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NEWS
February 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
A sweeping welfare bill described as the nation's toughest easily passed the Massachusetts Legislature on Thursday, as lawmakers voted to force thousands of poor people to go to work and to cut welfare checks for others. The bill was approved by the House, 133 to 21, and the Senate, 31 to 3. Gov. William F. Weld, who has been fighting for more than a year to require welfare recipients to get jobs, indicated that he will sign it today.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The United Church of Christ is urging its ministers to support a bill that would require clergy to report suspected sexual abuse. A denomination teacher recently said his confession of abuse to church leaders was a spiritual act and should be kept secret. Susan Dickerman, associate minister of the United Church of Christ, has e-mailed every Congregationalist minister in Massachusetts, asking them to work for a change in the law.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 15, 2001 | From Times Wire Services
The United Church of Christ is urging its ministers to support a bill that would require clergy to report suspected sexual abuse. A denomination teacher recently said his confession of abuse to church leaders was a spiritual act and should be kept secret. Susan Dickerman, associate minister of the United Church of Christ, has e-mailed every Congregationalist minister in Massachusetts, asking them to work for a change in the law.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city there is church and state. Somewhere above both is baseball. With a hometown team that last won the World Series in 1918, baseball in Boston is tragedy. Baseball is hope: "Maybe next year" is the cry of newborns and nonagenarians alike. Baseball is faith: With a bunch of bums like these, you just got to believe.
NEWS
June 14, 1989
An unprecedented plan by Boston University to take over the Chelsea public schools became law as Gov. Michael S. Dukakis signed a bill that offered new hope to the troubled district, but raised union opposition. Chelsea, a city just northeast of Boston with one of the most troubled school systems in Massachusetts, will receive new school buildings, an infusion of money and the academic clout of Boston University. In exchange, the school committee will turn over control of the schools to the university for a decade.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Declaring that "assault rifles are built for one purpose--to kill people," Gov. Michael S. Dukakis signed legislation barring their sale or possession in Boston and called for a statewide and national ban. "They belong on battlefields, not in our schools or on the streets of our cities," Dukakis said during a ceremony at a Boston police station that has been in the heart of the city's battle against drugs and gang violence.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | Reuters
Gov. William F. Weld on Tuesday called for reinstatement of the death penalty after two police officers in the state were shot and killed within a week. Weld refiled a broad package of anti-crime legislation, first proposed in 1991, calling for restoration of the death sentence and mandatory life sentences for repeat felons convicted of violent crimes.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | Reuters
Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld signed into law Friday a measure that abolishes Boston's elected School Committee and puts the nation's oldest school district under the control of the mayor. Weld's approval of the controversial bill makes Boston the third large U.S. city to put the governance of its schools in the hands of a panel selected by the mayor. New York and Baltimore also have non-elected school boards.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Massachusetts lawmakers have passed a landmark bill requiring tobacco companies to report, for the first time, the additives they use in each of their cigarette brands and smokeless tobacco products, disclosures they have successfully fought for nearly 20 years. Gov. William Weld has said he will sign the legislation, which also requires cigarette makers to annually report the nicotine yields of their products.
NEWS
February 10, 1995 | From Associated Press
A sweeping welfare bill described as the nation's toughest easily passed the Massachusetts Legislature on Thursday, as lawmakers voted to force thousands of poor people to go to work and to cut welfare checks for others. The bill was approved by the House, 133 to 21, and the Senate, 31 to 3. Gov. William F. Weld, who has been fighting for more than a year to require welfare recipients to get jobs, indicated that he will sign it today.
NEWS
February 9, 1994 | Reuters
Gov. William F. Weld on Tuesday called for reinstatement of the death penalty after two police officers in the state were shot and killed within a week. Weld refiled a broad package of anti-crime legislation, first proposed in 1991, calling for restoration of the death sentence and mandatory life sentences for repeat felons convicted of violent crimes.
NEWS
July 6, 1991 | Reuters
Massachusetts Gov. William F. Weld signed into law Friday a measure that abolishes Boston's elected School Committee and puts the nation's oldest school district under the control of the mayor. Weld's approval of the controversial bill makes Boston the third large U.S. city to put the governance of its schools in the hands of a panel selected by the mayor. New York and Baltimore also have non-elected school boards.
BUSINESS
July 26, 1996 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Massachusetts lawmakers have passed a landmark bill requiring tobacco companies to report, for the first time, the additives they use in each of their cigarette brands and smokeless tobacco products, disclosures they have successfully fought for nearly 20 years. Gov. William Weld has said he will sign the legislation, which also requires cigarette makers to annually report the nicotine yields of their products.
NEWS
July 27, 2000 | ELIZABETH MEHREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In this city there is church and state. Somewhere above both is baseball. With a hometown team that last won the World Series in 1918, baseball in Boston is tragedy. Baseball is hope: "Maybe next year" is the cry of newborns and nonagenarians alike. Baseball is faith: With a bunch of bums like these, you just got to believe.
NEWS
December 10, 1989 | From Times staff and wire reports
Declaring that "assault rifles are built for one purpose--to kill people," Gov. Michael S. Dukakis signed legislation barring their sale or possession in Boston and called for a statewide and national ban. "They belong on battlefields, not in our schools or on the streets of our cities," Dukakis said during a ceremony at a Boston police station that has been in the heart of the city's battle against drugs and gang violence.
NEWS
November 7, 1989 | From Times staff and wire service reports
The Legislature passed a sweeping civil rights bill for homosexuals that will be the second such state law in the nation. The ban on discrimination against gay men and women in housing, employment, credit, insurance and public accommodations cleared the state Senate, 21 to 9, and Gov. Michael S. Dukakis has said he will sign it. Conservative senators who opposed the bill promised to put the issue to voters in a repeal referendum. The two acknowledged homosexuals in Congress, Reps. Gerry E.
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