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August 6, 1995 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Congressman Gary A. Franks remembers taking a road trip through Ithaca, N.Y., with the Yale basket ball team. He and teammate Leroy Watkins stopped at a diner there, found seats and waited. Four white players walked in and were served. But it wasn't until Franks upended a salt shaker, spilling its contents on the floor, that the waitress rushed over. Franks--then a bushy-haired, bushy-bearded sociology student and starting guard--told her, "Now, we're ready to place our order."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill meant to keep police officers from unfairly stopping minority drivers has set off its own racially charged quarrel among some of Los Angeles' most prominent civil rights activists--with the bill's African American sponsor accusing his opponents of being led by white outsiders. The measure by state Sen.
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NEWS
January 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
U.S. Rep. Louis Stokes, who rose from poverty to become the state's first black representative and went on to head the congressional panel that investigated the assassination of President Kennedy, announced Saturday he will retire at the end of the year. "It is probably the most difficult decision I have had to make in the last 30 years," Stokes told a room packed with supporters.
NEWS
January 18, 1998 | From Associated Press
U.S. Rep. Louis Stokes, who rose from poverty to become the state's first black representative and went on to head the congressional panel that investigated the assassination of President Kennedy, announced Saturday he will retire at the end of the year. "It is probably the most difficult decision I have had to make in the last 30 years," Stokes told a room packed with supporters.
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they come to grips with the changed congressional landscape, organizations representing African Americans are groping for a new strategy to advance their interests. Some--like Wade Henderson, Washington director of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People--have begun planning the unimaginable: He is seeking issues where the civil rights group can form coalitions with GOP leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 2000 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A bill meant to keep police officers from unfairly stopping minority drivers has set off its own racially charged quarrel among some of Los Angeles' most prominent civil rights activists--with the bill's African American sponsor accusing his opponents of being led by white outsiders. The measure by state Sen.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Congressman Gary A. Franks remembers taking a road trip through Ithaca, N.Y., with the Yale basket ball team. He and teammate Leroy Watkins stopped at a diner there, found seats and waited. Four white players walked in and were served. But it wasn't until Franks upended a salt shaker, spilling its contents on the floor, that the waitress rushed over. Franks--then a bushy-haired, bushy-bearded sociology student and starting guard--told her, "Now, we're ready to place our order."
NEWS
November 11, 1994 | SAM FULWOOD III, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As they come to grips with the changed congressional landscape, organizations representing African Americans are groping for a new strategy to advance their interests. Some--like Wade Henderson, Washington director of the National Assn. for the Advancement of Colored People--have begun planning the unimaginable: He is seeking issues where the civil rights group can form coalitions with GOP leaders.
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