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Legislators And Governor

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OPINION
April 1, 2005
Re "Government by Sledgehammer," editorial, March 27: As a fairly recent resident of California, I am amazed by the number of ballot initiatives. As I spent hours studying them before the last election, I began to wonder why we bothered to elect officials to represent us in Sacramento. I too would like to see our legislators and governor do the hard work they were elected to do -- talk and work together until they can come up with legislation that we can all live with. They need to set aside egos and stop the grandstanding.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2009 | Evan Halper
Well-connected lobbyists, political pressure and a good turnout at committee hearings used to be the special interest recipe for protecting turf in the state budget. Now, a potent new ingredient is being increasingly thrown into the mix: top-shelf litigators. Lawyers are being drafted in droves to unravel spending plans passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor. The goal of these litigators is to get back money their clients lost in the budget process. They are having considerable success, winning one lawsuit after another, costing the state billions of dollars and throwing California's budget process into further tumult.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990
On Page 3 in the Nov. 16 Times, the headline reads: "$1-Billion Austerity Plan Urged as State Revenues Dive." On the same page in the lower right corner, another, smaller "headline" reads: "Raise for Legislators, Governor Endorsed by Salary Commission." Is there something wrong with this picture? Do I read this right? My income will no doubt be affected by the "austerity" plan, and the legislators and governor who helped get California into this fiscal mess will get a raise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
Earlier this year, when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger hunkered down with legislators in budget negotiations, the result was a delay of regulations to crack down on cancer-causing diesel pollution from construction and farm equipment. It was a provision intensely sought by business interests, but one with little effect on budgetary or fiscal matters.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990
I see our legislators and governor are getting a substantial raise. In the meantime, this same state is depriving the disabled and the aged poor of their annual cost-of-living raise. The raise that state legislators will get is about $12,000 more per year. That is twice the entire yearly earnings of the aged poor and disabled. What this state and this country need is revolution. Millionaire politicians vote themselves raises while people struggling at the very bottom of the social order are squeezed.
OPINION
May 19, 2003
Re "Davis Urges Electricity Rate Cut," May 14: Gov. Gray Davis claims to "provide relief to ratepayers and help California's economy" with his energy plan, which "would save an average of $30 a year." Wow, a whopping 30 bucks! This is a joke! Consider "New Davis Budget Seeks to Cut Less, Borrow More" (May 14), which details the tax-and-spend strategy of Democrats. The increased auto tax will cost the average driver about $130 a year, and a half-cent increase in the state sales tax will likely cost an individual several hundred dollars annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
Labor Day means picnics in parks. State budget deficits mean continued deterioration of state parks. And that's where Californians are this holiday. A million people are expected to pack California's 279 state parks this weekend. And 121 people -- the legislators and governor -- still are trying to fill yet another budget hole that gobbles up money that should be going to parks. Leafing through a lengthy legislative budget proposal, I was stunned to read: "State parks have an approximate deferred maintenance need of $1.2 billion."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2009 | Evan Halper
Well-connected lobbyists, political pressure and a good turnout at committee hearings used to be the special interest recipe for protecting turf in the state budget. Now, a potent new ingredient is being increasingly thrown into the mix: top-shelf litigators. Lawyers are being drafted in droves to unravel spending plans passed by the Legislature and signed by the governor. The goal of these litigators is to get back money their clients lost in the budget process. They are having considerable success, winning one lawsuit after another, costing the state billions of dollars and throwing California's budget process into further tumult.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 2009 | Margot Roosevelt
Earlier this year, when Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger hunkered down with legislators in budget negotiations, the result was a delay of regulations to crack down on cancer-causing diesel pollution from construction and farm equipment. It was a provision intensely sought by business interests, but one with little effect on budgetary or fiscal matters.
NEWS
March 1, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Legislators and the governor, hamstrung by voter initiatives, play a shell game with California's budget to cloak deficits and questionable borrowing, a blue-ribbon commission concluded Tuesday. The 23-member California Citizens Budget Commission offered 31 recommendations to speed up budget deliberations, assure public scrutiny and limit what it called needless gridlock in the Capitol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 2008 | GEORGE SKELTON
Labor Day means picnics in parks. State budget deficits mean continued deterioration of state parks. And that's where Californians are this holiday. A million people are expected to pack California's 279 state parks this weekend. And 121 people -- the legislators and governor -- still are trying to fill yet another budget hole that gobbles up money that should be going to parks. Leafing through a lengthy legislative budget proposal, I was stunned to read: "State parks have an approximate deferred maintenance need of $1.2 billion."
OPINION
April 1, 2005
Re "Government by Sledgehammer," editorial, March 27: As a fairly recent resident of California, I am amazed by the number of ballot initiatives. As I spent hours studying them before the last election, I began to wonder why we bothered to elect officials to represent us in Sacramento. I too would like to see our legislators and governor do the hard work they were elected to do -- talk and work together until they can come up with legislation that we can all live with. They need to set aside egos and stop the grandstanding.
OPINION
May 19, 2003
Re "Davis Urges Electricity Rate Cut," May 14: Gov. Gray Davis claims to "provide relief to ratepayers and help California's economy" with his energy plan, which "would save an average of $30 a year." Wow, a whopping 30 bucks! This is a joke! Consider "New Davis Budget Seeks to Cut Less, Borrow More" (May 14), which details the tax-and-spend strategy of Democrats. The increased auto tax will cost the average driver about $130 a year, and a half-cent increase in the state sales tax will likely cost an individual several hundred dollars annually.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 27, 1990
I see our legislators and governor are getting a substantial raise. In the meantime, this same state is depriving the disabled and the aged poor of their annual cost-of-living raise. The raise that state legislators will get is about $12,000 more per year. That is twice the entire yearly earnings of the aged poor and disabled. What this state and this country need is revolution. Millionaire politicians vote themselves raises while people struggling at the very bottom of the social order are squeezed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1990
On Page 3 in the Nov. 16 Times, the headline reads: "$1-Billion Austerity Plan Urged as State Revenues Dive." On the same page in the lower right corner, another, smaller "headline" reads: "Raise for Legislators, Governor Endorsed by Salary Commission." Is there something wrong with this picture? Do I read this right? My income will no doubt be affected by the "austerity" plan, and the legislators and governor who helped get California into this fiscal mess will get a raise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1998
State legislators and the governor are fighting over possible reductions to the auto license fees or income tax. However, because these taxes are deductible for federal income tax purposes, about 30% of a cut in either of these taxes will end up in the hands of the federal government. Let them instead cut our outrageous sales tax. Then, all of the tax savings will go to the people who live and spend money in California. We will benefit every time we buy anything subject to sales tax. Even a temporary reduction in our 8.25% tax would be welcome, and we should let politicians know it. NORMAN H. GREEN Glendale
OPINION
November 4, 2009
Re "Love those 'crazy' term limits," Opinion, Oct. 31 "Experience is overrated." Is Philip Blumel kidding? Our legislators' -- and this governor's -- lack of experience is what has put us in this awful budget situation. Like many novice politicians who come into office, they learn very quickly that legislating and governing require more than intent and ideas. Those tasks require skills to negotiate, relationships built on trust over the years and knowledge of the legislative process.
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