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HEALTH
January 31, 2005 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight can be reached at kvoightla@aol.com.
Those of us who spend much of our time sitting in the car, behind a desk and then in front of the TV need to counteract all the forward bending we do. Slouching forward shortens the muscles in the front of the spine and overstretches the muscles at the back of the spine. This move reverses that action. Practicing it regularly helps develop balanced muscles so you can maintain the correct position of your spine.
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HEALTH
March 28, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
When it comes to training your abdominals, it's important to include the deepest layer of this muscle group ? the transversus abdominis, which is responsible for flattening the stomach. Here is a great way to target this area. Lie face up on a flat, level surface. If you have a Pilates Circle, place it between your inner ankles and straighten your legs above your hips. (If you don't have this piece of equipment, you can do the same exercise without it.) Extend your arms to the sides and bend your elbows so that your hands are over your head.
HEALTH
February 28, 2014 | By Melinda Fulmer
Forget crunches. The V-up takes your abdominal workout to the next level. Orthopedist and fitness trainer Dr. Levi Harrison, who produced a DVD, "The Art of Fitness Cardio Core Workout," shows how to work up to this advanced move in stages so you don't strain your lower back. What it does This intense move challenges all of the muscles in your core - front to back. What to do Start by lying down flat with your legs long, abdominals tucked in and back pressed into the floor.
HEALTH
September 20, 2013 | By Melinda Fulmer
The burpee exercise done with a medicine ball is a wonder in efficiency, working several muscle groups at once, while raising your heart rate to burn fat, says Dr. Levi Harrison, orthopedic surgeon and developer of the Art of Fitness Cardio Core Workout. What it does This explosive move works the muscles of your legs, chest, arms and shoulders. What to do Start by standing with legs more than hip-width apart, clutching a medicine ball of 2 to 10 pounds at your chest with both hands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 5, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
SAN DIEGO - When the group got to the bowling alley, 19-year-old Stephen Priest loudly demanded a discount. "We won't have to rent shoes," Priest shouted. "We don't have any legs!" Call it amputee humor. Therapists say it's a healthy defense mechanism against an outside world full of people who may gawk and ask intrusive questions. As a paratrooper with the Army's 82nd Airborne Division, Pfc. Priest lost both legs above the knee and his left arm was mangled when a buried bomb blew up in Afghanistan in mid-May.
HEALTH
October 3, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
If your back feels stiff and tight, try lying on the floor for a few minutes and hugging your knees into your chest. This is a safe and effective way to release tight muscles in your back, legs and groin. Lie on your back with your feet flat on the floor and knees bent (you can place a small folded towel under your head for comfort). Bend your right knee into your chest and pause. Check that the back of your hips remains on the floor. Elongate your neck by moving your shoulders down away from your ears.
HEALTH
July 25, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Here are two variations of back arches that will help counter the effects of rounded shoulders. Slouching tends to shorten the muscles in the front of your body and can overstretch the muscles in the back. These moves reverse that action and help improve your posture. Lie face-down on a mat. Bend your knees and bring your heels toward your buttocks. Reach back and grasp each ankle with the same-side's hand. Keep your heels close together and your knees parallel to each other as you inhale and raise your chest and legs away from the floor.
HEALTH
September 8, 2003 | Karen Voight, Karen Voight can be reached at kvoightla@aol.com.
This exercise will strengthen not only your back and gluteal muscles but also will align your spine and stretch out your chest muscles, helping you avoid developing a rounded upper back. * 1 Lie face down on a mat with your legs straight. Reach your arms to the side at shoulder level with the palms facing the floor. Keep your inner legs close together with the soles of your feet facing upward.
SPORTS
February 7, 2013 | By Eric Pincus
Speaking with Stephen A. Smith on ESPN Radio in New York , Dwight Howard said his back is at "75%" and his shoulder is "day to day. " The Lakers center sat the last three games after re-aggravating his shoulder injury.  The team certainly needs him back on the court with Pau Gasol going down with a torn plantar fascia. "There are days when [my shoulder] feels really good and then I get in the game, get hit and it's not as good," said Howard.  "For right now I just have to learn how to play through it and try to mix up my game.  I'm known for always coming up and that leaves me vulnerable to guys hitting me, so I'm going to try to play at 75% and keep the ball up here.
HEALTH
December 29, 2012 | By Melinda Fulmer
Cardio doesn't have to be deadly dull and serious. In this fun animal-inspired exercise, you'll get your heart rate up, build muscle and you might even crack a smile. Called the lateral traveling ape, this move is part of the new "Animal Flow Workout" that body weight fitness pro Mike Fitch developed for Equinox gyms. What it does It's great for entire body conditioning, as it works muscles in the arms, shoulders and legs at the same time it's elevating your heart rate and torching calories.
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