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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1995 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen and correspondents Maki Becker, James Benning, John Cox, Stephen Gregory, Tracy Johnson, Mary Moore, Susan Steinberg, Steve Ryfle, and Richard Winton
Restrictions on bullet sales were tightened in some cities but loosened in one in 1995. Some local lawmakers joined forces with school officials, approving laws that crack down on students who skip school. A sampling of laws enacted in 1995: Los Angeles Alarms--Hoping to reduce the number of false alarms that police must answer, an $80 fine will be levied against owners of security alarm systems that generate more than four false alarms in a 12-month period.
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NEWS
September 2, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to end one of Los Angeles County's longest-running political feuds, state legislators early Friday agreed to help build a new public hospital in the San Gabriel Valley, allowing the county to downsize County-USC Medical Center. Under the deal, the historic County-USC facility in Boyle Heights will be rebuilt with the 600-bed capacity the county wanted, rather than the 750 beds Eastside lawmakers desired.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing ahead with its own brand of pork-barrel legislation, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday requested the drafting of a law to make it legal to own pigs in unincorporated residential neighborhoods. Not just any hogs--only domesticated Vietnamese potbellied pigs, which have gained a reputation among their owners as being clean, well mannered and intelligent. The County Code currently outlaws the keeping of "any live pig or hog of any age . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two top police officials in Los Angeles County announced their support Monday for banning gun shows on county property. Sheriff Lee Baca and Los Angeles Police Department Chief Bernard C. Parks joined a majority of the Board of Supervisors at a packed news conference to praise the proposed ordinance, designed to end what is billed as the world's largest gun show, held four times each year at the county fairgrounds in Pomona. "L.A. County is not a frontier county anymore," Baca said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1998
Billboard bans were a common subject for legislation in Los Angeles County during 1998. Most of the prohibitions applied to the billboard advertising of tobacco and alcoholic products. Other measures ranged from yard sale regulations to curbs on gun sales; still others covered beasts and bees and even the thong bathing suit. A sampling: Los Angeles County Subways--One of the most significant measures countywide was approved not by the Board of Supervisors but by voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From where Steve Lorens sat, a needle etching the image of a Rottweiler into his upper back, the idea of Los Angeles County government regulating the tattoo business areas sounded absurd. "Are they going to walk around and give each tattoo an A, B, C or D?" Lorens asked as he sat in a Covina tattoo parlor, referring to the county's rating system for restaurants. "They call this America. You should be able to do what you want."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two top police officials in Los Angeles County announced their support Monday for banning gun shows on county property. Sheriff Lee Baca and Los Angeles Police Department Chief Bernard C. Parks joined a majority of the Board of Supervisors at a packed news conference to praise the proposed ordinance, designed to end what is billed as the world's largest gun show, held four times each year at the county fairgrounds in Pomona. "L.A. County is not a frontier county anymore," Baca said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
The two top police officials in Los Angeles County announced their support Monday for banning gun shows on county property. Sheriff Lee Baca and Los Angeles Police Department Chief Bernard C. Parks joined a majority of the Board of Supervisors at a packed news conference to praise the proposed ordinance, designed to end what is billed as the world's largest gun show, held four times each year at the county fairgrounds in Pomona. "L.A. County is not a frontier county anymore," Baca said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999
Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Hernandez on Wednesday postponed for 10 days a vote on his controversial proposal to block funding for the Los Angeles to Pasadena rail line. A state law stripped the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of its responsibility for the construction of that light-rail line, instead creating a special five-member panel to oversee it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | MAX VANZI and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With time running out for the Legislature to act, Los Angeles-area lawmakers pledged Wednesday to make a final push to prevent the collapse of the county's public health system--despite encountering resistance from the county they are trying to help. At a meeting this week with Los Angeles County officials, legislators laid out a financial rescue plan that would inject $123 million into the county treasury this year and $75 million annually for the next four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 24, 1999 | From a Times Staff Writer
The two top police officials in Los Angeles County announced their support Monday for banning gun shows on county property. Sheriff Lee Baca and Los Angeles Police Department Chief Bernard C. Parks joined a majority of the Board of Supervisors at a packed news conference to praise the proposed ordinance, designed to end what is billed as the world's largest gun show, held four times each year at the county fairgrounds in Pomona. "L.A. County is not a frontier county anymore," Baca said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
From where Steve Lorens sat, a needle etching the image of a Rottweiler into his upper back, the idea of Los Angeles County government regulating the tattoo business areas sounded absurd. "Are they going to walk around and give each tattoo an A, B, C or D?" Lorens asked as he sat in a Covina tattoo parlor, referring to the county's rating system for restaurants. "They call this America. You should be able to do what you want."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 4, 1999
Los Angeles City Councilman Mike Hernandez on Wednesday postponed for 10 days a vote on his controversial proposal to block funding for the Los Angeles to Pasadena rail line. A state law stripped the Metropolitan Transportation Authority of its responsibility for the construction of that light-rail line, instead creating a special five-member panel to oversee it.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1998
Billboard bans were a common subject for legislation in Los Angeles County during 1998. Most of the prohibitions applied to the billboard advertising of tobacco and alcoholic products. Other measures ranged from yard sale regulations to curbs on gun sales; still others covered beasts and bees and even the thong bathing suit. A sampling: Los Angeles County Subways--One of the most significant measures countywide was approved not by the Board of Supervisors but by voters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 29, 1995 | Times researcher Cecilia Rasmussen and correspondents Maki Becker, James Benning, John Cox, Stephen Gregory, Tracy Johnson, Mary Moore, Susan Steinberg, Steve Ryfle, and Richard Winton
Restrictions on bullet sales were tightened in some cities but loosened in one in 1995. Some local lawmakers joined forces with school officials, approving laws that crack down on students who skip school. A sampling of laws enacted in 1995: Los Angeles Alarms--Hoping to reduce the number of false alarms that police must answer, an $80 fine will be levied against owners of security alarm systems that generate more than four false alarms in a 12-month period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1995 | MAX VANZI and JEFFREY L. RABIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
With time running out for the Legislature to act, Los Angeles-area lawmakers pledged Wednesday to make a final push to prevent the collapse of the county's public health system--despite encountering resistance from the county they are trying to help. At a meeting this week with Los Angeles County officials, legislators laid out a financial rescue plan that would inject $123 million into the county treasury this year and $75 million annually for the next four years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 1991
A former Lancaster city official who claimed that the City Council violated the state's open-meetings law in voting to oppose two gay rights bills said Monday that he will not file a lawsuit against the city to challenge the decision. Former Deputy City Clerk Alan Robertson, who is gay and resigned in protest over the council's May 6 vote, said he was concerned that he and the gay-oriented church group that he heads might have had to pay the city's legal expenses if the city had won in court.
NEWS
September 2, 2000 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to end one of Los Angeles County's longest-running political feuds, state legislators early Friday agreed to help build a new public hospital in the San Gabriel Valley, allowing the county to downsize County-USC Medical Center. Under the deal, the historic County-USC facility in Boyle Heights will be rebuilt with the 600-bed capacity the county wanted, rather than the 750 beds Eastside lawmakers desired.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1993 | JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The fur was flying as the Lancaster City Council voted 3 to 2 to reject a county proposal to begin mandatory cat licensing in the city and to add a $2 surcharge to dog licenses. The council majority decided Monday night that the finicky felines and their freewheeling lifestyle ought not be fettered by licenses. The council minority sided with county animal control officials, who argued that licensing would reduce the growing number of unidentified, impounded cats who must be killed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1991 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pushing ahead with its own brand of pork-barrel legislation, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday requested the drafting of a law to make it legal to own pigs in unincorporated residential neighborhoods. Not just any hogs--only domesticated Vietnamese potbellied pigs, which have gained a reputation among their owners as being clean, well mannered and intelligent. The County Code currently outlaws the keeping of "any live pig or hog of any age . . .
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