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NEWS
February 2, 1991
The CALIFORNIA ASSEMBLY, in a 57-to-3 vote, approved a resolution this week SUPPORTING PRESIDENT BUSH'S CONDUCT OF THE WAR against Iraq and honoring American troops in the Middle East. The only opposition to the resolution by Republican Assemblyman Gil Ferguson of Newport Beach--a retired Marine officer who served in three wars--came from liberal Democrats who objected to clauses that declared Bush had "exhausted every reasonable means" to get Iraq out of Kuwait without force.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Rosanna Xia, Rong-Gong Lin II and Doug Smith
A state lawmaker is introducing a bill that would close a loophole that has allowed developers to build projects on or near dangerous earthquake faults. California law already bans the construction of new buildings on top of faults that have been zoned by the state. But more than two dozen major faults have not been zoned, and a Times review found some buildings had been constructed along them. Statewide, about 2,000 of California's 7,000 miles of faults have not been zoned, and the building ban is not enforced in those areas.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — Politicians utter thousands of words — in speeches, debates, advertisements — but the most important may be the handful they use on the ballot to describe their day jobs. Those three or so words may never have been as critical as they are this year in California. That's especially true for candidates not as well known as, say, Jerry Brown, who ran for governor as the state's attorney general two years ago, or Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose ballot designation in the 2003 recall race was "actor/businessman.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 20, 2012 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO — Politicians utter thousands of words — in speeches, debates, advertisements — but the most important may be the handful they use on the ballot to describe their day jobs. Those three or so words may never have been as critical as they are this year in California. That's especially true for candidates not as well known as, say, Jerry Brown, who ran for governor as the state's attorney general two years ago, or Arnold Schwarzenegger, whose ballot designation in the 2003 recall race was "actor/businessman.
NEWS
March 20, 1997 | CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gov. Pete Wilson and legislative leaders have told the Clinton administration they are confident that California will comply with the federal "smoke a joint, lose your license" law by April 7. Unless California obeys the statute, the state stands to lose at least $92 million in U.S. highway construction and maintenance funds this year, 10% of its total allotment. Since 1991, the federal anti-drug law has given states a choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 1999 | NICHOLAS RICCARDI and JIM NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A state legislator with ties to developer Ed Roski Jr. told a closed-door meeting of the Coliseum Commission on Wednesday that he plans to introduce legislation that would shift control of the panel to Sacramento.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
An insurance industry-backed bill that would make it easier for auto insurers to persuade motorists to fix their dents only at company-selected garages won a key vote Friday in the state Senate and should be on the governor's desk next week. Insurers say the bill is needed so that they can give policyholders full information about the benefits of having work done at select auto body shops. Those advantages include lifetime guarantees, fast turnarounds and quality repairs, the insurers say. But opponents -- an unlikely coalition of car dealers, auto body shops, trial attorneys and consumer activists -- contend the bill would weaken safeguards against "steering," an illegal practice in which motorists are pushed with a combination of economic incentives and penalties into taking their cars to certain body shops.
NATIONAL
January 6, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
A group of state legislators came to Washington on Wednesday to unveil legal language they say is a blueprint for states to pass immigration laws that might force a Supreme Court review of the 14th Amendment, which grants U.S. citizenship to any child born on U.S. soil, regardless of the parents' citizenship. The group is pushing state legislation that would take two approaches: It would create two tiers of birth certificates, one of which states would produce only for babies born to U.S. citizens and legal residents; and it would attempt to skirt laws stipulating that the federal government defines U.S. citizenship by adding a second level of "state" citizenship.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2000 | JILL LEOVY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) is seeking state funds to purchase the site of the historic Van de Kamp's Bakery in Glassell Park for possible use as a Los Angeles Community College District satellite campus.
BUSINESS
July 18, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A controversial proposal to give states broader authority to tax Internet and catalog sales appears to have stalled again in Congress, raising doubts about whether a compromise can be reached by the fall as supporters had hoped. Key members of the Senate Commerce Committee are trying to insert the provision into a bill that would extend the current moratorium on new Internet access taxes. But the senators--Byron L. Dorgan (D-N.D.), Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), John McCain (R-Ariz.) and John F.
BUSINESS
January 10, 2012
Used-car dealers known as Buy Here Pay Here lots would be regulated by the state as lenders under new legislation aimed at curbing what some critics say are abusive and predatory lending practices. The bill, SB 956, would require Buy Here Pay Here dealers to be regulated by the Department of Corporations as lenders. That's because, unlike conventional dealerships, they finance car purchases themselves, offering buyers what are essentially installment plans. "What Buy Here Pay Here dealers are doing is in fact a form of lending" said state Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance)
NATIONAL
January 6, 2011 | By Brian Bennett, Washington Bureau
A group of state legislators came to Washington on Wednesday to unveil legal language they say is a blueprint for states to pass immigration laws that might force a Supreme Court review of the 14th Amendment, which grants U.S. citizenship to any child born on U.S. soil, regardless of the parents' citizenship. The group is pushing state legislation that would take two approaches: It would create two tiers of birth certificates, one of which states would produce only for babies born to U.S. citizens and legal residents; and it would attempt to skirt laws stipulating that the federal government defines U.S. citizenship by adding a second level of "state" citizenship.
OPINION
March 10, 2010
The self-outing of state Sen. Roy Ashburn, who confessed that he is gay on a right-wing talk-radio program Monday, was undoubtedly agonizing -- not only for Ashburn but for his family (the divorced senator has four daughters). But although we sympathize with Ashburn and hope he can turn his life in a more positive direction following this revelation, there's really no excusing his political hypocrisy. Ashburn, a Republican from conservative Bakersfield, has a deeply anti-gay voting record.
BUSINESS
September 5, 2009 | Marc Lifsher
An insurance industry-backed bill that would make it easier for auto insurers to persuade motorists to fix their dents only at company-selected garages won a key vote Friday in the state Senate and should be on the governor's desk next week. Insurers say the bill is needed so that they can give policyholders full information about the benefits of having work done at select auto body shops. Those advantages include lifetime guarantees, fast turnarounds and quality repairs, the insurers say. But opponents -- an unlikely coalition of car dealers, auto body shops, trial attorneys and consumer activists -- contend the bill would weaken safeguards against "steering," an illegal practice in which motorists are pushed with a combination of economic incentives and penalties into taking their cars to certain body shops.
OPINION
July 25, 2008
If it was all about getting the Legislature's attention, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's plan to cut state workers' pay to the federal minimum wage succeeded admirably. Democrats responded with shock. Republicans responded with incredulity. But so far, neither side has responded with a budget. Lawmakers could honestly point out that they and their staffs haven't been getting any pay since July 1, the long-since-lapsed constitutional deadline for Schwarzenegger to sign into law a budget for the fiscal year currently underway.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 2005 | Evan Halper, Times Staff Writer
Republicans in the Legislature spoiled an effort by Democrats to meet Wednesday's constitutional deadline for passing a state budget, calling the plan too expensive -- although it differed little from the one proposed by the Republican governor a month ago. Only eight Republican votes were needed for lawmakers to approve the $115.7-billion budget bill and send it to the governor's desk for his signature.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | SUE FOX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A state lawmaker who hopes to become mayor of the proposed San Fernando Valley city moved Thursday to protect Valley ratepayers from what he said would be unfair water and power prices in the event the region secedes from Los Angeles. State Sen. Richard Alarcon (D-Sylmar) said he was incensed at the possibility that Los Angeles might try to charge higher utility rates in areas that leave the city. He introduced legislation Thursday to prohibit cities from doing just that.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2001 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The AARP stepped up its fight against unscrupulous mortgage lenders Tuesday by launching a national campaign against "predatory" lending and pushing for passage in California of a bill that would restrict how home loans are made in the state. The bill, which has been introduced in the state Senate, and the campaign target lenders that make high-cost loans to borrowers, hoping to eventually seize their homes.
NATIONAL
February 26, 2005 | P.J. Huffstutter and Stephanie Simon, Times Staff Writers
The law in Kansas is explicit: A fetus old enough to survive outside the womb cannot be aborted -- unless continuing the pregnancy would endanger the woman's life or irreversibly harm her physical or mental health. In demanding access to the medical records of women who had late-term abortions, Kansas Atty. Gen. Phill Kline suggested this week that doctors might be violating that law by aborting viable fetuses too freely.
NEWS
September 29, 2002 | PETER PRENGAMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS WRITER
A clause in Oregon's constitution declares that the only blacks allowed to live in the state are slaves. The provision was rendered obsolete in 1868, but it has remained on the books for nearly 150 years. On Nov. 5, Oregonians will vote on a measure to remove that provision and other discriminatory language from the constitution.
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