican bid to strip timelines from a $122-billion emergency spending bill being sought by the White House to pay for the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.
WORLD
April 8, 2009 | Ned Parker and Christi Parsons
President Obama made a surprise visit to Baghdad on Tuesday, declaring it time for U.S. troops to start leaving and Iraqis to take complete charge of their country. Events illustrated just how difficult that may yet prove to be. The number of violent incidents in Baghdad has been increasing: Six car bombs exploded in the capital the day before Obama's visit, killing 36 people. Another detonated Tuesday before he arrived, killing nine more.
NEWS
February 7, 1991 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III said Wednesday that the United States and its allies might help rebuild postwar Iraq, but when pressed by members of Congress, he said reparations might be exacted if Iraq fights to the finish in a bloody ground war. "The time of reconstruction and recovery should not be the occasion for vengeful actions against a nation forced to war by a dictator's ambition," Baker told the House Foreign Affairs Committee.
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