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September 5, 1994 | GEORGE SKELTON
This was the year voters got what they asked for from the Legislature. And it brings to mind the old adage about being careful what you ask for because you might get it. Californians likely will be paying the price well into the next century because in 1994 they tended to intimidate groveling politicians. This might seem ironical and incongruous, given the Capitol's pre-1993 history of gridlock and frequently ignoring voters. But these days officeholders are running scared.
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WORLD
March 11, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim, Mostaghim is a special correspondent.
Bad news hammered Iran's hard-line president Tuesday as a restless parliament rejected major elements of his proposed budget, an ally lost a bid for a key post held by a powerful cleric and a former prime minister announced that he was gunning for his job in upcoming elections.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach) will give a legislative update Friday morning at the Irvine Marriott hotel. The congressman will speak about the political climate in Washington and give an analysis of last week's California primary. Also on his agenda will be an overview of legislation recently passed by Congress, including a measure that aims to curtail illegal immigration, said a Cox spokesman. The forum is sponsored by the Irvine and Newport Beach chambers of commerce.
OPINION
June 7, 2008
To the surprise of no one, the Senate on Friday failed to pass a bill that would have taken the fight against global warming right to the streets and smokestacks of the United States. With a hostile administration in the White House and a group of entrenched Republican lawmakers who still haven't grasped the economic reality that failing to slow climate change will ultimately cost the country far more money than combating it, there was little chance of passage this year.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eni Faleomavaega, a Polynesian member of Congress just back from Mururoa atoll, predicted Wednesday that the resumption of French nuclear testing in the South Pacific will increase support for the independence movement in French Polynesia and lead to violence on the main island of Tahiti.
NEWS
October 23, 1986 | Associated Press
A state senator who has been voted one of the worst legislators in the state by his colleagues can't be accused of hiding the fact. He has emblazoned it on a campaign brochure being sent to 60,000 voters. Democratic state Sen. LeRoy Lemke's campaign organizers call the strategy a "preemptive strike." Republicans call it a gift. "I guess when you get a lemon you try to make lemonade," state Republican Chairman Don Adams said. "And he's got a big lemon."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 28, 1993 | MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Compton Mayor Walter R. Tucker III was elected to Congress last year, his colleagues on the City Council declined to put out the welcome mat for him, literally. Tucker sought to rent space for his congressional office in the city of Compton's new Martin Luther King Jr. Multipurpose Transit Center, but the council majority slammed the door in his face and hung up a "No Vacancy" sign.
OPINION
June 7, 2008
To the surprise of no one, the Senate on Friday failed to pass a bill that would have taken the fight against global warming right to the streets and smokestacks of the United States. With a hostile administration in the White House and a group of entrenched Republican lawmakers who still haven't grasped the economic reality that failing to slow climate change will ultimately cost the country far more money than combating it, there was little chance of passage this year.
WORLD
March 11, 2009 | Borzou Daragahi and Ramin Mostaghim, Mostaghim is a special correspondent.
Bad news hammered Iran's hard-line president Tuesday as a restless parliament rejected major elements of his proposed budget, an ally lost a bid for a key post held by a powerful cleric and a former prime minister announced that he was gunning for his job in upcoming elections.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 16, 1992 | STEVE PEACE, Assemblyman Steve Peace (D-Rancho San Diego) is chairman of the Assembly's Banking, Finance and Public Indebtedness Committee.
Throughout history, crisis has been the breeding ground for change. California's recent economic plunge and its offspring, the state budget crisis, presented just such an opportunity, one that could have fundamentally changed the manner in which governments at all levels in California operate. For a fleeting moment in the spring it looked as though California's leaders might seize the opportunity and run with it. What went wrong?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 6, 2001 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tiger Woods won the U.S. Open last June in a historic blowout, state Sen. Bruce McPherson was watching, thanks to Pacific Bell. When the Los Angeles Lakers mounted a magical fourth-quarter comeback against the Portland Trailblazers to reach the NBA Finals last year, Assemblyman Tom Calderon was in the stands with his son Cameron, courtesy of GTE.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling on his GOP rival George W. Bush and the Republican-led Congress to put aside partisanship and "stand up to Big Tobacco," Vice President Al Gore on Tuesday urged lawmakers to move quickly to regulate nicotine as an addictive drug now that the Supreme Court has ruled the Food and Drug Administration cannot legally take such action on its own.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could sink HMO reform in California this year or alter it dramatically, Assembly Democrats have decided on an all-or-nothing strategy to give patients the right to sue for a full range of civil damages. By next week, Democrats expect to have attached that provision to the major HMO reform bills in the Legislature, Assembly leaders said, including one written by an Orange County Republican.
NEWS
January 6, 1998 | MAX VANZI and CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The 1998 legislative session began Monday amid much resolve by Assembly and state Senate members to take on such major tasks as fixing schools and improving health care. Attention of Republicans and Democrats immediately focused on proposals, including one by Gov. Pete Wilson, to raise billions in bond funds to rebuild and expand dilapidated campuses.
NEWS
December 17, 1996 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the bars and restaurants around the Capitol, politicians and lobbyists have set out on a high-priced club crawl like no other. It may be the last under the current system of campaign fund-raising, one in which political giving is a constant, and no contribution is too big. The reason for the December money-raising rush is clear: At midnight Dec. 31, voter-approved Proposition 208 will ring in a new era, one with far stricter rules on political donations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 1996 | ENRIQUE LAVIN
Rep. Christopher Cox (R-Newport Beach) will give a legislative update Friday morning at the Irvine Marriott hotel. The congressman will speak about the political climate in Washington and give an analysis of last week's California primary. Also on his agenda will be an overview of legislation recently passed by Congress, including a measure that aims to curtail illegal immigration, said a Cox spokesman. The forum is sponsored by the Irvine and Newport Beach chambers of commerce.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1998 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a move that could sink HMO reform in California this year or alter it dramatically, Assembly Democrats have decided on an all-or-nothing strategy to give patients the right to sue for a full range of civil damages. By next week, Democrats expect to have attached that provision to the major HMO reform bills in the Legislature, Assembly leaders said, including one written by an Orange County Republican.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Calling on his GOP rival George W. Bush and the Republican-led Congress to put aside partisanship and "stand up to Big Tobacco," Vice President Al Gore on Tuesday urged lawmakers to move quickly to regulate nicotine as an addictive drug now that the Supreme Court has ruled the Food and Drug Administration cannot legally take such action on its own.
NEWS
September 7, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eni Faleomavaega, a Polynesian member of Congress just back from Mururoa atoll, predicted Wednesday that the resumption of French nuclear testing in the South Pacific will increase support for the independence movement in French Polynesia and lead to violence on the main island of Tahiti.
NEWS
September 5, 1994 | GEORGE SKELTON
This was the year voters got what they asked for from the Legislature. And it brings to mind the old adage about being careful what you ask for because you might get it. Californians likely will be paying the price well into the next century because in 1994 they tended to intimidate groveling politicians. This might seem ironical and incongruous, given the Capitol's pre-1993 history of gridlock and frequently ignoring voters. But these days officeholders are running scared.
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