Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegislatures Budget
IN THE NEWS

Legislatures Budget

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | PAUL JACOBS and DANIEL M. WEINTRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
When the California Supreme Court upheld Proposition 140's term limits and staff cuts Thursday, the justices ensured that power would swing from the Legislature and toward the governor, lobbyists and bureaucrats, a number of politicians said. Vast consequences that the electorate never intended will mean that faceless bureaucrats will have more say over Californians' lives than elected representatives, some warn.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013 | By Chris Megerian, Los Angeles Times
SACRAMENTO - The decision to furlough state employees during the financial crises of recent years may have saved money in the short term but will leave a big bill down the road, the Legislature's budget advisors said Thursday. The state will owe $1 billion extra to many workers when they retire or quit, for vacation time that went unused while they were being forced to take unpaid days off. The furloughs were intended to save $5 billion from February 2009 to July 2013, effectively cutting workers' pay 5% to 14%. The $1 billion for unused vacation - some in excess of state accrual limits - will eat into those savings, according to a report by the nonpartisan Legislative Analyst's Office.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 11, 1991 | PHILIP HAGER, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
The California Supreme Court, clearing the way for a sweeping turnover in the state Legislature, on Thursday affirmed the constitutionality of Proposition 140, the term-limit initiative passed by voters last November.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 19, 2010 | By Jack Dolan, Los Angeles Times
The Legislature's chief budget analyst advised lawmakers Tuesday to reject Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger's plan to eliminate the state's welfare program and end subsidized daycare for hundreds of thousands of low-income children. Legislative analyst Mac Taylor, whom both Democrats and Republicans look to for guidance on state spending, suggested lawmakers instead cut other programs and raise taxes modestly to close California's $19.1-billion budget deficit. Welfare and child care "are core pieces of the state's safety net, and we therefore recommend that the Legislature reject these proposals," Taylor wrote in an assessment of Schwarzenegger's plan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2002 | George Skelton
Can the Legislature be fixed so it no longer plays fiddle-faddle and rants rubbish all summer? So it stops blowing off the California Constitution and the public and passes a budget on time? Of course. Some tinkering would help. But what this structure really needs is outright demolition. There's increasing talk about it after the Legislature--specifically the Assembly--postured and vacillated for 62 days into the new fiscal year before finally passing a $98-billion budget.
OPINION
July 21, 1991
California voters managed to dodge most of the taxes suggested on the ballot last fall and look what happens now--the spendthrifts in Sacramento bump the sales tax 1.25%, make junk food taxable (but not if one pays with federal food stamps) and finally ups the gallonage tax on beverage retailers! How many already marginal retailers will see their businesses shrivel and wither due to decreased sales? Aren't we taxed enough already? The voters must get off their collective duffs and vote out all the rascals (to be kind)
NATIONAL
February 9, 2010 | By Geraldine Baum
This is how bad it is for David Paterson, Democratic governor of New York: His major opponent in the primary is ahead of him in the polls and has six times more money in his war chest. The president of the United States has made it clear that he doesn't want him to run. Even friends are discouraging him. The state's $8.2-billion budget deficit keeps ratcheting up, and the governor can't seem to agree on anything with members of the state Legislature that, after almost 50 years, is narrowly controlled by his own party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 2009 | Evan Halper and Eric Bailey
California could run out of money as soon as July, the Legislature's chief budget analyst warned Thursday, as a new poll showed voters poised to reject five budget-related measures on the May 19 ballot. If the propositions do not pass, the state could find itself as much as $23 billion short of the money it needs to pay its bills over the next year, according to a new forecast by Legislative Analyst Mac Taylor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2009 | Jordan Rau and Evan Halper
The plan that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and lawmakers approved last month to fill California's giant budget hole has already fallen out of balance with a projected $8-billion shortfall, the Legislature's nonpartisan budget analyst said Friday. After analyzing recent data showing rapidly rising unemployment and lower-than-expected economic growth, Legislative Analyst Mac Taylor said the state is on track to have even less money than lawmakers anticipated in February.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2005 | Nancy Vogel, Times Staff Writer
More than three weeks late and with little enthusiasm or debate, the Legislature on Thursday passed California's spending plan for the new fiscal year. The budget, hammered out two days earlier by Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger and legislative leaders, cleared both the Senate and Assembly with votes to spare. Republicans and Democrats alike, however, offered only grudging support, calling it "highly compromised" and "nothing to be proud of."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2002 | George Skelton
Can the Legislature be fixed so it no longer plays fiddle-faddle and rants rubbish all summer? So it stops blowing off the California Constitution and the public and passes a budget on time? Of course. Some tinkering would help. But what this structure really needs is outright demolition. There's increasing talk about it after the Legislature--specifically the Assembly--postured and vacillated for 62 days into the new fiscal year before finally passing a $98-billion budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 2002 | JULIE TAMAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers took a crucial step Wednesday toward erasing an anticipated $12.5-billion budget shortfall by trimming nearly $2.2 billion from California's current spending plan. Gov. Gray Davis proposed a series of reductions in November in response to the state's growing fiscal woes. The more than 80 proposals cut or delay spending on everything from social services to criminal justice, with education taking the biggest hit.
NEWS
June 9, 1998 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Assemblyman Joe Baca, appearing before the Legislature's budget committee, opened his pitch for pork Monday by requesting that the new state budget contain money for 20 projects in his Inland Empire district. "I'm going to make it short," Baca (D-San Bernardino) promised with a straight face. When a senator on the budget committee chided him about his lengthy list of requests, Baca responded, "I'm just trying to take care of my district." By the time he was done, Baca had requested $20.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1995 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and JOSH MEYER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An entourage of Los Angeles County supervisors and top officials descended on the state Capitol with hat in hand Monday, pleading for a way out of the county's worst fiscal crisis in memory, but their appeals went unanswered. Faced with a $1.2-billion budget deficit that threatens to trigger deep cuts in county services, some of the most powerful local officials in the state spent a remarkable day roaming the halls of the Legislature in a desperate search for dollars.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|