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HEALTH
December 29, 2012 | By Melinda Fulmer
Cardio doesn't have to be deadly dull and serious. In this fun animal-inspired exercise, you'll get your heart rate up, build muscle and you might even crack a smile. Called the lateral traveling ape, this move is part of the new "Animal Flow Workout" that body weight fitness pro Mike Fitch developed for Equinox gyms. What it does It's great for entire body conditioning, as it works muscles in the arms, shoulders and legs at the same time it's elevating your heart rate and torching calories.
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NEWS
January 20, 1985 | RUTH YOUNGBLOOD, United Press International
Multiple sclerosis patient Ed Wojcik lay in his bed in despair, unable to move his legs, focus his eyes or speak intelligibly. Once again, the summer heat was taking its toll, but Wojcik's mind was active. "If astronauts can keep cool and comfortable during space walks despite searing solar radiation, maybe something can be done for me," the retired engineer figured.
HEALTH
July 25, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
Here are two variations of back arches that will help counter the effects of rounded shoulders. Slouching tends to shorten the muscles in the front of your body and can overstretch the muscles in the back. These moves reverse that action and help improve your posture. Lie face-down on a mat. Bend your knees and bring your heels toward your buttocks. Reach back and grasp each ankle with the same-side's hand. Keep your heels close together and your knees parallel to each other as you inhale and raise your chest and legs away from the floor.
HEALTH
March 28, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
When it comes to training your abdominals, it's important to include the deepest layer of this muscle group ? the transversus abdominis, which is responsible for flattening the stomach. Here is a great way to target this area. Lie face up on a flat, level surface. If you have a Pilates Circle, place it between your inner ankles and straighten your legs above your hips. (If you don't have this piece of equipment, you can do the same exercise without it.) Extend your arms to the sides and bend your elbows so that your hands are over your head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Adolf Baguma's caretakers at the orphanage call him their Christmas gift, because it was on Christmas two years ago when they found the 9-year-old in the bushes behind a building in a small Ugandan town. Like many Ugandan children, Baguma was orphaned when AIDS claimed his parents. But he had an extra burden to bear. When he was about 5, the teenage aunt left to care for him got angry and hit him in the back of the legs with flaming banana leaves. Scar tissue from the burns fused each of his legs into a permanently bent position so that he was unable to walk upright.
HEALTH
February 28, 2014 | By Melinda Fulmer
Forget crunches. The V-up takes your abdominal workout to the next level. Orthopedist and fitness trainer Dr. Levi Harrison, who produced a DVD, "The Art of Fitness Cardio Core Workout," shows how to work up to this advanced move in stages so you don't strain your lower back. What it does This intense move challenges all of the muscles in your core - front to back. What to do Start by lying down flat with your legs long, abdominals tucked in and back pressed into the floor.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
BOSTONĀ  -- Celeste Corcoran, 47, of Lowell, Mass., lost both her legs in the marathon explosions. Her daughter Sydney, a 17-year-old high school senior, was also wounded, hit with shrapnel. The two were staying in the same room at Boston Medical Center on Sunday, tended by Celeste's husband, Kevin Corcoran, 48, a truck driver so stoic that he wouldn't admit he, too, had been injured in the bombing. Lacerations on his legs went unattended for two days as he helped his family.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2012 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
To meet the needs of an increasing number of amputees, Naval Medical Center San Diego is expanding its prosthetics lab where service personnel are fitted with artificial limbs and trained to use them. In 2007, when the hospital opened its Comprehensive Combat and Complex Casualty Care (C-5) facility, the prosthetics department was designed to support 40 patients with single amputations. Currently, the department is treating 100 active-duty personnel and 50 retirees, many with multiple amputations, officials said.
NEWS
September 11, 1987 | United Press International
Some 200 protesters, many in wheelchairs, gathered in front of the U.S. Embassy on Thursday to honor peace activist Brian Willson, who lost his legs when struck by a train while demonstrating against military aid to the contras . The group, mostly Americans, sang protest songs in English and Spanish, prayed, read poetry and listened to a message Willson had recorded from his hospital bed. Willson, who has visited Nicaragua and opposes U.S. aid to the contras, lost his legs Sept.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz
A man drove up to three men and opened fire, killing one and injuring the other two in a gang-related shooting early Sunday, authorities said. The three men were standing near the 300 block of West 73rd Street, said Los Angeles Police Officer Norma Eisenman. One man, about 30, was shot in the chest and legs and died at a hospital. The other men were treated for gunshot wounds to their legs, Eisenman said. -- Ari Bloomekatz
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