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NEWS
August 28, 1994 | KAREN TUMULTY and EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Through the squalls and storms of the past few months, no one has been more doggedly upbeat about President Clinton's ambitious plan for national health care reform than senior adviser Ira Magaziner and First Lady Hillary Rodham Clinton. Magaziner, chief architect of Clinton's health care plan, took great delight in calling attention to his office bookshelves.
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NEWS
April 27, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At a time when Congress is stalemated on a spate of issues, one measure is an eye-catching exception: a major rewrite of federal farm policy. While most other major legislation seems doomed to election-year oblivion, congressional negotiators put the finishing touches Friday on a bill that would increase agriculture subsidies a staggering 70% over the next decade.
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NEWS
April 29, 1997 | FAYE FIORE
By all indications, it looked like it was going to be a Wednesday afternoon session of vacation slides from hell. There we were, holed up on a lovely spring day in the Capitol Hill office of Rep. Bob Filner, San Diego Democrat, while he described snapshots of his recent trip to the Philippines. Everybody got their own set. "Bob and Jane Filner enjoy breakfast with the Sons and Daughters of World War II veterans. . . .
NEWS
April 26, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate approved a bill Thursday that would revamp the nation's energy policy, paving the way for talks with the House on one of President Bush's domestic priorities. The bill is a mix of relatively modest steps geared more toward promoting conservation and the use of alternative power sources. The House bill, taking its cue from Bush, is tilted more toward increasing production.
NEWS
January 26, 2000 | ART PINE and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Clinton said Tuesday that the budget he will send Congress on Feb. 7 will propose paying off the entire $3.6-trillion national debt by 2013--two years earlier than had been expected even a few months ago. At a news conference, the president attributed the opportunity for a speedup to an economy that is even stronger than had been forecast, resulting in higher tax revenue and lower expenses, and to his own austere budget policies.
NEWS
August 10, 1989 | BEVERLY BEYETTE, Times Staff Writer
Howard and Connie Clery were delighted when their only daughter, Jeanne, told them of her decision to enroll at Lehigh, a small private co-educational university in Bethlehem, Pa., little more than an hour from home. Had she chosen to follow in the footsteps of her two brothers, Jeanne might have gone off to New Orleans, to Tulane, which was so far away. Yes, the Clerys agreed, Lehigh was perfect. "The minute she saw Lehigh she fell in love with it," Connie Clery remembers.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | BRIAN MOOAR, WASHINGTON POST
It took some searching, but Richard Swain found the coat he was looking for last month at a store in Greenbelt, Md. The black, fur-trimmed parka resembled others on the racks, but the tag was unsettling. It said the trim was "Mongolia Dog Fur." The find was a coup for Swain, chief investigator for the Humane Society of the United States, which is wrapping up an 18-month undercover probe into what it says is an extensive worldwide trade in the pelts of domesticated dogs.
NEWS
November 18, 1993 | JAMES GERSTENZANG and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A painfully divided House of Representatives approved the North American Free Trade Agreement by an unexpectedly large margin Wednesday night, ending a hard-fought battle that grew into a referendum on the fundamental changes sweeping the American economy. The vote was 234 to 200, 16 more than the 218 needed for passage. The Senate is expected to act on the measure within days. Passage there is not in doubt.
NEWS
March 13, 1990 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Crawling up the Capitol steps to dramatize the barriers confronting them, scores of disabled persons rallied Monday to protest delays in congressional action on a Senate-passed bill to expand their access to jobs, transportation and public services. The legislation, endorsed by President Bush, has broad bipartisan backing but has been moving at glacial speed through four House committees since it was approved overwhelmingly by the Senate last September.
BUSINESS
July 5, 1994 | DONALD W. NAUSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the picket line outside Caterpillar's sprawling tractor plant, John McCoy uses his head to display his disdain for his employer of 29 years: He wears a John Deere cap. Just up the street, a union billboard painted in Caterpillar's bold yellow colors announces: "You are entering a war zone. Caterpillar vs. its UAW employees." Such are the symbols of the nation's longest ongoing labor confrontation.
NEWS
April 9, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The House is poised this week to approve legislation that would ease donation-reporting rules for a broad class of political groups, opening a new front in the campaign finance debate. Critics say the measure, coming just weeks after the enactment of a landmark law to limit donations to national political parties, could encourage certain groups to receive huge contributions from wealthy donors while escaping effective scrutiny.
NEWS
April 7, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, a conservative analyst named David M. Mason penned a critique of the campaign reform movement titled "Why Congress Can't Ban Soft Money." Earlier this year, as lawmakers sought to prove him wrong, he attacked elements of their reform bill as "unworkable or unenforceable."
NEWS
April 6, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As taxpayers approach their annual day of reckoning, House Republicans plan to act on two bills in the next two weeks that would bolster taxpayer rights and make permanent last year's major tax cuts. The votes, on either side of April 15, will enable the GOP to spotlight its stance on taxes in an election year when many voters are worried about a still-fragile economy. Both bills are favored to win approval in the Republican-led House, though the vote on tax cuts could be close.
NEWS
March 19, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
While Democrats launched a final push Monday for legislation to limit the influence of big-money donors, party officials said one contributor has given several million dollars this year to help build a national Democratic headquarters. The gift, when confirmed in federal disclosure reports due to become public next month, will apparently be the largest of the past decade to either of the major national parties.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six months after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks postponed a brewing debate on immigration reform, the House today is expected to approve a measure backed by President Bush to help certain immigrants stay in the United States while they seek legal residency. The House action comes after Bush prodded Republican leaders to pass the measure before he makes a four-day swing next week through Mexico, Peru and El Salvador. The measure has strong bipartisan support in the Senate.
NEWS
March 12, 2002 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN and RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For weeks, President Bush and Democratic leaders have framed the energy legislation pending in Congress this week as a form of homeland defense: a way to reduce America's reliance on oil from the turbulent Middle East. But now, the Senate appears poised to reject the principal ideas of each side for maximizing America's energy independence. In a form of mutually assured destruction, the central proposals for increasing both domestic energy production and conservation look doomed.
MAGAZINE
April 25, 1993 | RANDY SHILTS, This article is adapted from "Conduct Unbecoming: Gays and Lesbians in the U.S. Military," copyright 1993 by Randy Shilts, reprinted with permission from St. Martin's Press. Shilts' previous book was "And the Band Played On: Politics, People and the AIDS Epidemic." He lives in San Francisco.
Much of the current debate over gays and lesbians in the U.S. armed forces has been entirely irrelevant to the genuine problems posed by excluding them. Opponents of lifting the ban on homosexuals in the military talk incessantly of the problems posed by gays' announcing their sexuality. This betrays an appalling ignorance of how the ban actually functions. Ever since the anti-gay regulations were first enacted in 1943, they created a dilemma for military investigators. How do you find gays?
NEWS
August 13, 1991 | PETER CARLIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Since her daughter was shot to death, Danna Schaeffer hasn't thought twice about jumping into the line of fire. Last spring, the petite woman with short red hair bounced to her feet in a suburban Oregon church auditorium filled with angry gun-control opponents. Without blinking, Schaeffer faced the crowd and said exactly what they didn't want to hear. Earlier, the rage in the town meeting had been aimed at Rep. Les AuCoin (D-Ore.
NEWS
March 9, 2002 | RICHARD SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A measure that would require a nationwide increase in the use of ethanol in gasoline gained momentum in the Senate on Friday, despite warnings it could lead to gasoline price spikes and supply shortages in California. The measure, expected to be included in a comprehensive energy bill before the Senate, is one of the few issues in a contentious debate on energy policy that has brought together Democratic and Republican lawmakers.
NEWS
March 8, 2002 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After months of fruitless partisan bickering, the House on Thursday overwhelmingly approved a stripped-down bill to bolster the economy by providing new unemployment benefits and modest business tax breaks, including one eagerly sought by the high-technology industry. The Democratic-controlled Senate is expected to pass the bill today, and President Bush said he would sign it. Congressional debate over how to strengthen the economy has raged for so long that it may have outlasted the recession.
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