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NEWS
December 19, 1998 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the outcome hardly in doubt, about the only suspense during Friday's impeachment debate was whether the outnumbered House Democrats would walk out. Another possible protest scenario had all 206 Democrats circling the Capitol, hands linked. A third proposal had all the Democrats standing mute in the House chamber and simply letting Republicans do all the talking. "But too many people wanted to be heard," rued one House Democrat. In the end, they played by the rules.
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NEWS
December 19, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
True or false? Every factual claim made in the course of the impeachment debate is subject to factual review by members of the House Judiciary Committee. But that did not put a stop to the litany of charges and countercharges of questionable accuracy in Friday's debate. Some of the most contentious claims: Question. Is censure constitutional or not? Answer.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | GERALDINE BAUM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"The question of the day is which capital city sustained more damage Friday: Baghdad or Washington?" At least that was what Marshall Wittmann, the head of congressional relations at the conservative Heritage Foundation, wanted to know--not to diminish the human damage in Iraq but to emphasize the political savagery ravaging the American capital. "The rest of the country looks in disgust upon us," he said, nodding at one of five television sets tuned to impeachment at the influential think tank.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Andrea Kessler, the mental picture of impeachment hearings in the Capitol and bombs falling in Iraq was as hard to sort out as the scene before her: a giant Picasso sculpture looming over miniature Alpine lodges where vendors from Bavaria sold socks to American holiday shoppers. "I just can't believe it," the 23-year-old Chicagoan said with a shake of her head. "Because it's so unbelievable."
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | From Reuters
House Judiciary Committee Chairman Henry J. Hyde (R-Ill.) called Friday for an end to prying into the sex lives of politicians. Hyde, who chairs the committee that called for President Clinton's impeachment on allegations he lied to conceal a sexual affair, said the American public was not well served by exposing the private "sexual misadventures" of lawmakers. He commented a day after House Speaker-elect Bob Livingston (R-La.) admitted to extramarital affairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 17, 1998 | RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Outgoing Republican lawmaker Jay C. Kim, who closed his congressional offices a month before his term ends, resurfaced Wednesday to deny reports he abandoned his constituents and to add his voice to the impeachment debate roiling Washington. Kim made the remarks in an interview published Wednesday by the Ontario-based Inland Valley Daily Bulletin. It was the congressman's first public statement since the news last week that he had closed his offices in Yorba Linda, Ontario and Washington.
NEWS
December 8, 1998 | FAYE FIORE
They were just getting to the part about House ethics in the new members' orientation one Friday last month when the South Bay's new Republican congressman, Steve Kuykendall, had to duck out to attend to a matter of great urgency. He had to look at an apartment. It was a 1950s-bland studio in a building called Hill House, where about half the tenants are members of Congress and the manager is a guy named Buzz. It was $750 a month and Kuykendall took it on the spot.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days before they are likely to cast an epic vote on whether to impeach a president for only the second time in U.S. history, most members of Congress can be found hiding under their beds. A usually long-winded group known to wax on effortlessly about everything from what to name an airport to the price of wheat, the majority of them clam up when the subject turns to impeachment.
NEWS
October 27, 1998 | FAYE FIORE
They say the eyes are the window to the soul. But in politics, the eyes mean zip. It's the hair. Take Gray Davis. Polls show he is on his way to becoming California's first Democratic governor in 16 years. He has excellent hair (we know this from his hairdresser of 30 years, who talked). Then take his Republican opponent, Dan Lungren. He is tanking in the polls, and he has bad hair (details to come). We aren't making this up. Reference a recent letter to this newspaper from reader J.R.
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