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NEWS
March 2, 1996 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
One of President Clinton's top aides, after telling Congress he didn't take notes on a key Whitewater strategy meeting, belatedly produced his long-sought papers. The notes by senior White House advisor Bruce Lindsey were faxed to the Senate Banking Committee after his attorney, Allen Snyder, said he found them among papers that Lindsey had turned over to him months ago. Lindsey had told the Senate Whitewater Committee on Jan. 16: "I don't remember taking specific notes" at a Nov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Citing the recent death of a baggage handler at Los Angeles International Airport, state legislators on Friday called for committee hearings to assess worker safety at California airports. Although Cal/OSHA is looking into the death of Cesar A. Valenzuela on Feb. 21, a group of lawmakers announced at a news conference in downtown Los Angeles that they would conduct a wider investigation. "This is a horrible tragedy and we must find out if this could have been prevented," said state Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Last week's FBI raid of the office of Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello) has the Capitol on edge. That was clear Wednesday when the first words of Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) to a committee considering one of his bills was to assure the panel it was not tied to the FBI investigation. Lara's bill, SB 146, would scale back a requirement that medical service providers, when seeking reimbursement for workers compensation claims, include certain documents that detail the services and costs, including a copy of the prescription for pharmaceutical services.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2014 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Personal information collected from credit card shoppers would be better protected by upgrading the country's entire payment system to technology that has dramatically reduced fraud in Europe. That was the consensus of a group of retailers, bankers, credit card companies and consumer advocates at a legislative hearing Tuesday. Legislators delved into the causes of a recent hacking of about 70 million computerized customer records at Target Corp. and a smaller incident involving about 1.1 million customers at Neiman Marcus department stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Citing the recent death of a baggage handler at Los Angeles International Airport, state legislators on Friday called for committee hearings to assess worker safety at California airports. Although Cal/OSHA is looking into the death of Cesar A. Valenzuela on Feb. 21, a group of lawmakers announced at a news conference in downtown Los Angeles that they would conduct a wider investigation. "This is a horrible tragedy and we must find out if this could have been prevented," said state Sen. Ted Lieu (D-Torrance)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1998
The state Assembly's Select Committee on the Compton Unified School District conducted the first in a series of public hearings Wednesday evening. The hearing, at district headquarters, offered parents and local residents a chance to hear updated reports from state and district officials regarding the school system, which was taken over by state administrators in 1993.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2002 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
An energy industry whistle-blower told state senators Monday that natural gas traders across the nation commonly lied about their transactions to drive market prices and boost profits. The testimony portrayed a rotten underpinning to the energy industry, with widespread manipulation of even the prices published in newsletters that traders and regulators use to determine long-term contract prices and the rates charged to consumers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1997
Two state legislators on Friday formally requested an investigative hearing on the Los Angeles Unified School District's proposed downtown high school. Assemblyman Antonio Villaraigosa (D-Los Angeles) joined state Sen. Richard Polanco (D-Los Angeles) in asking for the hearing before the Senate Education Committee.
NEWS
March 18, 1985
"Robert has organic brain damage. I have seen Robert on my short time on the bench approximately eight or nine times for minor offenses, often accompanied by failures to appear, because Robert can't remember where the courthouse is. . . . "We sent him to a residential treatment program in San Francisco, because they promised us they would take him. Because he had other problems and . . . his (medication) wore off, they took one look at him and Robert was not acceptable to the program.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potatoes, onions and other basic commodities hardly seem like risky items for supermarkets to stock. However, growers say they are increasingly being charged tens of thousands of dollars in upfront fees usually reserved for food manufacturers introducing unfamiliar products such as a new flavor of ketchup or variety of potato chip. Growers, regulators and others will gather today in a U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Inmates leading California's largest prison protest ended a two-month hunger strike Thursday without winning major concessions on solitary confinement conditions - their main grievance - but with the promise of legislative hearings on the issue. The strike, which began with 30,000 inmates refusing meals and ended with about 100, drew international attention to California's use of prolonged prisoner isolation. It was orchestrated by a few inmates in isolation at Pelican Bay prison near the Oregon border.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
Last week's FBI raid of the office of Sen. Ron Calderon (D-Montebello) has the Capitol on edge. That was clear Wednesday when the first words of Sen. Ricardo Lara (D-Bell Gardens) to a committee considering one of his bills was to assure the panel it was not tied to the FBI investigation. Lara's bill, SB 146, would scale back a requirement that medical service providers, when seeking reimbursement for workers compensation claims, include certain documents that detail the services and costs, including a copy of the prescription for pharmaceutical services.
NATIONAL
August 19, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C. - Uriel Alberto would seem to be a strong candidate for the recent federal policy change that temporarily protects certain young, undocumented immigrants from deportation. Thousands of applicants lined up last week to file forms under the new policy, Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. It offers a two-year waiver from deportation to immigrants aged 30 and younger who were brought to the U.S. by their parents before age 16. Alberto, 25, moved to the U.S. illegally from Mexico with his immigrant parents at age 7. He graduated from a U.S. high school - another requirement of the new policy - where he was a track standout.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 10, 2009 | Shane Goldmacher and Patrick McGreevy
An Orange County lawmaker who inadvertently broadcast explicit remarks about his sexual conquests over an open microphone during a lull in a Sacramento hearing abruptly resigned from office this afternoon. Assemblyman Mike Duvall (R-Yorba Linda) stepped down after legislative leaders stripped him of his committee posts this morning and launched an ethics probe of his actions. "I am deeply saddened that my inappropriate comments have become a major distraction for my colleagues in the Assembly, who are working hard on the very serious problems facing our state," Duvall said in a written statement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2006 | Steve Hymon, Times Staff Writer
Voting on a matter in which it has no real say but a decided political stake, the Los Angeles City Council on Friday unanimously endorsed Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa's plan to gain some control over the city's public schools. Though it was a symbolic victory, Villaraigosa treated it as a significant milestone after months of lobbying the council to support a bill in the Legislature that would give him a measure of power over the Los Angeles Unified School District.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2004 | Jeffrey L. Rabin, Times Staff Writer
A Schwarzenegger administration official told state lawmakers Thursday there had been no system of financial accountability at the state's troubled Department of Corrections in recent years and that cost overruns may exceed half a billion dollars this year alone. Officials blamed those overruns on intentional under-budgeting by former Gov. Gray Davis and lax controls over spending by wardens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2013 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - Inmates leading California's largest prison protest ended a two-month hunger strike Thursday without winning major concessions on solitary confinement conditions - their main grievance - but with the promise of legislative hearings on the issue. The strike, which began with 30,000 inmates refusing meals and ended with about 100, drew international attention to California's use of prolonged prisoner isolation. It was orchestrated by a few inmates in isolation at Pelican Bay prison near the Oregon border.
BUSINESS
May 24, 1994 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The early battle lines were drawn Monday over the state Public Utilities Commission's proposal to lower California's electricity rates through broad-scale deregulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2002 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
An energy industry whistle-blower told state senators Monday that natural gas traders across the nation commonly lied about their transactions to drive market prices and boost profits. The testimony portrayed a rotten underpinning to the energy industry, with widespread manipulation of even the prices published in newsletters that traders and regulators use to determine long-term contract prices and the rates charged to consumers.
BUSINESS
September 14, 2000 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Potatoes, onions and other basic commodities hardly seem like risky items for supermarkets to stock. However, growers say they are increasingly being charged tens of thousands of dollars in upfront fees usually reserved for food manufacturers introducing unfamiliar products such as a new flavor of ketchup or variety of potato chip. Growers, regulators and others will gather today in a U.S.
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