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Legislators Taiwan

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NEWS
December 17, 1991
In a key step toward a genuinely democratic system in the country, voters in Taiwan go to the polls Saturday to elect the legislators scheduled to make key decisions next year about constitutional reform. At stake are 225 directly elected seats in Taiwan's 405-seat National Assembly. The rest of the places will be filled by 80 incumbents and 100 members to be appointed proportionally among political parties.
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NEWS
December 17, 1991
In a key step toward a genuinely democratic system in the country, voters in Taiwan go to the polls Saturday to elect the legislators scheduled to make key decisions next year about constitutional reform. At stake are 225 directly elected seats in Taiwan's 405-seat National Assembly. The rest of the places will be filled by 80 incumbents and 100 members to be appointed proportionally among political parties.
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WORLD
November 28, 2003 | Tyler Marshall, Times Staff Writer
After a long, emotional debate that included scuffles between legislators, Taiwan's parliament passed a highly controversial law Thursday that gives the island's president limited powers to call a national referendum on independence. The new law, which declares that such a referendum may be used only as a defensive move in case of an imminent attack by mainland China, is far less than what President Chen Shui-bian had pushed for.
WORLD
October 4, 2013 | By Ralph Jennings
TAIPEI, Taiwan - When Taiwanese lawmakers exchanged blows in August, two of them rolled around on the floor, locked in some sort of amateur wrestling hold. Another one pulled up his sleeves to show off his biceps. A ruling party legislator cast an arc of water on an opposition rival who had commandeered the podium in the wood-paneled, arena-like assembly room with its doors tied shut. Gridlock in Congress shut down much of the U.S. government this week for the first time in 17 years, but legislators in Taiwan have been known to sometimes duke out their disputes.
NEWS
March 22, 2000 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The civil war between Communist and Nationalist Chinese was perhaps never more surreal than on this tiny island about a mile off China's southern coast. For nearly 20 years, the two sides stuck to an almost comical arrangement to alternate their artillery fire during the week. On Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, the Nationalists shelled the mainland from their holdout here on Kinmen. On Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, it was the Communists' turn to bombard Kinmen from the mainland.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A year ago, as the Clinton administration was trying to decide what weapon systems to sell to Taiwan, it suddenly found itself under intense pressure from one of the most powerful men on Capitol Hill. Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) wanted the White House to let Taiwan buy advanced Aegis radar systems mounted on Arleigh Burke destroyers. And he wanted two of those warships to be built at Litton-Ingalls' shipyards in his hometown of Pascagoula, Miss.
WORLD
December 17, 2004 | Mark Magnier, Times Staff Writer
China's leadership is 2-for-2 over the last six months at "winning" elections in which it isn't a candidate. In Taiwan, for the first time in years, voters didn't disappoint the mainland, delivering a defeat to pro-independence President Chen Shui-bian in legislative elections last week. Three months ago, voters in Hong Kong also delivered a setback to the pro-democracy camp.
WORLD
September 4, 2011 | By Barbara Demick, Los Angeles Times
Dictators toppled! London burning! United States broke! On second thought, scratch the exclamation points. Except maybe for the bit about London burning. So far, 2011 has been a challenging year for the Chinese media on the news front, not to mention the existential one, as they walk a fine line to satisfy both their political masters and an increasingly savvy public with growing access to honest news reporting on the Internet. Perhaps not since the collapse of the Berlin Wall in 1989 has there been as much international news so inherently threatening to the Chinese Communist Party.
NEWS
March 15, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When former President George Bush announced during his 1992 reelection campaign that he was permitting the sale of F-16 warplanes to Taiwan, he justified it as a way of enhancing Taiwan's security. The fact that the $6-billion deal kept General Dynamics factories running in Texas didn't hurt either. And the sale had a third, less obvious purpose: American officials and trade representatives hoped that the military deal would give U.S.
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