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NEWS
December 30, 1993 | ALAN C. MILLER
California legislators often complain of bias against their state in Congress. They say this stems from the sheer size and clout of the 54-member delegation--the largest ever. It may reflect envy or self-interest. In any case, it's called ABC: Anyone But California. So it was that Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) was singing the California economic blues when she was asked how to persuade colleagues that the no-longer-so-Golden State warrants special assistance from the federal government.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 2001 | JULIE TAMAKI and DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Acknowledging Thursday that he will propose budget cuts next week when he releases his revised spending plan, Gov. Gray Davis blamed Republicans for the reductions in proposed government services. In an especially partisan attack, the Democratic governor lashed out at Republican legislators for refusing to support legislation authorizing the state to sell as much as $13.4 billion in bonds to pay for power purchases.
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NEWS
February 7, 1990 | DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The felony conviction of Sen. Joseph B. Montoya makes it clearer than ever that state lawmakers should not be collecting outside income or speaking fees and that the taxpayers, not special interests, should be financing campaigns, state Controller Gray Davis said Tuesday. "There ought to be public financing for every campaign," Davis said in a breakfast interview with The Times' Sacramento bureau. "It works for the President. There is no reason it can't work for other offices."
NEWS
December 30, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Maverick Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), who endured 5 1/2 years of torture as a prisoner of war in Vietnam and hobbled home a hero, today will disclose his intention to seek the Republican nomination for president in 2000, aides said Tuesday. In keeping with his image as a politician who often defies convention, the former Navy bomber pilot will not deliver the obligatory grand political announcement.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | CARL INGRAM and JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The tally now stands at three state senators either convicted of or admitting to political corruption charges and the FBI search for more culprits in California government continues. Yet the question persists: Why hasn't the Legislature, its reputation continually sinking as more wrongdoing in its ranks is exposed, acted more forcefully to clean up its act and restore public confidence?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before he resigned in disgrace this week, former state Sen. Alan Robbins was known as a prodigious campaign fund-raiser, stockpiling hundreds of thousands of dollars as a hedge against political challengers.
NEWS
October 8, 1991 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So I'm sitting around worrying about really serious problems--like I don't have a thing to wear for nuclear winter--and I keep getting distracted, derailed, in fact, because everybody here is so obsessed with some petty scandal in the House of Representatives. What, again? Why is everybody so upset? So the bank at the House honored 8,331 bad checks without charging penalties?
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 59 senators pocketed appearance fees from special interest groups during 1991, the last year they were permitted to accept honorariums, according to financial disclosure documents made public Friday. While the amount of honorariums accepted by senators declined sharply over previous years, there appeared to be little--if any--drop-off in the number of junkets that senators took at the expense of special interest groups. Sen. Frank H.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A divided House Ethics Committee on Thursday proposed disclosing the names of 19 members of Congress and five former members who it said were the worst offenders in writing bad checks on their accounts at the now-closed House bank. Dissenters on the panel, however, immediately branded the plan a "whitewash" and said that they would recommend disclosure of all the names of House members who overdrew their accounts.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislators collected a record $33.4 million in campaign contributions for a non-election year in 1993, with freshman Assembly members collecting just as much as their veteran colleagues. "The 1993 campaign contribution harvest was indeed a bountiful one for state legislators," said Ruth Holton, executive director of Common Cause, the grass-roots political group that on Wednesday issued a report on last year's campaign donations. The $33.4 million raised in 1993 was almost double the $19.
NEWS
December 12, 1995 | LOUIS SAHAGUN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an emotional "tell-all" appearance that lasted more than 4 1/2 hours, Rep. Enid Greene Waldholtz (R-Utah) on Monday said that blind love made her the innocent dupe of a husband who defrauded her family and possibly financed her 1994 campaign with tainted money. Speaking publicly about the scandal for the first time, Waldholtz also apologized, saying that she had been tricked by her estranged husband into filing false campaign reports and income tax returns.
BUSINESS
June 9, 1995 | From Associated Press
Extensive negotiations to permit banks to affiliate with insurance companies collapsed Thursday, the chairman of the House Commerce Committee said, casting uncertainty over a major bank reform bill. Rep. Thomas J. Bliley Jr. (R-Va.) had spearheaded talks in recent days to resolve the central dispute in the bill moving through the House: whether banks should be able to expand further into the insurance field.
NEWS
May 27, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Finance Committee passed legislation Friday that would end the six-decade federal guarantee of support to every destitute American woman with children by transferring vast authority over the welfare system to states. Only one Democrat, Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.), joined Republicans in the 12-8 vote, which sets the stage for a floor debate next month on what is likely to be one of the most important decisions of the current Congress.
NEWS
April 28, 1994 | JERRY GILLAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State legislators collected a record $33.4 million in campaign contributions for a non-election year in 1993, with freshman Assembly members collecting just as much as their veteran colleagues. "The 1993 campaign contribution harvest was indeed a bountiful one for state legislators," said Ruth Holton, executive director of Common Cause, the grass-roots political group that on Wednesday issued a report on last year's campaign donations. The $33.4 million raised in 1993 was almost double the $19.
NEWS
December 30, 1993 | ALAN C. MILLER
California legislators often complain of bias against their state in Congress. They say this stems from the sheer size and clout of the 54-member delegation--the largest ever. It may reflect envy or self-interest. In any case, it's called ABC: Anyone But California. So it was that Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) was singing the California economic blues when she was asked how to persuade colleagues that the no-longer-so-Golden State warrants special assistance from the federal government.
NEWS
June 13, 1992 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At least 59 senators pocketed appearance fees from special interest groups during 1991, the last year they were permitted to accept honorariums, according to financial disclosure documents made public Friday. While the amount of honorariums accepted by senators declined sharply over previous years, there appeared to be little--if any--drop-off in the number of junkets that senators took at the expense of special interest groups. Sen. Frank H.
NEWS
July 4, 1990 | SARA FRITZ and DWIGHT MORRIS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The defense and financial services industries, both of which have big stakes in pending legislative battles, paid House and Senate members more than $2.5 million in appearance fees last year--accounting for more than a quarter of all congressional honorariums. A Times computer-assisted study of 1989 financial disclosure reports found that members of Congress received more than $1.4 million in speaking fees from the defense industry and $1.1 million from banking and financial interests.
NEWS
January 16, 1989 | SARA FRITZ, Times Staff Writer
A bust of Rep. Dan Rostenkowski (D-Ill.) stands in the Polish Museum of America, an enduring monument to the veteran congressman's generosity to the museum and many other ethnic charities in his hometown, Chicago. Rostenkowski, chairman of the House Ways and Means Committee, enjoys being known as a generous man in his home district. He enjoys it so much, in fact, that he gave away nearly $219,000 in 1987, most of it to local charities. He is by no means a rich man, however.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A divided House Ethics Committee on Thursday proposed disclosing the names of 19 members of Congress and five former members who it said were the worst offenders in writing bad checks on their accounts at the now-closed House bank. Dissenters on the panel, however, immediately branded the plan a "whitewash" and said that they would recommend disclosure of all the names of House members who overdrew their accounts.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1991 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Before he resigned in disgrace this week, former state Sen. Alan Robbins was known as a prodigious campaign fund-raiser, stockpiling hundreds of thousands of dollars as a hedge against political challengers.
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