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NEWS
March 22, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the battle for electoral democracy largely won, a new Mexican revolution is brewing--over access to information. That struggle could prove as tough as the fight for a fair ballot. In a society where information has always been jealously concentrated at the top of the power pyramid, a movement is emerging to democratize information. Editors, academics and civic action groups are joining together to demand a U.S.-style freedom of information act.
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NEWS
April 29, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican Congress on Saturday overwhelmingly approved broad constitutional reforms granting autonomy and other rights to millions of indigenous people, although last-minute changes to the measure raised doubts that it will satisfy Indian rebels in Chiapas state. The lower Chamber of Deputies voted 386 to 60 in favor of the reform package three days after the Senate unanimously approved the bill.
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NEWS
December 31, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bitterly divided Mexican legislators struck an eleventh-hour deal Wednesday to approve the 1999 federal budget, averting a potential constitutional crisis and teaching the ruling party a lesson in political compromise. The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, caved in to a demand from the right-of-center National Action Party, or PAN, to ditch a controversial 15% surcharge on all phone bills in return for the PAN's support on the budget vote.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican government Friday stepped up its lobbying for a radical tax reform program, certainly one of President Vicente Fox's toughest political battles and critical to his prospects for transforming the Mexican economy. Finance Minister Francisco Gil Diaz addressed just one topic in his address to the annual Mexican bankers' convention: tax reform.
BUSINESS
March 21, 1996
Mexico Takes Step to Set Up Pension Funds: President Ernesto Zedillo sent a bill to Congress to establish the country's first privately run pension funds. Officials said subsidiaries of foreign banks would be able to manage them. In a move Zedillo hopes will pump up the pitifully low savings rate in Mexico and make available funds for long-term investment, the bill would for the first time give Mexicans control over the way their retirement savings are invested.
NEWS
December 3, 1997 | Associated Press
Mexico's Senate unanimously approved legislation Tuesday granting millions of Mexicans living abroad a wide range of benefits, including the right to vote and hold dual citizenship. Among those directly affected by the legislation, which implements constitutional reforms ratified last year, are an estimated 4 million native-born Mexicans living legally in the United States.
BUSINESS
July 4, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
PEMEX Restructuring Plan Sent to Mexican Congress: President Carlos Salinas de Gortari has sent his country's lawmakers a bill to restructure the state oil monopoly, Petroleos Mexicanos, as a consortium of semiautonomous enterprises. The legislation was presented to the House of Deputies. The plan calls for dividing PEMEX into four companies that would handle exploration, refining, production and marketing.
BUSINESS
June 29, 1990 | JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, in a move aimed at returning Mexico's banks to private hands and internationalizing the country's financial services, proposed legislation Thursday that, among other things, would permit foreign investment in banks and stock brokerages. The principal bill--a broad measure that would reverse the 1982 nationalization of banks--would allow up to 30% foreign ownership of any of the institutions.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | From Reuters
The Mexican Senate has rejected a key provision of a proposed film law that had sought to force theaters to reserve 10% of screen time for Mexican movies, it was reported Wednesday. Backers had hailed the law as a way of reviving Mexico's film industry by helping it compete against Hollywood. The law will probably have to wait until the new legislative session next year, as legislators are currently debating the 1999 budget, the newspaper Reforma said.
NEWS
March 29, 2001 | CHRIS KRAUL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Masked Zapatista rebels took the floor of Mexico's Congress on Wednesday to argue for an Indian rights bill, a historic appearance that raised hopes for an end to their seven-year conflict with the government. Two dozen Zapatistas, unarmed and wearing their trademark ski masks, filed past congressional deputies and took seats in two rows directly in front of the speaker's lectern.
NEWS
March 22, 2001 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the battle for electoral democracy largely won, a new Mexican revolution is brewing--over access to information. That struggle could prove as tough as the fight for a fair ballot. In a society where information has always been jealously concentrated at the top of the power pyramid, a movement is emerging to democratize information. Editors, academics and civic action groups are joining together to demand a U.S.-style freedom of information act.
NEWS
December 6, 2000 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Vicente Fox on Tuesday submitted a bill that would dramatically expand the rights of Mexico's indigenous people, addressing a key demand of the Zapatista rebels in Chiapas state. Adoption of the bill, Fox's first legislative initiative, would pave the way for resumption of peace talks to end the nearly 7-year-old conflict between the government and Maya Indians in Mexico's southernmost and poorest state.
NEWS
November 25, 2000 | From Associated Press
Owners of used cars smuggled into Mexico from the United States may soon be able to legally register their vehicles under a bill passed by the Mexican Senate this week. The bill would allow legal registration of foreign cars manufactured from 1970 through 1993 that were brought into the country before Oct. 31. The bill, approved Thursday, now moves to the lower house, where quick approval is expected, and it would then become law.
NEWS
July 2, 1999 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Mexican Senate on Thursday quietly let die a proposal to allow millions of Mexicans living abroad to vote by absentee ballot, denying the franchise to a potentially large bloc of voters in next year's presidential election. Mexican activists in the United States who had lobbied for the absentee vote were furious at being excluded from the 2000 ballot. Many blamed the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, which has ruled for 70 years.
NEWS
January 1, 1999 | From Associated Press
President Ernesto Zedillo praised lawmakers for approving a 1999 budget that adheres to his goal of limiting the fiscal deficit to 1.25% of gross domestic product, a spokesman said Thursday. The lower house of Congress approved the budget without a 15% tax on phone service that the Zedillo administration initially sought. To make up for lost revenue, lawmakers adopted additional spending cuts and several revenue-raising measures, including a 5% increase in diesel fuel prices.
NEWS
March 16, 1998 | MARY BETH SHERIDAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an effort to break a yearlong impasse with the Zapatista rebels, the Mexican government sent legislation to Congress on Sunday that would provide greater rights for Indians in the troubled southern state of Chiapas. But it was unclear whether the move would propel Chiapas toward peace or war. The legislation was based on a celebrated accord between the government and rebels reached two years ago.
NEWS
October 30, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Ernesto Zedillo is expected to sign into law this week a controversial organized-crime bill that gives law-enforcement agencies here sweeping powers to attack Mexico's sophisticated narcotics cartels and other criminal gangs. The bill, approved late Monday night by the Chamber of Deputies, legalizes government wiretaps and witness secrecy for the first time.
NEWS
December 31, 1998 | JAMES F. SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bitterly divided Mexican legislators struck an eleventh-hour deal Wednesday to approve the 1999 federal budget, averting a potential constitutional crisis and teaching the ruling party a lesson in political compromise. The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, known as the PRI, caved in to a demand from the right-of-center National Action Party, or PAN, to ditch a controversial 15% surcharge on all phone bills in return for the PAN's support on the budget vote.
NEWS
December 17, 1998 | From Reuters
The Mexican Senate has rejected a key provision of a proposed film law that had sought to force theaters to reserve 10% of screen time for Mexican movies, it was reported Wednesday. Backers had hailed the law as a way of reviving Mexico's film industry by helping it compete against Hollywood. The law will probably have to wait until the new legislative session next year, as legislators are currently debating the 1999 budget, the newspaper Reforma said.
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