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NEWS
January 11, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man blamed for--or credited with--forcing Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama to abruptly resign last week has spent far more time as a mathematics professor in America than as a politician in Japan. Socialist congressman Tadatori Akiba cites an American Revolution maxim, refers to Euclidean geometry and compares Japanese bureaucrats to Windows 95--impenetrable icons shielding the essential structure--in political speeches delivered in flawless English.
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NEWS
January 29, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimiko tells her story with calm detachment. How her husband beat her dozens of times during their 32 years together, raining blows down on her face, thighs and stomach, pounding her back with wooden boards, kicking her hard enough to break a rib. When he wasn't abusing her body, he tortured her spirit, making her feel ugly, awkward and worthless and forcing her to attend to his every whim.
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BUSINESS
November 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Lawmakers to Protest Opening Rice Market: Nearly 40 of the opposition lawmakers are planning a two-day hunger strike set to begin today to protest a reported agreement between Tokyo and Washington to ease Japan's longstanding ban on imported rice. The legislators, all from the Liberal Democratic Party, have called the strike because of media reports that Japan has agreed to allow up to 8% of its rice to be imported, said Satoko Niimi, a secretary to one of the lawmakers.
NEWS
January 11, 1996 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The man blamed for--or credited with--forcing Japanese Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama to abruptly resign last week has spent far more time as a mathematics professor in America than as a politician in Japan. Socialist congressman Tadatori Akiba cites an American Revolution maxim, refers to Euclidean geometry and compares Japanese bureaucrats to Windows 95--impenetrable icons shielding the essential structure--in political speeches delivered in flawless English.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Turmoil erupted in Parliament on Monday over the government's handling of Japan's killer earthquake as the death toll surpassed 5,000, unofficial damage estimates rose to $100 billion and the stock market suffered its biggest drop in 3 1/2 years. "Bungling" in the government's handling of the disaster "showed that under the Cabinet of Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama, even the most minimum responsibility of the government . . . to protect the lives and property of the people . . .
NEWS
January 29, 2002 | MARK MAGNIER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Kimiko tells her story with calm detachment. How her husband beat her dozens of times during their 32 years together, raining blows down on her face, thighs and stomach, pounding her back with wooden boards, kicking her hard enough to break a rib. When he wasn't abusing her body, he tortured her spirit, making her feel ugly, awkward and worthless and forcing her to attend to his every whim.
NEWS
July 6, 1987 | Associated Press
Yasuhiro Nakasone delivered what is likely to be his final parliamentary address as prime minister today, telling legislators that Japan's economy must be restructured if it is to develop in harmony with the world's. In a 30-minute speech to an added session of the Diet, Japan's Parliament, Nakasone reviewed the aims of his five-year administration, laying emphasis on economic and tax system reforms and Japan's growing international role.
NEWS
January 24, 1995 | SAM JAMESON and DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Turmoil erupted in Parliament on Monday over the government's handling of Japan's killer earthquake as the death toll surpassed 5,000, unofficial damage estimates rose to $100 billion and the stock market suffered its biggest drop in 3 1/2 years. "Bungling" in the government's handling of the disaster "showed that under the Cabinet of Prime Minister Tomiichi Murayama, even the most minimum responsibility of the government . . . to protect the lives and property of the people . . .
BUSINESS
November 30, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Japan Lawmakers to Protest Opening Rice Market: Nearly 40 of the opposition lawmakers are planning a two-day hunger strike set to begin today to protest a reported agreement between Tokyo and Washington to ease Japan's longstanding ban on imported rice. The legislators, all from the Liberal Democratic Party, have called the strike because of media reports that Japan has agreed to allow up to 8% of its rice to be imported, said Satoko Niimi, a secretary to one of the lawmakers.
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