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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2002 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
An energy industry whistle-blower told state senators Monday that natural gas traders across the nation commonly lied about their transactions to drive market prices and boost profits. The testimony portrayed a rotten underpinning to the energy industry, with widespread manipulation of even the prices published in newsletters that traders and regulators use to determine long-term contract prices and the rates charged to consumers.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Citing the recent death of a baggage handler at Los Angeles International Airport, state legislators on Friday called for committee hearings to assess worker safety at California airports. Although Cal/OSHA is looking into the death of Cesar A. Valenzuela on Feb. 21, a group of lawmakers announced at a news conference in downtown Los Angeles that they would conduct a wider investigation. "This is a horrible tragedy and we must find out if this could have been prevented," said state Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance)
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NEWS
December 20, 1997 | MYRNA OLIVER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Caryl Warner, who with 64 years in practice was among the longest-serving lawyers in California, has died. He was 89. Warner, who held a license to practice law from 1929 until his retirement in 1993, died Wednesday at the home of his son Caryl Christopher in Asheville, N.C., said another son, Dr. Richard Warner of Los Angeles, on Friday.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Personal information collected from credit card shoppers would be better protected by upgrading the country's entire payment system to technology that has dramatically reduced fraud in Europe. That was the consensus of a group of retailers, bankers, credit card companies and consumer advocates at a legislative hearing Tuesday. Legislators delved into the causes of a recent hacking of about 70 million computerized customer records at Target Corp. and a smaller incident involving about 1.1 million customers at Neiman Marcus department stores.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 30, 1994 | CHUCK PHILIPS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rock 'n' roll returns to Capitol Hill today, but this time it's not over record labeling. Instead, the House Government Operations subcommittee will convene to hear testimony about how the $1-billion concert industry operates in the United States. The hearing follows a complaint filed by the best-selling band in the U.S., Pearl Jam, against Ticketmaster, the largest ticket company in the business.
NEWS
August 12, 1992 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ross Perot told a Senate committee Tuesday there is "overwhelming" evidence the United States left POWs behind in Laos after the Vietnam War and that officials in successive administrations "covered up, dissembled and finessed" this dark truth for more than 20 years.
NEWS
July 20, 1995 | GLENN F. BUNTING and DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A teen-age girl's gripping account Wednesday of being forced at age 10 to have sex in a hotel room with Branch Davidian cult leader David Koresh effectively muted criticism of federal law enforcement agents on the first day of congressional hearings into the tragic 1993 siege of the cult's compound near Waco, Tex.
NEWS
July 30, 1998 | MARK ARAX and MARK GLADSTONE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two former supervisors and a former guard at Corcoran State Prison told a legislative hearing Wednesday that their attempts to draw attention to questionable inmate shooting deaths by guards were ignored at the highest levels of the state Department of Corrections, as well as by an official in the Wilson administration. With nowhere else to turn, Facility Capt. Ralph Mineau, former Lt.
NEWS
May 25, 2000 | GEORGE SKELTON
"The accumulation of all powers legislative, executive and judiciary in the same hands . . . may justly be pronounced the very definition of tyranny." --James Madison, "The Federalist Papers" * State Insurance Commissioner Chuck Quackenbush should have listened up in government class. He should have paid attention to those lectures about checks and balances, about separation of powers. If he had, it's doubtful that today he'd need a criminal defense attorney.
NEWS
August 29, 1997 | DAVID WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
His boss is James T. Riady, the elusive billionaire who refuses to answer Senate investigators' questions about his relationship with President Clinton. Another of his longtime superiors was John Huang, the fallen Democratic fund-raiser who also is refusing to talk. In fact, James E. Per Lee, president and chief executive officer of LippoBank California, has spent more time with Riady and Huang than any federal agent or congressional staffer assigned to the campaign finance investigations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Inmates leading California's largest prison protest ended a two-month hunger strike Thursday without winning major concessions on solitary confinement conditions - their main grievance - but with the promise of legislative hearings on the issue. The strike, which began with 30,000 inmates refusing meals and ended with about 100, drew international attention to California's use of prolonged prisoner isolation. It was orchestrated by a few inmates in isolation at Pelican Bay prison near the Oregon border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Last week's FBI raid of the office of Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello) has the Capitol on edge. That was clear Wednesday when the first words of Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) to a committee considering one of his bills was to assure the panel it was not tied to the FBI investigation. Lara's bill, SB 146, would scale back a requirement that medical service providers, when seeking reimbursement for workers compensation claims, include certain documents that detail the services and costs, including a copy of the prescription for pharmaceutical services.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Uriel Alberto would seem to be a strong candidate for the recent federal policy change that temporarily protects certain young, undocumented immigrants from deportation. Thousands of applicants lined up last week to file forms under the new policy, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. It offers a two-year waiver from deportation to immigrants aged 30 and younger who were brought to the U.S. by their parents before age 16. Alberto, 25, moved to the U.S. illegally from Mexico with his immigrant parents at age 7. He graduated from a U.S. high school - another requirement of the new policy - where he was a track standout.
BUSINESS
November 17, 2011 | Jessica Guynn
Sen. Jay Rockefeller (D-W.Va.), chairman of the Commerce, Science and Transportation Committee, said he would hold a hearing to look into reports that Facebook tracks its users on the Web after they log out. "No company should track customers without their knowledge or consent, especially a company with 800 million users and a trove of unique personal data on its users," Rockefeller said in a statement Wednesday. "If Facebook or any other company is falsely leading people to believe that they can log out of the site and not be tracked, that is alarming.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2009 | Shane Goldmacher and Patrick McGreevy
An Orange County lawmaker who inadvertently broadcast explicit remarks about his sexual conquests over an open microphone during a lull in a Sacramento hearing abruptly resigned from office this afternoon. Assemblyman Mike Duvall (R-Yorba Linda) stepped down after legislative leaders stripped him of his committee posts this morning and launched an ethics probe of his actions. "I am deeply saddened that my inappropriate comments have become a major distraction for my colleagues in the Assembly, who are working hard on the very serious problems facing our state," Duvall said in a written statement.
NATIONAL
April 25, 2009 | James Oliphant
Congress is unlikely to form an independent panel to study the Bush administration's program of harsh interrogations of terrorism suspects now that President Obama and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid have voiced opposition to the idea. Reid (D-Nev.) said he preferred to allow the Senate Intelligence Committee to finish its investigation of the Bush-era practices before taking further action. That could take the rest of the year, he said.
SPORTS
June 26, 2007 | Greg Johnson, Times Staff Writer
Brent Boyd was a 23-year-old rookie scrambling to stick with the Minnesota Vikings when he suffered his first concussion as a professional football player. Nearly three decades later, the preseason-game collision that left Boyd temporarily blind in one eye continues to haunt. "I couldn't tell you how many [concussions] I had," said Boyd, who was born in Downey, graduated with honors from UCLA and spent six years as an NFL offensive lineman. "We didn't count them.
NEWS
October 17, 1996 | AMY WALLACE, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Even before anyone testified Wednesday, it was clear that Assemblyman Bernie Richter (R-Chico) wanted his "investigative" hearing on race and gender preferences to be unlike any other. For starters, the first witness, Cal State Northridge President Blenda J. Wilson, was sworn to tell the truth--a formality rarely employed in legislative hearings. Then, in a stunning departure from the norm, Wilson was asked whether she was on drugs.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
Rep. Hilda L. Solis (D-El Monte) edged closer to winning confirmation as the nation's Labor secretary, with the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee clearing her nomination in a voice vote. Only two Republicans voted against her. The full Senate is expected to vote this week. Meanwhile, the Senate voted 93-4 to confirm William Lynn III as deputy Defense secretary, endorsing President Obama's decision to waive ethics regulations by putting a former defense lobbyist in charge of day-to-day operations at the Pentagon.
NATIONAL
January 15, 2009 | Kathy Kristof, Kathy Kristof is a personal-finance author and syndicated columnist.
The numerous errors on Timothy F. Geithner's income tax returns had tax accountants debating Wednesday whether the missteps were innocent, cheating or simply the result of the overly complicated tax code. Geithner's political fate -- he is President-elect Barack Obama's choice as Treasury secretary, putting him in charge of the IRS -- lies in balance. But it's not an easy call. Tax experts said that the issues that tripped up Geithner were complex enough to befuddle many taxpayers.
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