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NEWS
April 8, 1992 | The Washington Post
Sen. Timothy E. Wirth (D-Colo.) said Tuesday he has decided not to run for a second term this fall. He cited the same sense of frustration and futility that is driving an increasing number of lawmakers from Congress. Wirth's announcement stunned colleagues on Capitol Hill, who have seen almost daily surprise retirements in recent weeks, so far totaling 45 House members and seven senators. The post-World War II record was set in 1978, when 49 House members and 10 senators stepped down.
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NATIONAL
May 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Gov. Bill Owens vetoed a bill Friday that would have outlawed workplace discrimination against gays. But he allowed a measure to take effect extending protection to gays under Colorado's hate crimes law. The workplace discrimination bill would have prohibited an employer from firing, demoting or harassing an employee based on sexual orientation. Owens said he considered the measure unnecessary and said it could have forced employers into costly lawsuits.
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NEWS
November 30, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move that surprised the political world and saddened her supporters, especially feminist leaders, veteran Democratic Rep. Patricia Schroeder of Colorado announced Wednesday that she would not seek reelection next year. Schroeder, whose 23 years in office made her the dean of the 55 women serving in the House or Senate, represents a heavily Democratic district that includes all of Denver.
NEWS
November 30, 1995 | ELIZABETH MEHREN and LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In a move that surprised the political world and saddened her supporters, especially feminist leaders, veteran Democratic Rep. Patricia Schroeder of Colorado announced Wednesday that she would not seek reelection next year. Schroeder, whose 23 years in office made her the dean of the 55 women serving in the House or Senate, represents a heavily Democratic district that includes all of Denver.
NATIONAL
May 28, 2005 | From Associated Press
Gov. Bill Owens vetoed a bill Friday that would have outlawed workplace discrimination against gays. But he allowed a measure to take effect extending protection to gays under Colorado's hate crimes law. The workplace discrimination bill would have prohibited an employer from firing, demoting or harassing an employee based on sexual orientation. Owens said he considered the measure unnecessary and said it could have forced employers into costly lawsuits.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A far-reaching anti-gay ballot initiative in Oregon that attracted nationwide attention appeared headed for defeat Tuesday, while a milder Colorado measure barring the adoption of gay-rights legislation in that state was winning with most of the vote counted. The measures have been closely watched as flash points in the battle over gay rights, with both sides predicting that passage of either initiative would prompt similar efforts elsewhere.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Maeve Reston
GOLDEN, Colo. - To win the battleground state of Colorado in November, Mitt Romney has one very tall task - winning over Latinos and independent voters after running a staunchly conservative campaign that alienated many of them during the Republican primary. At the most elaborately staged rally of his campaign, the former Massachusetts Governor sought to do just that Monday night - speaking before a crowd of thousands in an illuminated amphitheater here, with New Mexico Gov. Susana Martinez at his side and a diverse group behind him, a few holding signs that said "Democrats for Romney.
NEWS
September 30, 1990 | GEORGE SKELTON, TIMES SACRAMENTO BUREAU CHIEF
The California electorate is in a mood to join Oklahoma in imposing term limits on state legislators in a broad-based revolt against failures in Sacramento, The Los Angeles Times Poll has found. Voters are angry at the Legislature as an institution rather than its individual members, the survey indicated. When it comes to the lawmakers in the citizens' districts, there seems to be no great fervor to "throw the rascals out."
NATIONAL
September 11, 2013 | By Mark Z. Barabak
COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. - For a time after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School, it seemed as if the politics of gun control might shift dramatically in favor of tougher restrictions. But less than a year after December's shooting deaths in Newtown, Conn., it appears that outside a few Democratic-leaning states, expansive gun control is no more politically tenable now than it was before the 26 students and staff members died. The recall Tuesday of two Colorado senators, targeted because they voted to strengthen the state's gun restrictions, was just the latest setback for those seeking to reduce gun violence by making firearms less available.
NEWS
August 31, 2008 | Nate Jenkins and Kelley Gillenwater, Associated Press
Simple numbers were working against the fire and rescue department in this town of 400 along Interstate 80. Unbeknownst to six people in a Chevrolet Suburban that had just wrecked on the busy interstate, the math didn't favor them either. "We only had enough people to run one ambulance," said Adam Hayward, an emergency medical technician with Big Springs Fire & Rescue. "We have two, but a lot of times we don't have enough people to run them." The fire chief called for help from a volunteer department in nearby Julesburg, Colo.
NEWS
November 4, 1992 | BETTINA BOXALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A far-reaching anti-gay ballot initiative in Oregon that attracted nationwide attention appeared headed for defeat Tuesday, while a milder Colorado measure barring the adoption of gay-rights legislation in that state was winning with most of the vote counted. The measures have been closely watched as flash points in the battle over gay rights, with both sides predicting that passage of either initiative would prompt similar efforts elsewhere.
NEWS
April 8, 1992 | The Washington Post
Sen. Timothy E. Wirth (D-Colo.) said Tuesday he has decided not to run for a second term this fall. He cited the same sense of frustration and futility that is driving an increasing number of lawmakers from Congress. Wirth's announcement stunned colleagues on Capitol Hill, who have seen almost daily surprise retirements in recent weeks, so far totaling 45 House members and seven senators. The post-World War II record was set in 1978, when 49 House members and 10 senators stepped down.
NEWS
October 14, 1990 | JERRY GILLAM and CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Resentment toward the Legislature, fed by the continuing investigation of political corruption at the state Capitol, is casting a shadow over the reelection chances of incumbents. "The anti-incumbent feeling is pretty strong out there," said veteran Democratic campaign strategist David Townsend. "The polling shows the public sentiment toward throwing the rascals out probably is greater than I have ever seen it."
TRAVEL
October 2, 1994 | Christopher Reynolds, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
It's a symphony night. The lights of the downtown skyline twinkle, the snow-blanketed Rockies stagger in the distance and subterranean metallic groans rise from the innards of the U.S. Mint in the heart of downtown. I sit a few blocks away in Boettcher Concert Hall, surrounded by the modern geometry of the Denver Performing Arts Complex, waiting.
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