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Legislators United States

NEWS
December 8, 1998 | FAYE FIORE
They were just getting to the part about House ethics in the new members' orientation one Friday last month when the South Bay's new Republican congressman, Steve Kuykendall, had to duck out to attend to a matter of great urgency. He had to look at an apartment. It was a 1950s-bland studio in a building called Hill House, where about half the tenants are members of Congress and the manager is a guy named Buzz. It was $750 a month and Kuykendall took it on the spot.
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NEWS
December 6, 1998 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just days before they are likely to cast an epic vote on whether to impeach a president for only the second time in U.S. history, most members of Congress can be found hiding under their beds. A usually long-winded group known to wax on effortlessly about everything from what to name an airport to the price of wheat, the majority of them clam up when the subject turns to impeachment.
NEWS
September 8, 1998 | Associated Press
Rep. Randy "Duke" Cunningham made an obscene hand gesture and swore at an elderly constituent during a speech to fellow prostate cancer patients. Cunningham also made a crude reference to an openly gay colleague, Rep. Barney Frank. The Escondido Republican later apologized to the constituent and for the reference. The heated exchange occurred Saturday before about 100 people at the San Diego Rehabilitation Institute.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
Secret Service agents questioned a Vermont man who admitted sending packages that contained gunpowder to two U.S. senators. The agents did not arrest or name the man after interviewing him at his home in the northeast Vermont town of Island Pond. The gunpowder discolored and temporarily numbed the hands of two aides and another person in the office of Sen. John Glenn (D-Ohio) when they opened a package that arrived Monday at his Columbus, Ohio, office.
NEWS
January 27, 1998 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As 535 members of Congress return to Washington today to ponder the future of President Clinton, few will be as closely watched as a small group of Democrats whose support is considered essential--and whose defections could prove disastrous. While other lawmakers certainly can influence the course of events, it is this handful of Clinton loyalists who serve as bellwethers of the president's political base within his own party.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | ELEANOR RANDOLPH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five frantic days after the first public allegations about the president and the intern, ABC's Jackie Judd was on the air Sunday morning with another breathless scoop. There was a possible witness to an "intimate encounter" between President Clinton and former White House intern Monica S. Lewinsky, Judd told the audience tuning into "This Week." Shortly afterward, NBC News reported they had confirmed the ABC News snippet.
NEWS
January 26, 1998 | JANET HOOK and JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Returning to an environment one senior lawmaker described as "surreal," members of Congress will launch a new legislative session this week in a state of utter turmoil over the furor surrounding President Clinton. House and Senate members, who generally approach a new session with a fresh-start sense of purpose, will reconvene Tuesday dazed, confused and uncertain about some of the most basic facts of political life: Will Clinton deliver his annual State of the Union address as scheduled?
NEWS
December 22, 1997 | JANET HOOK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time, not long ago, when Rep. David E. Price (D-N.C.) had to alert the cops every time he planned a town meeting. Back in the early 1990s, the crowds who came to his meetings were so surly--so angry about President Clinton, about taxes, about politics in general--that Price feared the police would be needed to help keep the peace. Now all that has changed.
NEWS
December 21, 1997 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An actress who shall remain nameless came to Washington recently to raise the national consciousness about women's health. Political and medical luminaries turned out in force. The first lady attended the luncheon, and all was going splendidly until the actress ducked into a Capitol Hill bathroom to sneak a smoke. Alma Viator, a theatrical agent who had arranged the appearance, nearly passed out.
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