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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1998 | DARRELL SATZMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a strong expression of support for building the next generation of military jets at Palmdale's Plant 42, California's entire congressional delegation has signed a letter asking the Department of Defense to compare production costs there with costs at any other facility. The contract to build the Joint Strike Fighter could be worth up to $750 billion over 25 years and is expected to generate thousands of new jobs in the region where it is built. The Oct.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 30, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - A group of Republican state lawmakers Wednesday proposed allowing school districts to spend education funds to train teachers, administrators and janitors in gun use. Responding to last month's mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., the lawmakers said arming school personnel would help protect campuses against violent intruders. "The idea is to create essentially an invisible line of defense around our kids," said Assemblyman and tea party adherent Tim Donnelly of San Bernardino.
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NEWS
February 6, 1994 | MARK ARAX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Jim Costa was one of the bright, young lights on the Democratic scene when one summer night in 1986 he was charged with soliciting a Sacramento prostitute and a police decoy posing as a prostitute for a three-way sex act. The timing of his arrest--in the midst of a reelection campaign--could have hardly been worse, and a chastened Costa returned home to Fresno and apologized to a roomful of supporters that included his mother and political mentors.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2012 | By Marc Lifsher, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - With just three days left in this year's legislative session, state lawmakers got a dose of the strong emotions swirling through the Capitol for and against a plan to overhaul California's century-old workers' compensation insurance program. The bill formally introduced Friday seeks to increase benefits for injured workers while cutting medical and legal costs to avoid an estimated 12.6% hike in premiums facing employers in January. At issue is a 170-page bill to revise the $17-billion system to protect injured workers that is only now beginning a fast and furious trip through the Legislature.
NEWS
April 13, 1996 | CARL INGRAM and HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Republican state lawmaker associated with militias and other fringe organizations stirred new controversy Friday with the disclosure that four years ago he refused to pay federal income taxes because of what he called his "white man's citizenship." State Sen. Don Rogers of Tehachapi made the assertion during a fight with the Internal Revenue Service over back taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 1996 | JOHN GLIONNA / Times Staff Writer
Call it the story of Mr. Cardenas goes to the state Capitol. Tony Cardenas, the 33-year-old political newcomer from Mission Hills, who on Monday was officially sworn in as the first Latino state legislator from the San Fernando Valley, spent Sunday afternoon trying his new digs out for size.
NEWS
May 11, 1999 | ANTONIO OLIVO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Gilbert Cedillo seems to be the last person who would budge in his opposition to Proposition 187. Before the Los Angeles Democrat became a legislator, he helped orchestrate a 1994 march that drew 150,000 protesters against the initiative to restrict education and health care for illegal immigrants. After voters approved Proposition 187, Cedillo joined a legal challenge that resulted in a federal judge ruling most of the measure unconstitutional.
NEWS
March 4, 1995 | MARTIN MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After playing to packed houses in Sacramento on three previous occasions, a special Senate committee probing the Orange County bankruptcy drew only a modest crowd Friday to Irvine City Hall as lawmakers met in one of the cities hardest hit by the financial crisis. Attorneys, financial experts and legislative aides, who sat scribbling notes onto yellow legal pads, made up most of the 100 attending the daylong hearing. Conspicuously absent, however, were community activists and ordinary citizens.
NEWS
December 23, 1991 | CARL INGRAM
As dank and cheerless as a dose of Central Valley tule fog, a numbing malaise has settled over the once high-flying California Legislature. Rarely, if ever, has the Legislature found itself under such heavy siege, much of it arguably self-induced: * Livelihoods and careers are endangered by voter-approved term limits and court-proposed reapportionment plans. * Three former state senators have been found guilty of political corruption. Still more may fall.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1993 | GLENN F. BUNTING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seizing a final opportunity to plead for thousands of jobs jeopardized by proposals to close military bases, a California congressional delegation urged an independent panel on Monday to spare the already hard-hit state from further economic hardship. A parade of 17 elected California officials told the Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission that the state has suffered a disproportionate share of job losses from two earlier rounds of defense cutbacks.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2012 | By Chad Terhune, Los Angeles Times
As doubts grow about the survival of the federal healthcare law, state officials are considering ways to keep key elements of the legislation alive in California. Skepticism of the Affordable Care Act by conservative Supreme Court justices during oral arguments last week has raised the possibility the court will strike the individual mandate to purchase health coverage or throw out the entire law as unconstitutional. Even if the whole law is scrapped nationally, many of its consumer protections, such as guaranteed coverage for children, are expected to survive in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
Investors may not be willing to back the state's bullet train project until after it begins operating, the California High-Speed Rail Authority said in a letter to key legislators, an acknowledgment that again raises serious questions about how the $43-billion construction cost will be paid over the next decade. The letter gives a preview of the authority's upcoming business plan, a critical document that is supposed to address long-standing concerns that it lacks a credible blueprint for building and operating the system.
NATIONAL
May 24, 2009 | Mike Dorning
President Obama predicted travails ahead for the struggle to pass healthcare reform but offered a hopeful outlook for passage of legislation providing access to insurance coverage for all, saying that "the stars may be aligned" for a deal on a goal that eluded the last Democratic president. In a C-SPAN interview that aired Saturday, Obama said he was "absolutely committed" to moving forward with a healthcare plan and promised he would announce his Supreme Court nomination soon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2001 | STEPHEN BRAUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Stung by new reports linking him to a missing Modesto woman, Rep. Gary A. Condit (D-Ceres) insisted through aides Thursday that Chandra Ann Levy had not stayed overnight in his Washington apartment. Condit's aides denied a report that he had told District of Columbia police detectives about visits by Levy--an account that took both her parents and Modesto investigators by surprise.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 2001 | From the Washington Post
U.S. Rep. Gary Condit told Washington police that Chandra Levy has spent the night at his Adams Morgan apartment, according to law enforcement sources, who also said the missing intern told a close relative that she was romantically involved with the congressman. The California Democrat has said he is simply a good friend of Levy, and his office has denied a romance between the two.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2001 | RICHARD WINTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
She's a student of the antiwar movement who, years later, reached out to developers to bring a shopping center to her hometown. She's an educator who, when Latinos and Asians began to clash at a local high school, helped start conflict-resolution classes. She's a politician who battled against a backlash against Asian Americans in Monterey Park during the 1980s and later won over some of her biggest foes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 1992 | SAM ENRIQUEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five Los Angeles lawmakers returned campaign contributions totaling $6,000 to Assemblyman Tom Bane (D-Tarzana) because the money was unsolicited and they questioned whether Bane was allowed to spend his nearly $500,000 war chest after deciding not to seek reelection.
NEWS
December 27, 1991 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight California lawmakers were cited Thursday as having among the poorest attendance records in Congress in 1991, with Rep. Mel Levine (D-Santa Monica) taking part in only 60% of roll-call votes in the House. Levine's total gave him the second-lowest voting percentage of the 435 House members this year, according to an annual study released by the private Roll Call Report Syndicate group. Also listed as frequently absent was Rep. Barbara Boxer (D-Greenbrae), who failed to vote 20% of the time.
NEWS
January 4, 2001 | GEORGE SKELTON
"I'm doing fine," Alan Cranston told me four days before he died. He didn't sound fine. He sounded weak. Slightly hoarse. Like he was fighting a cold. Or had just woken from a nap. Whatever, I didn't pursue it. I had called the former senator to ask whether he'd like to be quoted in the paper's obituary about retired Times political writer Richard Bergholz, a Cranston contemporary who died the day after Christmas. I left a message and he called back within an hour.
NEWS
December 29, 2000 | ROBERT A. ROSENBLATT and NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
California will pick up only one new seat in the U.S. House of Representatives--its smallest gain in 80 years--as a result of the population numbers released by the Census Bureau on Thursday. Four states--Texas, Florida, Georgia and Arizona--will gain two House seats each. The biggest losers are New York and Pennsylvania, each giving up two seats. Nationally, the U.S. population reached 281,421,906 on census day last April 1, a gain of 13.2%.
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