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March 19, 1991
China's National People's Congress (NPC) meets beginning Monday to endorse a new Five-Year Plan (1991-1995) that has already been approved by the Communist Party Central Committee. The plan reportedly includes further cautious steps toward decentralized economic decision-making, gradual elimination of subsidies and a more market-oriented economy.
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NEWS
March 14, 1999 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
China's legislature will pass a new law strengthening its constitutionally mandated powers of supervision over the government and judiciary, according to officials attending the annual session of the National People's Congress, or NPC. Officials did not give a timetable, but they expressed confidence that the NPC Supervision Law will be passed within the legislature's current five-year session, which ends in 2003.
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NEWS
March 14, 1999 | ANTHONY KUHN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
China's legislature will pass a new law strengthening its constitutionally mandated powers of supervision over the government and judiciary, according to officials attending the annual session of the National People's Congress, or NPC. Officials did not give a timetable, but they expressed confidence that the NPC Supervision Law will be passed within the legislature's current five-year session, which ends in 2003.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | Associated Press
Despite an outcry from pro-democracy groups, Hong Kong lawmakers Tuesday exempted the Chinese state and post-colonial Hong Kong government from some privacy and antidiscrimination laws. Though the exemptions also applied to the British crown and the colonial government, critics worry that Beijing will chip away at the rights and freedoms of Hong Kong's 6.6 million people. Britain handed Hong Kong back to China on July 1. With protesters shouting "Shameful! Shameful!"
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a house pet unexpectedly turning on its master, China's normally docile, rubber-stamp Parliament took a bite Monday at a senior leader--or at least let out a loud growl. In the largest known "no" vote in the history of Communist China's legislature, 722 delegates to the National People's Congress voted against promoting Politburo member Li Tieying to an additional post as a state councilor. Another 137 delegates abstained. As the only nominee, Li still got the job, with 2,037 votes.
NEWS
March 9, 1993
China's rubber-stamp legislature, the National People's Congress, opens its annual two-week session Monday. The congress is expected to approve a number of predetermined shifts in high government positions. President Yang Shangkun, 85, is due to step down. Communist Party General Secretary Jiang Zemin is widely expected to replace him while continuing to serve concurrently as party chief.
NEWS
April 8, 1998 | Associated Press
Despite an outcry from pro-democracy groups, Hong Kong lawmakers Tuesday exempted the Chinese state and post-colonial Hong Kong government from some privacy and antidiscrimination laws. Though the exemptions also applied to the British crown and the colonial government, critics worry that Beijing will chip away at the rights and freedoms of Hong Kong's 6.6 million people. Britain handed Hong Kong back to China on July 1. With protesters shouting "Shameful! Shameful!"
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite being dubbed "the incredible shrinking governor" this week, Chris Patten, Hong Kong's last colonial leader, is showing that he is not about to step quietly aside before China takes control of the territory in 1997. On Wednesday, Patten convened Hong Kong's first fully elected and all-Chinese legislature--the product of controversial democratic reforms that infuriated China--calling it a "historic council."
NEWS
October 12, 1995 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite being dubbed "the incredible shrinking governor" this week, Chris Patten, Hong Kong's last colonial leader, is showing that he is not about to step quietly aside before China takes control of the territory in 1997. On Wednesday, Patten convened Hong Kong's first fully elected and all-Chinese legislature--the product of controversial democratic reforms that infuriated China--calling it a "historic council."
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Like a house pet unexpectedly turning on its master, China's normally docile, rubber-stamp Parliament took a bite Monday at a senior leader--or at least let out a loud growl. In the largest known "no" vote in the history of Communist China's legislature, 722 delegates to the National People's Congress voted against promoting Politburo member Li Tieying to an additional post as a state councilor. Another 137 delegates abstained. As the only nominee, Li still got the job, with 2,037 votes.
NEWS
March 9, 1993
China's rubber-stamp legislature, the National People's Congress, opens its annual two-week session Monday. The congress is expected to approve a number of predetermined shifts in high government positions. President Yang Shangkun, 85, is due to step down. Communist Party General Secretary Jiang Zemin is widely expected to replace him while continuing to serve concurrently as party chief.
NEWS
March 19, 1991
China's National People's Congress (NPC) meets beginning Monday to endorse a new Five-Year Plan (1991-1995) that has already been approved by the Communist Party Central Committee. The plan reportedly includes further cautious steps toward decentralized economic decision-making, gradual elimination of subsidies and a more market-oriented economy.
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