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Legislators United States

NEWS
March 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Secret Service agents questioned a Vermont man who admitted sending packages that contained gunpowder to two U.S. senators. The agents did not arrest or name the man after interviewing him at his home in the northeast Vermont town of Island Pond. The gunpowder discolored and temporarily numbed the hands of two aides and another person in the office of Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) when they opened a package that arrived Monday at his Columbus, Ohio, office.
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NEWS
January 27, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As 535 members of Congress return to Washington today to ponder the future of President Clinton, few will be as closely watched as a small group of Democrats whose support is considered essential--and whose defections could prove disastrous. While other lawmakers certainly can influence the course of events, it is this handful of Clinton loyalists who serve as bellwethers of the president's political base within his own party.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five frantic days after the first public allegations about the president and the intern, ABC's Jackie Judd was on the air Sunday morning with another breathless scoop. There was a possible witness to an "intimate encounter" between President Clinton and former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky, Judd told the audience tuning into "This Week." Shortly afterward, NBC News reported they had confirmed the ABC News snippet.
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time, not long ago, when Rep. David E. Price (D-N.C.) had to alert the cops every time he planned a town meeting. Back in the early 1990s, the crowds who came to his meetings were so surly--so angry about President Clinton, about taxes, about politics in general--that Price feared the police would be needed to help keep the peace. Now all that has changed.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An actress who shall remain nameless came to Washington recently to raise the national consciousness about women's health. Political and medical luminaries turned out in force. The first lady attended the luncheon, and all was going splendidly until the actress ducked into a Capitol Hill bathroom to sneak a smoke. Alma Viator, a theatrical agent who had arranged the appearance, nearly passed out.
NEWS
December 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
Amid signs of partisan troubles ahead, congressional Republican leaders appointed their eight members Monday to a bipartisan commission that is to suggest ways to buttress the long-term financial health of Medicare. Five are members of Congress, one is a Medicare recipient who works for Senate Majority Leader Trent Lott (R-Miss.) and the other two work in the health industry. President Clinton did not name his four members, and House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt (D-Mo.
NEWS
September 2, 1997 | From Associated Press
Lawmakers who received contributions from tobacco companies were three times more likely to have voted to block spending to help states fight cigarette sales to minors, says a new analysis by smoking foes. The Food and Drug Administration requested $34 million, to be distributed to states, to enforce new federal rules to prevent teenage tobacco sales. The full Senate is expected to decide this week how much anti-tobacco money to give the FDA.
NEWS
September 1, 1997 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They left town on a bipartisan high after reaching a historic compact with the White House to balance the federal budget while cutting taxes. But as members of Congress return to work this week from their August recess, their summer of love appears likely to beget an autumn of trench warfare. The budget deal, in fact, may have made a partisan bloodletting inevitable by blurring the philosophical distinctions between the two parties.
NEWS
August 15, 1997 | RONALD BROWNSTEIN, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
With optimism about the nation's direction rising to its highest level since the Gulf War, Americans give increasingly high marks to both President Clinton and congressional incumbents, according to a national survey scheduled for release today.
NEWS
June 14, 1997 | SARA FRITZ and JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
In the past, while many members of Congress were invited to take expenses-paid trips to Taiwan, few of them got invitations to mainland China. But according to congressional financial disclosure reports made public Friday, at least a dozen members of Congress made all-expenses-paid trips to Beijing and other destinations inside China last year--providing yet another indication that the Chinese government has stepped up efforts to win influence in Washington.
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