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NEWS
August 13, 1991 | PETER CARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since her daughter was shot to death, Danna Schaeffer hasn't thought twice about jumping into the line of fire. Last spring, the petite woman with short red hair bounced to her feet in a suburban Oregon church auditorium filled with angry gun-control opponents. Without blinking, Schaeffer faced the crowd and said exactly what they didn't want to hear. Earlier, the rage in the town meeting had been aimed at Rep. Les AuCoin (D-Ore.
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NEWS
September 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Barbara Roberts signed into law a bill that launches Oregon's health care plan by extending Medicaid coverage to thousands of uninsured people. The expansion of Medicaid to 120,000 poverty-level Oregonians, beginning in February, will be financed by a 10-cent-a-pack increase in the state's cigarette tax. Oregon received Clinton Administration approval to extend Medicaid coverage to more poor people by limiting the services the state will pay for.
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NEWS
August 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
About 120,000 poor people in Oregon will get their medical bills paid with money gleaned from cigarette smokers, while businesses have until 1997 to provide health care for uninsured workers. The Legislature this week approved a 10-cents-a-pack cigarette tax to pay for Medicaid coverage for 120,000 people. It also gave businesses until 1997 to begin providing health coverage for 280,000 uninsured workers. The measures are supported by Gov. Barbara Roberts.
NEWS
August 7, 1993 | From Associated Press
About 120,000 poor people in Oregon will get their medical bills paid with money gleaned from cigarette smokers, while businesses have until 1997 to provide health care for uninsured workers. The Legislature this week approved a 10-cents-a-pack cigarette tax to pay for Medicaid coverage for 120,000 people. It also gave businesses until 1997 to begin providing health coverage for 280,000 uninsured workers. The measures are supported by Gov. Barbara Roberts.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Oregon Gov. Barbara Roberts signed a bill that will restructure the state's high schools, separating college-bound students from those in vocational training. Roberts said in Salem that the measure represents "another major Oregon first" that will be copied by other states. It will revamp high school so students get a "certificate of mastery" in the 10th grade. Students then will be steered toward college preparatory courses or a program combining academic work and vocational training.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1989
An Oregon legislative subcommittee has agreed to appropriate $500,000 to pay the state's cost of caring for the 53 children removed from the Watts-based Ecclesia Athletic Assn. camp in October. The subcommittee of the Legislative Emergency Board made the recommendation after being told by the state Department of Justice that there was little chance of getting the money from the children's families. The 53 children have been in state custody since Oct.
NEWS
September 15, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Gov. Barbara Roberts signed into law a bill that launches Oregon's health care plan by extending Medicaid coverage to thousands of uninsured people. The expansion of Medicaid to 120,000 poverty-level Oregonians, beginning in February, will be financed by a 10-cent-a-pack increase in the state's cigarette tax. Oregon received Clinton Administration approval to extend Medicaid coverage to more poor people by limiting the services the state will pay for.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
With a Friday deadline looming, Gov. Barbara Roberts and other backers of Oregon's health rationing plan say all signs are pointing to a favorable ruling by the Clinton Administration. "Oregon is on the brink of being able to offer health care services to thousands of uninsured," Roberts spokeswoman Gwenn Baldwin said Wednesday. The New York Times reported in its editions today that the Clinton Administration is expected to approve Oregon's plan to ration health care to poor people in the state.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whose pain to ease? What sickness to treat? At how high a cost? For how long? And, yes: Whose sickness not to treat? What pain must be endured? In annual budget debates over dollars and cents, God-like health care questions like these seldom are raised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 1996
The July 1 article on train horn blowing was again a rehash of the same cliched rhetoric on the part of railroad governing officialdom. "You can't mess around with safety," says chairwoman Sarah L. Catz of the MetroLink board of directors. Railroad tracks have been there for over 100 years--far longer than the homes, say railroad officials. These types of emotional or juvenile responses are typical of the deflective language by railroad officialdom as they attempt to direct attention from their primary concern: Accidents disrupt train schedules, causing major inconvenience and time loss until the collision investigation is completed and the damage and possible carnage is removed from the track right of way. Unlike air traffic patterns and auto traffic, which can be routed around an accident, trains are limited to traveling on a set of rails.
NEWS
March 18, 1993 | From Associated Press
With a Friday deadline looming, Gov. Barbara Roberts and other backers of Oregon's health rationing plan say all signs are pointing to a favorable ruling by the Clinton Administration. "Oregon is on the brink of being able to offer health care services to thousands of uninsured," Roberts spokeswoman Gwenn Baldwin said Wednesday. The New York Times reported in its editions today that the Clinton Administration is expected to approve Oregon's plan to ration health care to poor people in the state.
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | PETER CARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since her daughter was shot to death, Danna Schaeffer hasn't thought twice about jumping into the line of fire. Last spring, the petite woman with short red hair bounced to her feet in a suburban Oregon church auditorium filled with angry gun-control opponents. Without blinking, Schaeffer faced the crowd and said exactly what they didn't want to hear. Earlier, the rage in the town meeting had been aimed at Rep. Les AuCoin (D-Ore.
NEWS
August 1, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Oregon Gov. Barbara Roberts signed a bill that will restructure the state's high schools, separating college-bound students from those in vocational training. Roberts said in Salem that the measure represents "another major Oregon first" that will be copied by other states. It will revamp high school so students get a "certificate of mastery" in the 10th grade. Students then will be steered toward college preparatory courses or a program combining academic work and vocational training.
NEWS
July 1, 1991 | JOHN BALZAR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Whose pain to ease? What sickness to treat? At how high a cost? For how long? And, yes: Whose sickness not to treat? What pain must be endured? In annual budget debates over dollars and cents, God-like health care questions like these seldom are raised.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1989
An Oregon legislative subcommittee has agreed to appropriate $500,000 to pay the state's cost of caring for the 53 children removed from the Watts-based Ecclesia Athletic Assn. camp in October. The subcommittee of the Legislative Emergency Board made the recommendation after being told by the state Department of Justice that there was little chance of getting the money from the children's families. The 53 children have been in state custody since Oct.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 28, 1994 | MARY ALICE ALTORFER, Mary Alice Altorfer is a mother of five and a college student in Santa Maria.
I was told that her name was Mary; our only common thread. Other than casting quick glances toward her room, this Mary avoided that Mary. I convinced myself that I had come only to visit my great aunt who, at the time, was living in a nursing home. But as a regular visitor, I started taking interest in other patients, stopping often at different bedsides and wheelchairs to chat or share a pleasantry.
NEWS
November 21, 1995 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
As trends go, body piercing has hit it big. Nose and navel rings, tongue studs and ears laced with dangling wires no longer warrant a double take. What does deserve a second look, however, are the related health risks and possible complications. Serious side effects appear rare.
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