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NEWS
November 6, 1997 | Reuters
In an unprecedented show of strength, Mexican lawmakers on Wednesday rejected a routine request from President Ernesto Zedillo to attend a summit in Canada. The opposition majority in the lower house of Congress, the Chamber of Deputies, told Zedillo he had failed to provide sufficient justification to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vancouver, Canada, on Nov. 22-25 and asked him to resubmit the request with more information.
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NEWS
November 6, 1997 | Reuters
In an unprecedented show of strength, Mexican lawmakers on Wednesday rejected a routine request from President Ernesto Zedillo to attend a summit in Canada. The opposition majority in the lower house of Congress, the Chamber of Deputies, told Zedillo he had failed to provide sufficient justification to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vancouver, Canada, on Nov. 22-25 and asked him to resubmit the request with more information.
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NEWS
November 28, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lone voice of dissent in Mexico's long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, resigned Wednesday, asserting that "the fascist interests that dominate" the party are blocking true democratic reform. "They are moving in the opposite direction," Alejandro Rojas Diaz-Duran declared in a resignation speech at the Chamber of Deputies that was a scathing attack on the PRI and its recent attempts at internal reform.
NEWS
November 28, 1996 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A lone voice of dissent in Mexico's long-ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI, resigned Wednesday, asserting that "the fascist interests that dominate" the party are blocking true democratic reform. "They are moving in the opposite direction," Alejandro Rojas Diaz-Duran declared in a resignation speech at the Chamber of Deputies that was a scathing attack on the PRI and its recent attempts at internal reform.
NEWS
January 3, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Legislators in Mexico's Tabasco state found themselves with two interim governors--and no agreement about which one should stay. Opposition lawmakers appointed a second interim governor after rejecting the candidate appointed Sunday by the outgoing legislature dominated by the Institutional Revolutionary Party, or PRI. The PRI candidate, interim Gov. Enrique Priego, was also sworn in Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2008 | Nancy Vogel
In his first visit to California as president of Mexico, Felipe Calderon told the Legislature on Wednesday that immigration "carries off the best among us," and he vowed to create the economic conditions that would allow Mexicans to find well-paid work in their own country. Calderon drew applause, particularly from Republican legislators, when he said, "While my government is committed to protecting the rights of all Mexicans, including those living beyond our borders, we are taking great efforts to ensure that in the future no Mexican needs to leave our country to find job opportunities elsewhere."
OPINION
May 14, 2007
A SAYING ATTRIBUTED to St. Augustine translates from the Latin as "Rome has spoken; the matter is settled." Fortunately for some Catholic politicians in the United States, that isn't always the case. On Wednesday, as he was flying to Brazil, Pope Benedict XVI answered "yes" when asked if he agreed with the excommunication of Catholic legislators in Mexico who had voted to legalize abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2002 | JENNIFER MENA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When President Vicente Fox meets a group of U.S. residents in Mexico this week, Orange County restaurateur Carlos Olamendi will be among them, lobbying for immigrants' rights. The Republican from Laguna Niguel wants immigrants like himself to have the right to vote in Mexican elections and to be able to cross the border freely. But he opposes government assistance, such as welfare or housing subsidies, to immigrants and others. Instead of invoking the name of former Gov.
NEWS
August 18, 1992 | JESUS SANCHEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a plush ballroom at a downtown Los Angeles hotel, members of the Latino business elite assembled before the glare of television lights and cameras last week in an impressive show of support for the recently signed U.S.-Mexico-Canada free trade agreement. "If we stand behind this . . .
NEWS
February 18, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN and JUANITA DARLING, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
President Ernesto Zedillo's government made it clear Friday that it has no intention of withdrawing its troops from the embattled southern state of Chiapas, rejecting a key rebel demand to restart peace talks and signaling a potentially prolonged military standoff with the Zapatista National Liberation Army.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was a rare moment of candor and open debate for the political party that has ruled Mexico with an authoritarian hand for nearly seven decades. The subject: expelling a former president--and his brother--from the party's ranks for the first time in more than half a century. "Indignation and embarrassment are the moral attitudes that unite us now in this ominous time of corruption and criminality!"
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