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NEWS
December 19, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of war, corruption and financial uncertainty, voters across Russia today will elect a new Duma, the house of parliament that has served as the focal point for Communist opposition to President Boris N. Yeltsin. An estimated 64 million voters will choose from 26 party slates vying for seats in parliament's lower chamber.
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NEWS
June 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's first major political setback, regional leaders voted down his proposal to strip them of their seats in parliament, part of his ambitious plan to curb the rights of the provinces. The governors and heads of local legislatures who make up the upper house of parliament, the Federation Council, voted 129 to 13 to reject the bill, which would replace them with appointed legislators. The bill also would remove the regional leaders' immunity from prosecution.
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NEWS
June 29, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
In Russian President Vladimir V. Putin's first major political setback, regional leaders voted down his proposal to strip them of their seats in parliament, part of his ambitious plan to curb the rights of the provinces. The governors and heads of local legislatures who make up the upper house of parliament, the Federation Council, voted 129 to 13 to reject the bill, which would replace them with appointed legislators. The bill also would remove the regional leaders' immunity from prosecution.
NEWS
December 19, 1999 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Against a backdrop of war, corruption and financial uncertainty, voters across Russia today will elect a new Duma, the house of parliament that has served as the focal point for Communist opposition to President Boris N. Yeltsin. An estimated 64 million voters will choose from 26 party slates vying for seats in parliament's lower chamber.
NEWS
June 22, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Kremlin's bow to Chechen commandos to win freedom for more than 1,000 hostages exacted a political toll Wednesday when deputies of the lower house of the Russian Parliament voted "no confidence" in the government over its handling of the crisis. After the gunmen who had waged a fatal rampage escaped into the sheltering hills of Chechnya, parliamentary deputies of all political walks directed their hunt for scapegoats at Prime Minister Viktor S.
NEWS
January 14, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lawmakers elected a close ally of President Boris N. Yeltsin as Speaker of Russia's equivalent of the U.S. Senate on Thursday in a sign that the legislative body will be more conciliatory than the old Parliament, which Yeltsin dissolved in September. First Deputy Prime Minister Vladimir F.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's new Cabinet, fending off predictions that it will try to run the country Soviet-style, maintained Monday that it will stick to free-market reforms and tight spending. "The tough financial policy will not be eased to any degree," Prime Minister Viktor S. Chernomyrdin said. "Nobody has changed the program of reforms." Alexander N.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Handed an economic report card reading "Needs Improvement" on most points, Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's Cabinet fought back hard Thursday at a pivotal session of Parliament that would determine its future. The Congress of People's Deputies continued to mull over exactly how it would show its dissatisfaction with Yeltsin's economic reforms, either by stripping Yeltsin of some of his special powers, forcing him to appoint a new prime minister or requiring him to reorganize the government.
NEWS
December 1, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For more than 1,000 deputies from the far reaches of Russia, today is their day. It is the day they gather in Moscow to watch their president sweat through his defense of a year of reforms that unleashed 2,000% inflation and failed to halt Russia's economic collapse. It is the day they get their chance at revenge, as they plot parliamentary moves that could bring down President Boris N. Yeltsin's Cabinet and strip him of his special powers to rule by decree.
NEWS
November 12, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Downplaying President Boris N. Yeltsin's warning that his opponents may try a "revanchist coup," hard-line Russian politicians said Wednesday that the imminent danger facing the country is Yeltsin's own plan to reimpose totalitarianism by blotting out the legislative branch. "There exists a real threat to the constitutional system in Russia," three members of the Russian legislature said in a statement.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | Associated Press
Russian legislators agreed Thursday to consider a motion appealing to Monica S. Lewinsky to help halt the attack on Iraq. "The state Duma appeals to Ms. Lewinsky to undertake corresponding measures to restrain the emotions of Bill Clinton," said the motion by nationalist lawmaker Alexander Filatov. The motion was approved on a vote in the Duma, the lower chamber of parliament, to be considered for inclusion in a broader resolution denouncing the attack on Iraq.
NEWS
June 24, 1998 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Setting up a showdown with Communist lawmakers over Russia's economic future, President Boris N. Yeltsin issued a veiled threat Tuesday to dissolve parliament if it does not quickly adopt a package of emergency fiscal measures. At a rare joint session of Cabinet members and lawmakers to address Russia's mounting financial crisis, Yeltsin and Prime Minister Sergei V.
NEWS
January 23, 1997 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Parading its political irrelevance as proudly as the emperor who wore no clothes, Russia's lower house of parliament launched an impeachment motion against President Boris N. Yeltsin on Wednesday only to watch it fizzle amid the deputies' legendary discord. Communists and deputies of the ultranationalist Liberal Democratic Party demanded a vote to remove Yeltsin from office on the grounds that the ailing president has been out of the Kremlin for all but two weeks since his July 3 reelection.
NEWS
December 20, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the fate of one leading reformer still hanging in the balance, Russia's democrats flogged themselves Tuesday for divisions that cost them heavily in parliamentary elections, while giving fresh indications that they will continue quarreling until the presidential vote in June. The reinvigorated Communist Party and those loyal to ultranationalist hothead Vladimir V.
NEWS
November 16, 1995 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Despite a court challenge that could halt the whole exercise, Russia's second nationwide election campaign of the post-Soviet era got off to a crowded start Wednesday with a parade of televised ads by some of the 5,649 candidates for Parliament. The Dec. 17 vote is a critical showdown between President Boris N. Yeltsin's government and the Communists and nationalists who are hostile to free markets, civil liberties and the West.
NEWS
July 2, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin and his government wrested political victory from threatened humiliation Saturday when parliamentary rivals fell short in a no-confidence vote and capitulated in Russia's latest high-stakes power struggle.
NEWS
October 22, 1992 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin suffered an ominous political defeat Wednesday when lawmakers refused his request to postpone the coming session of the Russian Parliament, dooming him to a perilous round of attacks on his government this December.
NEWS
December 23, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin assured the world Wednesday that despite neo-fascist election gains, he remains firmly in charge until 1996, Russia has a solid new constitution and--who knows?--even the new Parliament may not be so bad. In his first public comments on right-wing populist Vladimir V. Zhirinovsky's massive voter support, Yeltsin said soothingly that the election results should not be given a "tragic tenor."
NEWS
July 1, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Boris N. Yeltsin on Friday fired three top officials for negligence during a deadly hostage crisis last month, but he left in office Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev, the most hawkish and hated of his Cabinet members. The sackings were expected to appease Russia's unruly lower house of Parliament, the Duma, ahead of a threatened no-confidence vote in the government today.
NEWS
June 30, 1995 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Russia's top military, police and security chiefs on Thursday offered to resign for the deadly bungling of a hostage crisis earlier this month, but President Boris N. Yeltsin put off a decision on which heads should roll until after a faceoff with Parliament on Saturday. The mea culpas offered by Defense Minister Pavel S. Grachev, Interior Minister Viktor F. Yerin, security forces chief Sergei V.
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