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OPINION
July 31, 1988 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe directs the Study of State Legislative Leadership at USC's Institute of Politics and Government
When Gov. George Deukmejian signed the state's new $44-billion budget on July 8, he praised California's lawmakers. "I would like to commend the Legislature," he said, "for making a serious effort to send me a balanced budget with a prudent reserve." It was a rare, conciliatory sop from a frequently contentious chief executive. Politically the ride has been a little bumpy for Deukmejian lately. The so-called "Iron Duke" has sustained large chinks in his armor.
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BUSINESS
July 14, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A long-dormant conflict over medical malpractice is heating up again at the state Capitol. A coalition of consumer advocates, trial lawyers and the nurses union is preparing to gather signatures for a state ballot initiative to raise the state's cap on certain medical malpractice damages. The campaign wants voters to change a 38-year-old California law that puts a $250,000 cap on the amount of money that juries can award for non-economic "pain and suffering" damages.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1990 | JUDITH FISCHER
In Southern California, a savings and loan institution collapsed and thousands of people lost their life savings. In Northern California, a freeway overpass collapsed and dozens of people lost their lives. A variety of factors contributed to these disasters, but the lack of strategic planning in the California Legislature may also have played a part.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | JULIE TAMAKI and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
SACRAMENTO -- State lawmakers approved legislation Thursday that will allow millions of Californians to contribute more money tax-free to 401(k) plans, individual retirement accounts and education IRAs. Bills introduced by Assemblywoman Ellen Corbett (D-San Leandro) and Sen. Jack Scott (D-Altadena) change the state's tax code so that it conforms with federal tax incentives adopted last year.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2002 | JULIE TAMAKI and MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
SACRAMENTO -- State lawmakers approved legislation Thursday that will allow millions of Californians to contribute more money tax-free to 401(k) plans, individual retirement accounts and education IRAs. Bills introduced by Assemblywoman Ellen Corbett (D-San Leandro) and Sen. Jack Scott (D-Altadena) change the state's tax code so that it conforms with federal tax incentives adopted last year.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressure built Tuesday in the case challenging California's term limit law, after 18 lawmakers joined an effort to overturn it and Secretary of State Bill Jones called on the U.S. Supreme Court to take over the matter, even as a lower court is considering it. "I am running out of time," Jones said Tuesday, noting that candidates can begin declaring they are running for legislative seats in December. "I have to expedite this process."
BUSINESS
July 14, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - A long-dormant conflict over medical malpractice is heating up again at the state Capitol. A coalition of consumer advocates, trial lawyers and the nurses union is preparing to gather signatures for a state ballot initiative to raise the state's cap on certain medical malpractice damages. The campaign wants voters to change a 38-year-old California law that puts a $250,000 cap on the amount of money that juries can award for non-economic "pain and suffering" damages.
SPORTS
May 12, 1991 | DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As political issues go, the NCAA's enforcement procedure would not appear to be a major concern in California. But when the California Senate Committee on Business and Professions meets Monday, it will consider legislation that would prohibit the NCAA from imposing sanctions on California schools unless some standards of legal due process are met.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2012 | By Carla Rivera, Los Angeles Times
Faced with deep funding cuts and strong student demand, Santa Monica College is pursuing a plan to offer a selection of higher-cost classes to students who need them, provoking protests from some who question the fairness of such a two-tiered education system. Under the plan, approved by the governing board and believed to be the first of its kind in the nation, the two-year college would create a nonprofit foundation to offer such in-demand classes as English and math at a cost of about $200 per unit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1990
In response to "Tell Sacramento That's the Limit," by Pete Schabarum, Commentary, Oct. 11: Schabarum, who is in his fifth term as a county supervisor, having served 18 years already, gave his maximum of 12 years. He suggested "with new blood in the Legislature, California could restore the state's good-government reputation." Apparently he has double standards. If he really believes that new blood would help restore good-government reputation, then he should take a permanent retirement.
NEWS
September 17, 1997 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pressure built Tuesday in the case challenging California's term limit law, after 18 lawmakers joined an effort to overturn it and Secretary of State Bill Jones called on the U.S. Supreme Court to take over the matter, even as a lower court is considering it. "I am running out of time," Jones said Tuesday, noting that candidates can begin declaring they are running for legislative seats in December. "I have to expedite this process."
SPORTS
May 12, 1991 | DANNY ROBBINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As political issues go, the NCAA's enforcement procedure would not appear to be a major concern in California. But when the California Senate Committee on Business and Professions meets Monday, it will consider legislation that would prohibit the NCAA from imposing sanctions on California schools unless some standards of legal due process are met.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 1990 | JUDITH FISCHER
In Southern California, a savings and loan institution collapsed and thousands of people lost their life savings. In Northern California, a freeway overpass collapsed and dozens of people lost their lives. A variety of factors contributed to these disasters, but the lack of strategic planning in the California Legislature may also have played a part.
OPINION
July 31, 1988 | Sherry Bebitch Jeffe, Sherry Bebitch Jeffe directs the Study of State Legislative Leadership at USC's Institute of Politics and Government
When Gov. George Deukmejian signed the state's new $44-billion budget on July 8, he praised California's lawmakers. "I would like to commend the Legislature," he said, "for making a serious effort to send me a balanced budget with a prudent reserve." It was a rare, conciliatory sop from a frequently contentious chief executive. Politically the ride has been a little bumpy for Deukmejian lately. The so-called "Iron Duke" has sustained large chinks in his armor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 11, 1988
Deukmejian's signing of the California Clean Air Act (AB 2595) by Assemblyman Byron Sher (D-Palo Alto), establishes a working partnership between the Air Resources Board and local air-pollution districts in the state. The goal is to attain the air-quality standards so that all Californians may breathe healthful air. This bill is the product of difficult compromises by supporters and opponents over the two years of its journey through the Legislature. California is again leading the way in air-pollution control with new technology and new laws.
OPINION
November 20, 2003
Dan Schnur may be right that "elections are won from the center" (Commentary, Nov. 17). But Schnur sounds more like a political consultant and less like a Republican, especially when he talks about "extremists on both ends of the political spectrum." A Republican president looks like he'll be reelected based on two factors: the positive effect on the economy from his tax cuts and his earned reputation for keeping the nation safe from another terrorist attack. Backed by that national environment and by the failed policies of a Democrat-controlled state Legislature, California Republicans can win by emphasizing and articulating conservative principles of limited government, fiscal discipline and personal responsibility.
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