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October 23, 1991 | Agence France-Presse
The Ukrainian Parliament ratified two bills Tuesday to create a national armed force in the republic. The bills authorize a force of 400,000 to 420,000, define national military structures and put the army under the control of the Ukrainian Parliament until the election of a president on Dec. 1. The creation of a national armed force was set out in Ukraine's declaration of independence Aug. 24. With a population of 52 million, the Ukraine is the Soviet Union's second-most-populous republic.
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NEWS
October 23, 1991 | Agence France-Presse
The Ukrainian Parliament ratified two bills Tuesday to create a national armed force in the republic. The bills authorize a force of 400,000 to 420,000, define national military structures and put the army under the control of the Ukrainian Parliament until the election of a president on Dec. 1. The creation of a national armed force was set out in Ukraine's declaration of independence Aug. 24. With a population of 52 million, the Ukraine is the Soviet Union's second-most-populous republic.
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NEWS
January 11, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Russian and Ukrainian foreign ministers, seeking to resolve an escalating dispute between their governments over control of the Black Sea Fleet, called Friday for negotiations that would satisfy both sides. "On the Black Sea Fleet issue, I think that solutions can be found that would be acceptable to all sides," Ukrainian Foreign Minister Anatoly Zlenko said just before a meeting of foreign ministers of the Commonwealth of Independent States opened in Moscow.
OPINION
November 27, 1994 | Charles A. Kupchan, Charles A. Kupchan, senior fellow for Europe at the Council on Foreign Relations and a professor at Georgetown University, was on the staff of the National Security Council for the first year of the Clinton Administration. He is author of "The Vulnerability of Empire" (Cornell University Press).
As the leader of a country in the midst of an identity crisis, Ukrainian President Leonid D. Kuchma visited the White House last week with an unusual mission. Because Ukraine is still uncertain whether to orient its economy and foreign policy eastward or westward, Kuchma looked to President Bill Clinton to help his country find its way in post-Cold War Europe. Economic reform, financial assistance and Ukraine's pledge to rid itself of nuclear weapons were all key features of the agenda.
WORLD
November 27, 2004 | David Holley, Times Staff Writer
This bitterly divided nation increasingly appeared headed toward a rerun of a disputed presidential election after President Leonid D. Kuchma met Friday with European and Russian envoys and rival presidential contenders to seek a peaceful resolution to the crisis. All sides "stand against any use of force that may lead to escalation of the conflict and bloodshed," Kuchma said after 2 1/2 hours of talks at the Mariinsky presidential palace. Kuchma did not detail a possible peaceful way out.
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