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NEWS
March 4, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the support of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's coalition and opposition Liberal Democrats, Parliament's upper house today made final the enactment of Japan's most drastic political reforms since the post-World War II occupation era. The laws enacted today fill in enforcement dates omitted from an eleventh-hour, stop-gap passage of the bills Jan. 29.
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NEWS
March 4, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the support of Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's coalition and opposition Liberal Democrats, Parliament's upper house today made final the enactment of Japan's most drastic political reforms since the post-World War II occupation era. The laws enacted today fill in enforcement dates omitted from an eleventh-hour, stop-gap passage of the bills Jan. 29.
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NEWS
January 21, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite threats of a rebellion among its own supporters, Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's coalition Thursday decided to put to a final vote today four political reform bills that would overturn Japan's post-World War II political structure.
NEWS
January 21, 1994 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite threats of a rebellion among its own supporters, Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa's coalition Thursday decided to put to a final vote today four political reform bills that would overturn Japan's post-World War II political structure.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese Parliament voted Wednesday to extend its session by 45 days until Jan. 29, giving Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa breathing room to hang on to his job and fulfill his pledge of passing political reform. Just minutes before the midnight deadline, the powerful lower house approved the extension, despite a boycott by all but four members of the opposition Liberal Democratic Party. Six Socialist members of the governing coalition and the Communists also opposed the extension.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the Year of the Rooster, according to the Asian lunar calendar, but 1993 will be nothing to crow about in Japan. As the Japanese Parliament opens its 126th session today, it faces myriad tough issues ranging from a moribund economy to political scandal to a ballooning trade surplus. Noting the urgent need to kick-start the economy and restore public trust in government, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa this week declared 1993 "the year in which the nation's democracy will be tested."
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A campaign began Wednesday for an election July 26 that will measure how big an interim step Japan's ruling party can take to restore its power in the upper house of Parliament. The ballot--for 127 of the 252 seats in the upper house--also shapes up both as a referendum on a law passed last month that will enable Japan to dispatch noncombat troops overseas and as the first nationwide test for Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, who took office last November.
NEWS
December 16, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Japanese Parliament voted Wednesday to extend its session by 45 days until Jan. 29, giving Prime Minister Morihiro Hosokawa breathing room to hang on to his job and fulfill his pledge of passing political reform. Just minutes before the midnight deadline, the powerful lower house approved the extension, despite a boycott by all but four members of the opposition Liberal Democratic Party. Six Socialist members of the governing coalition and the Communists also opposed the extension.
NEWS
January 22, 1993 | TERESA WATANABE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's the Year of the Rooster, according to the Asian lunar calendar, but 1993 will be nothing to crow about in Japan. As the Japanese Parliament opens its 126th session today, it faces myriad tough issues ranging from a moribund economy to political scandal to a ballooning trade surplus. Noting the urgent need to kick-start the economy and restore public trust in government, Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa this week declared 1993 "the year in which the nation's democracy will be tested."
NEWS
July 9, 1992 | SAM JAMESON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A campaign began Wednesday for an election July 26 that will measure how big an interim step Japan's ruling party can take to restore its power in the upper house of Parliament. The ballot--for 127 of the 252 seats in the upper house--also shapes up both as a referendum on a law passed last month that will enable Japan to dispatch noncombat troops overseas and as the first nationwide test for Prime Minister Kiichi Miyazawa, who took office last November.
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