Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLegs
IN THE NEWS

Legs

SPORTS
March 7, 1992
My curiosity is aroused. After the Winter Olympics, how long did it take the medical profession to get Paula Zahn's legs uncrossed? WILLIAM J. LEWIS Carson
Advertisement
SPORTS
August 4, 2012 | Bill Plaschke
LONDON -- Oscar Pistorius marches into Olympic Stadium with a limping gait of an old man, and the only thing you see, the only place you look, the only thing that matters, are his legs. They are blades. Goodness, they really are blades. Their charcoal tint glistens beneath a sudden London sun. They seem to squeak around a damp midmorning track. He flew the legs here from South Africa in a carry-on bag. He will be delayed after his race because he is removing the legs. PHOTOS: 2012 London Olympics, Day 8 When he drops into the metal starting blocks Saturday morning, becoming the first double-amputee to compete in an Olympics, his legs make it appear he's actually part of the starting blocks.
SCIENCE
September 14, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Gears may seem like a purely human invention. And yet the basic interlocking mechanism found inside grandfather clocks and car steering systems has now turned up in the remarkably powerful legs of young planthopper insects. The discovery, published in Friday's edition of the journal Science, provides the first known example of working gears that evolved in a living being. "It's a wonderful example of the clever solutions that nature comes up with," said Robert Full, a biomechanist at UC Berkeley who was not involved in the study.
HEALTH
September 23, 2002
Legs for Life, sponsored by the Society of Interventional Radiology, offers free information and screening through Saturday on peripheral vascular disease, a common but potentially fatal problem in which the arteries carrying blood to the legs or arms become clogged. (877) 357-2847 or www.legsforlife.org.
SCIENCE
September 18, 2013 | By Karen Kaplan
Microraptor , a small dinosaur that lived in northeast China about 120 million years ago, had feathers on its wings,  hind legs and tail. But in all likelihood, it didn't fly like a bird. Instead, it glided from trees and cruised over “medium distances” - but not very often, according to a study published online Wednesday in Nature Communications. This picture of Microraptor , whose fossils were discovered only 15 years ago, is the result of wind tunnel experiments conducted at the University of Southampton in England.
HEALTH
December 29, 2012 | By Melinda Fulmer
Cardio doesn't have to be deadly dull and serious. In this fun animal-inspired exercise, you'll get your heart rate up, build muscle and you might even crack a smile. Called the lateral traveling ape, this move is part of the new "Animal Flow Workout" that body weight fitness pro Mike Fitch developed for Equinox gyms. What it does It's great for entire body conditioning, as it works muscles in the arms, shoulders and legs at the same time it's elevating your heart rate and torching calories.
NEWS
January 20, 1985 | RUTH YOUNGBLOOD, United Press International
Multiple sclerosis patient Ed Wojcik lay in his bed in despair, unable to move his legs, focus his eyes or speak intelligibly. Once again, the summer heat was taking its toll, but Wojcik's mind was active. "If astronauts can keep cool and comfortable during space walks despite searing solar radiation, maybe something can be done for me," the retired engineer figured.
HEALTH
March 28, 2011 | Karen Voight, Good Form
When it comes to training your abdominals, it's important to include the deepest layer of this muscle group ? the transversus abdominis, which is responsible for flattening the stomach. Here is a great way to target this area. Lie face up on a flat, level surface. If you have a Pilates Circle, place it between your inner ankles and straighten your legs above your hips. (If you don't have this piece of equipment, you can do the same exercise without it.) Extend your arms to the sides and bend your elbows so that your hands are over your head.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 2012 | By Abby Sewell, Los Angeles Times
Adolf Baguma's caretakers at the orphanage call him their Christmas gift, because it was on Christmas two years ago when they found the 9-year-old in the bushes behind a building in a small Ugandan town. Like many Ugandan children, Baguma was orphaned when AIDS claimed his parents. But he had an extra burden to bear. When he was about 5, the teenage aunt left to care for him got angry and hit him in the back of the legs with flaming banana leaves. Scar tissue from the burns fused each of his legs into a permanently bent position so that he was unable to walk upright.
NATIONAL
April 22, 2013 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
BOSTON  -- Celeste Corcoran, 47, of Lowell, Mass., lost both her legs in the marathon explosions. Her daughter Sydney, a 17-year-old high school senior, was also wounded, hit with shrapnel. The two were staying in the same room at Boston Medical Center on Sunday, tended by Celeste's husband, Kevin Corcoran, 48, a truck driver so stoic that he wouldn't admit he, too, had been injured in the bombing. Lacerations on his legs went unattended for two days as he helped his family.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|