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NEWS
November 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
In an unprecedented show of strength, Mexican lawmakers rejected a routine request from President Ernesto Zedillo to attend a summit in Canada. The opposition majority in the lower house of Congress, the Chamber of Deputies, told Zedillo he had failed to provide sufficient justification to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vancouver, Canada, on Nov. 22-25 and asked him to resubmit the request with more information. The lower house also barred Zedillo from a planned Dec.
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NEWS
November 6, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
In an unprecedented show of strength, Mexican lawmakers rejected a routine request from President Ernesto Zedillo to attend a summit in Canada. The opposition majority in the lower house of Congress, the Chamber of Deputies, told Zedillo he had failed to provide sufficient justification to attend the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit in Vancouver, Canada, on Nov. 22-25 and asked him to resubmit the request with more information. The lower house also barred Zedillo from a planned Dec.
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WORLD
October 6, 2010 | By Ken Ellingwood, Los Angeles Times
Amid a bloody war against drug cartels, Mexican President Felipe Calderon said Wednesday that he was sending Congress a plan to overhaul the country's police system by doing away with local forces, long a weak link in law enforcement. The proposed reform, which would require amending the Mexican Constitution, would eliminate the nation's 2,000 municipal departments, where officers tend to be undertrained and ill-paid and are seen as vulnerable to corruption by criminal groups. Patrol duties in towns and cities would be taken over by the 31 states.
NEWS
June 17, 1985 | JUAN M. VASQUEZ, Times Staff Writer
As an opposition candidate for governor, white-haired Adalberto Rosas would appear to have as much chance of success as a snowball in the desert climate of Sonora, where summer temperatures of 110 degrees are not uncommon. The ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party, after all, has never lost a gubernatorial election in Mexico. The PRI controls Congress, including every seat in the Senate.
NATIONAL
November 16, 2013 | By Cindy Carcamo
ALBUQUERQUE - A high-desert city in one of the poorest states in the nation has become the abortion debate's latest battlefield and a testing ground for whether abortion limits can be imposed on the local level. Early voting is underway in Albuquerque for an election Tuesday, which will decide whether to ban abortions after 20 weeks of pregnancy. Although similar bans have been passed by state legislatures, New Mexico's largest city is believed to be the first municipality in the country to place such an initiative on a ballot.
MAGAZINE
October 4, 1992 | LYDIA CHAVEZ, Lydia Chavez reported from Central and South America from 1983 to 1986 for the New York Times and currently is a journalism professor at UC Berkeley.
It is 2:30 in the afternoon in Mexico City, and fleets of Town Cars, Cadillacs and Thunderbirds are arriving in Polanco, a neighborhood of old mansions that Mexico's economic miracle has transformed into a collection of smart little restaurants and boutiques. At Isadora's, where the glass is beveled and the pastry dough is paper-thin, businessmen in Armani suits and Hermes ties briefly lay down their cellular telephones to pick up luncheon menus.
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