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NEWS
October 15, 1991 | RICH CONNELL and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Texas businessman John N. Doggett III, who strode into the spotlight of the Clarence Thomas controversy to allege that Anita Faye Hill "fantasized" about him, is a bright, self-assured professional, but also given to self-promotion and pomposity, those who know him said Monday. The 43-year-old management consultant and part-time professor from Austin, Tex.
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NEWS
December 7, 1995 | GEBE MARTINEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Oregon mother, her voice filled with emotion, told a congressional panel Wednesday how her son was so anguished over society's intolerance toward gays like himself that he killed himself by leaping off a freeway overpass and into the path of an 18-wheel truck. "Bobby needed an education free of the nagging fear that his difference would be discovered," Mary Griffith testified. "He needed to be respected and valued by his family and his community."
NEWS
May 18, 1996 | ROBERT L. JACKSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republicans on the Senate Whitewater Committee charged Friday that there were flaws and limits in an official report the White House has claimed clears President and Mrs. Clinton of wrongdoing in the Whitewater case. The focus of the committee's attention was a report prepared for the Resolution Trust Corp. at a cost of nearly $4 million by a San Francisco-based law firm that spent two years examining Madison Guaranty Savings & Loan, the failed Little Rock, Ark.
NEWS
October 18, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two state inspectors, describing the regulation of California funeral homes as a "joke," testified Thursday that their critical inspection reports on mortuaries were routinely ignored by supervisors who took no action. Donald Hudgens, an inspector with the Board of Funeral Directors and Embalmers, said state regulation of the industry has been so lax that funeral homes often repeatedly violate rules because they know that no disciplinary action will be filed against them.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 1996 | Glenn Lovell, Glenn Lovell, film critic for the San Jose Mercury News and Knight-Ridder Newspapers, is currently on a National Arts Journalism Fellowship at USC
Still plenty hard-nosed, like one of his hellbent heroes, Edward Dmytryk isn't ready to concede that he entered into the Hollywood version of a Faustian bargain to save his skin. "Oh, God, that's the way the left-wing journalists have always described it," moans the 87-year-old filmmaker between classes at USC, where he teaches directing and editing. "That's all bolshi talk."
NEWS
October 14, 1991 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The announcement that Anita Faye Hill had taken and passed a lie detector test on her allegations of sexual harassment against Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas caused an uproar Sunday on the Senate Judiciary Committee, but experts were quick to point out that while the polygraph is considered a valuable investigative tool its accuracy can vary widely.
NEWS
October 3, 1991 | DARA McLEOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Willie Harris, once a strong, able-bodied serviceman with plans to play professional basketball, testified Wednesday that Air Force doctors wrecked his knees--along with his career plans--by administering repeated injections of cortisone.
NEWS
March 31, 2000 | By NORMAN KEMPSTER,
Summoned by one of the harshest critics of the United Nations, all 15 members of the Security Council trooped to Washington on Thursday to exchange views--and display pique--with members of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee. Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), who invited the council members to the Capitol after scolding them on their own turf two months ago, urged panel members and the visiting diplomats to "agree to disagree agreeably." Mostly, they did that.
SPORTS
February 12, 2008 | Bill Shaikin, Times Staff Writer
WASHINGTON -- Barry Bonds will not appear before Congress on Wednesday. Roger Clemens will be the star baseball player under oath, and he has vowed to testify he never used steroids. But as Bonds awaits trial on charges that he lied under oath when he told a federal grand jury he had never knowingly used steroids, the credibility of those charges could be enhanced or weakened by how Clemens emerges from his testimony, according to one House member who will hear him Wednesday.
SPORTS
February 14, 2008 | Helene Elliott
It took four hours and 41 minutes -- about as long as the average Yankees-Red Sox game -- for an overriding truth to emerge from Wednesday's hearing before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. The investigation into steroid use in baseball should not have come to this, a made-for-TV tragicomedy of sometimes fumbling questions and evasive answers timed by an impatient gavel.
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