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BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | BOB BAKER and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Superior Court judge on Thursday overturned San Francisco's landmark video display terminal safety ordinance, the only law in the United States that required private companies to protect workers from the muscle-straining dangers of VDT work by providing rest breaks and properly designed office furniture.
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NEWS
February 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
This city, which has hosted just one minor rodeo in the past five years, is close to a vote that could effectively ban them. The Board of Supervisors' small business subcommittee voted Thursday to ban calf roping and steer wrestling from any rodeo performance, calling them cruel. The subcommittee didn't ban bucking straps, which fasten tightly around an animal's hindquarters to make them buck. The full board will vote Feb. 14.
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NEWS
July 6, 1989
A landmark law that gives municipal sanction to unmarried but cohabitating couples, homosexual and heterosexual, has taken effect in San Francisco. The law permits unmarried couples to register their partnerships, similar to filing marriage licenses, to be declared "domestic partners." The legislation also grants hospital visitation rights and bereavement leave for city employees.
BUSINESS
February 14, 1992 | BOB BAKER and MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Superior Court judge on Thursday overturned San Francisco's landmark video display terminal safety ordinance, the only law in the United States that required private companies to protect workers from the muscle-straining dangers of VDT work by providing rest breaks and properly designed office furniture.
NEWS
February 5, 2000 | From Associated Press
This city, which has hosted just one minor rodeo in the past five years, is close to a vote that could effectively ban them. The Board of Supervisors' small business subcommittee voted Thursday to ban calf roping and steer wrestling from any rodeo performance, calling them cruel. The subcommittee didn't ban bucking straps, which fasten tightly around an animal's hindquarters to make them buck. The full board will vote Feb. 14.
BUSINESS
September 23, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
PG&E Corp., the owner of California's largest utility, is leaving the U.S. Chamber of Commerce because of the business group's opposition to federal climate change legislation. The San Francisco company won't renew its membership because of "fundamental differences" with the chamber's approach toward efforts to curb global warming, Peter Darbee, PG&E's chief executive, said in a letter to chamber President Tom Donohue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1996 | JEAN MERL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turning up the pressure on Mayor Richard Riordan to back off from Los Angeles International Airport revenues, an Arizona senator Friday introduced legislation aimed at making it much harder for Los Angeles and other cities to get their hands on money from their airports. In introducing his bill, Republican Sen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 9, 2001 | GEORGE SKELTON
Motorists no doubt logically assume that the taxes they pay at a gas pump will be spent to improve their driving conditions. Add lanes, widen interchanges, fill potholes. Even make it easier to ride a bus or light rail. Whether they all assume that or not, it's the way this tax money should be spent--benefiting the stressed motorists who pay it. After all it is, in effect, a user fee. At issue is not the 36-cent fuel tax on each gallon of gasoline--half state, half fed.
NEWS
October 14, 1987 | DAN MORAIN, Times Staff Writer
As debates go, it might not have ranked among the best of all time. But few debates have ever had a more majestic backdrop for photo opportunities. Interior Secretary Donald P. Hodel, standing atop the dam that holds most of San Francisco's water, told the city's mayor, Dianne Feinstein, on Tuesday that he remained intent on studying the dismantling of 420-foot-high O'Shaughnessy Dam and creating another valley for campers in the heavily used national park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 9, 2004 | George Skelton
On reflection, demoting California's Legislature to part-time status sounded like a better idea last summer than it does today. That's probably because there are more signs of potential reform now than there were in the pre-Schwarzenegger era. It may also be because the notion of a part-time Legislature has started to look like a real possibility. And, in the harsh reality of daylight, this picture is not pretty. It's tainted with corruption, for starters. I plead guilty.
NEWS
July 6, 1989
A landmark law that gives municipal sanction to unmarried but cohabitating couples, homosexual and heterosexual, has taken effect in San Francisco. The law permits unmarried couples to register their partnerships, similar to filing marriage licenses, to be declared "domestic partners." The legislation also grants hospital visitation rights and bereavement leave for city employees.
OPINION
November 28, 1999 | D.J. Waldie, D.J. Waldie, a city official in Lakewood, is the author of "Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir."
In California, at least, the season of its cities has finally arrived. In causes big and small, voters more and more conceive their political lives within municipal boundaries. Blame the state's boomers again, who are passing into their prime voting years, cocooning for the long haul into old age and redrawing the circle of their concerns within the limits of communities and neighborhoods. Thomas P. "Tip" ONeill's truism that "all politics is local" isn't about ward heeling any more.
HEALTH
July 7, 2008 | Shari Roan, Times Staff Writer
STAY home if you're sick. That's the best way to stop the spread of contagious diseases, such as influenza, tuberculosis and gastrointestinal viruses. Besides, you can't do your job capably or safely if you don't feel well. But many Americans simply tough it out when ill, going to work with pain, cramps, headaches, fevers or worse. Often, they have no choice. As many as 43% of American workers in private industry don't have paid sick days, according to 2007 data from the federal government.
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