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NEWS
June 9, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa's campaign for the legal authority to send noncombat Japanese troops overseas on a regular basis passed its biggest hurdle today. After five consecutive early-morning sessions marked by obstructionist tactics by Socialists and Communists, the upper house of Parliament approved legislation that would let Japan send up to 2,000 troops overseas to take part in U.N.-sponsored peacekeeping operations.
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NEWS
January 29, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimiko tells her story with calm detachment. How her husband beat her dozens of times during their 32 years together, raining blows down on her face, thighs and stomach, pounding her back with wooden boards, kicking her hard enough to break a rib. When he wasn't abusing her body, he tortured her spirit, making her feel ugly, awkward and worthless and forcing her to attend to his every whim.
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BUSINESS
January 24, 1994 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pessimism sparked by the defeat late last week of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's anti-corruption political reform package prompted a sharp plunge in Tokyo stocks early today. Hosokawa's setback in Parliament clouds prospects for quick passage of an economic stimulus program, which investors have counted on to jump-start Japan's stagnant economy. Political disarray in Tokyo also poses new difficulties for the resolution of U.S.-Japan trade disputes.
NEWS
July 23, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's lower house of parliament voted overwhelmingly Thursday to grant legal status to the nation's flag and imperial anthem, despite polls showing that more than one in three citizens object to official recognition for what they see as symbols of Japanese militarism.
NEWS
February 4, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Japanese Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa today abruptly backed down from a tax package proposed just one day earlier to jump-start the flagging economy, a stunning turnabout meant to quell a political backlash that had threatened to destroy his ruling coalition. Hosokawa's reversal on plans to enact a $49-billion tax cut, and a new welfare tax to finance it, came after hours of fruitless negotiations with the Socialists, who had threatened to quit the coalition.
NEWS
February 5, 1994 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's new landmark political reform package will bring on many changes--but not the purported one of ferreting out entrenched corruption among politicians, bureaucrats and industry. Instead, the most likely effect of changes to the election system and political donation rules will be a further concentration of power in the hands of party bosses.
NEWS
January 23, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japanese leaders on both sides of the political fence moved Saturday to help Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa stay in office, even if he fails in an eleventh-hour bid to salvage his political reforms. "Full efforts must be devoted to carrying out measures to spur the economy," said Michio Watanabe, former foreign minister and a major faction leader of the opposition Liberal Democratic Party.
BUSINESS
September 1, 1992 | From Times Wire Services
The timing of the next session of Japan's Parliament and a wrangle with opposition parties threaten to hold up passage of a huge government fiscal package until late this year, delaying its impact on the economy, analysts said. The $85-billion package announced last week includes new public works spending, increased lending by government financial institutions and other measures to revive Japan's sluggish economy and check a steep drop in stock prices.
BUSINESS
September 30, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Securities Bill Passes Key Test: The lower house of Japan's Diet, or Parliament, approved the government's bill to revise securities laws to ban the payment of compensation for losses in the securities markets. The bill now moves to the upper house, where a special committee looking into financial scandals will debate it. Passage of the law seems assured because the powerful lower house can overrule the upper house on matters that are not budgets or treaties.
NEWS
December 4, 1991 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move ending Japan's postwar policy of non-involvement in overseas military affairs, the lower house of Parliament passed a bill Tuesday permitting the Cabinet to dispatch Japanese troops abroad for emergency relief missions and noncombat U.N. peacekeeping operations. Support from the Buddhist-backed Komei (Clean Government) Party was expected to ensure the measure's passage in the upper house, where the ruling Liberal Democrats lack a majority.
NEWS
June 3, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan decided Wednesday that it will legalize the birth control pill, 34 years after the contraceptive was first submitted for approval and less than five months after Viagra gained rapid permission for sale here. But more than three decades of propaganda about the dangers of the pill may discourage many Japanese women from using it when marketing begins in the autumn, family planning experts said. In a newspaper poll last year, only 7.
NEWS
April 27, 1999 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Japan's lower house of parliament approved long-awaited legislation today that spells out how this nation will assist U.S military forces in case conflict breaks out in its neighborhood. The guidelines for U.S.-Japan defense cooperation do not require Japan to change its "no war" constitution or to fight unless directly attacked.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | ELIZABETH LAZAROWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that has sparked hope for people awaiting organ transplants, Japan's parliament Tuesday passed a bill authorizing transplants from patients whose brains have stopped functioning. Japan has been one of the world's few industrialized nations to prohibit most transplants, and doctors say thousands of people have died as a result. "Without a law, transplants essentially couldn't take place in Japan . . .
NEWS
May 2, 1997 | ELIZABETH LAZAROWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because Japan's first and only heart transplant operation almost 30 years ago prompted criminal investigations, the debate over when death legally occurs has raged on here since, making human organ transplants nearly impossible.
NEWS
November 14, 1995 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Overriding strong resistance from its main political opposition, Japan's ruling coalition rammed a controversial bill tightening supervision of religious organizations through the lower house of Parliament on Monday. The bill was initiated in response to a terror attack on the Tokyo subway system last spring, allegedly by the Aum Supreme Truth religious cult. It must still get through the legislature's upper house.
BUSINESS
April 14, 1995 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese government today approved an economic stimulus package, while the Bank of Japan lowered its official discount rate by 0.75 percentage point to a record low of 1%. Both the stimulus package and the interest rate cut were coordinated and are aimed at coping with the yen's sharp appreciation against the dollar and a resulting threat to Japan's fledgling economic recovery. The yen has appreciated about 17% since Jan. 1.
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | SAM JAMESON and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a silent prayer for the 5,391 dead and its speediest legislation in 44 years, Japan on Friday marked the end of the first month of suffering for victims of Kobe's killer earthquake and the beginning of budget measures to promote rehabilitation. Twice during the day--at 5:46 a.m., the moment at which the 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck on Jan. 17, and again at noon--Toshitami Kaihara, governor of Hyogo prefecture, or state, led a one-minute silent prayer.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japanese Tax Cuts Approved: Matching the thrust of American demands, Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama's coalition Cabinet approved another two years of income-tax cuts without increasing other taxes in a move designed to stimulate Japan's economy. The reform package, to be submitted to Parliament for approval, expected this fall, guarantees that Japanese citizens will pocket at least $104 billion in tax savings in the next two years.
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | SAM JAMESON and TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With a silent prayer for the 5,391 dead and its speediest legislation in 44 years, Japan on Friday marked the end of the first month of suffering for victims of Kobe's killer earthquake and the beginning of budget measures to promote rehabilitation. Twice during the day--at 5:46 a.m., the moment at which the 6.8-magnitude earthquake struck on Jan. 17, and again at noon--Toshitami Kaihara, governor of Hyogo prefecture, or state, led a one-minute silent prayer.
NEWS
December 26, 1994 | Associated Press
Japan's Cabinet, struggling with a 3-year-old recession, approved a 1995 budget Sunday that would reduce spending for the first time in 40 years while expanding public works and foreign aid. The budget, which needs Parliament's approval, totals $710 billion for the fiscal year starting April 1, down almost 3% from the fiscal 1994 budget. It would be the first decline from year-earlier spending since a cut of 0.8% in 1955. Parliament is expected to convene in mid-January to consider the budget.
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