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SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Jim Peltz
One moment NASCAR's Tony Stewart was doing what he loves, racing a high-powered sprint car at a small dirt track on a summer night, and the next moment his right leg was shattered. Stewart crashed at full speed into a stalled car in Oskaloosa, Iowa, on Aug. 5. The injury was so gruesome that Stewart later said he "damned near passed out at every doctor visit" when the leg was examined. Despite being one of NASCAR's biggest stars, and a co-owner of a team, Stewart also raced the smaller sprint cars at short tracks nationwide for the sheer joy of it. But the Iowa crash abruptly ended his season and required Stewart to undergo three surgeries and months of physical therapy.
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SPORTS
February 15, 2014 | By Jared S. Hopkins and John Cherwa
SOCHI, Russia - Short-track speedskater Emily Scott was knocked down in the women's 1,500-meter final Saturday as U.S. skaters again fell short of the podium. Scott, 24, took an early lead, but about halfway through the race Korea's Kim Alang wiped out and sent the Springfield, Mo., native into the pads at Iceberg Skating Palace. Scott finished in fifth. "I saw her out of the corner of my eye going down so there was nothing I could do at that point," Scott said. Scott had advanced to the final after Korea's Cho Ha-Ri was penalized in the semifinal.
SPORTS
February 8, 2014 | By Eric Pincus
Steve Nash finally returned to the Lakers' lineup Tuesday in a loss to the Timberwolves in Minneapolis. After sitting out a victory over the Cavaliers in Cleveland the following night, Nash celebrated his 40th birthday with a season-high 19 points in a win over the 76ers in Philadelphia. "To be able to just be back out there for two games -- yeah, I'm rusty, I'm not quite in game shape yet -- but to be moving freely and be able to do things you're accustomed to doing out there, it just makes the game a lot more fun," Nash said after practice Saturday.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | By Lisa Dillman
SOCHI, Russia -- Moguls freestyler Heidi Kloser wasn't about to let a broken leg and torn knee ligaments stop her from marching in the opening ceremony at the Olympics. That's how much the moment meant to the 21-year-old from Vail, Colo. She ended up marching in the parade, on crutches, no less, on Friday. She tweeted a picture of herself, beforehand in Olympic garb, saying: "Excited that I still get to walk!" Just a day earlier, Kloser's Olympic dream came to an end in heartbreaking fashion as she crashed in a training run and had to pull out of the event not long before qualifying started.
SPORTS
February 7, 2014 | From staff reports
Moguls freestyler Heidi Kloser wasn't about to let a broken leg and torn knee ligaments stop her from marching in the opening ceremony at the Olympics. That's how much the moment meant to the 21-year-old from Vail, Colo. She ended up marching in the parade, on crutches, no less, on Friday. She tweeted a picture of herself, beforehand in Olympic garb, saying: "Excited that I still get to walk!" Just a day earlier, Kloser's Olympic dream came to an end as she crashed in a training run and had to pull out of the event not long before qualifying started.
WORLD
February 6, 2014 | By Kate Linthicum
SAFED, Israel - The 9-year-old Syrian boy with no legs wheeled himself down a bright hospital corridor, stopping to accept a pain pill from one nurse and a high-five from another. He has been here for a month, ever since a Syrian government warplane flew low over his village and dropped a bomb that killed two of his cousins and blew apart his lower limbs. Both legs had been amputated by an overworked doctor in an improvised clinic in a cellar. The next day, the boy's grandmother took him and several other injured family members to the Golan Heights border half an hour away and asked the Israeli soldiers on the other side for help.
SPORTS
February 1, 2014 | By Broderick Turner
The Clippers didn't practice Friday and didn't have a shoot-around on Saturday because Coach Doc Rivers preferred to rest their legs instead. It was a strategy that worked for the weary Clippers, who defeated the Utah Jazz, 102-87, Saturday night at Staples Center. The Clippers were in the midst of playing 10 games in 16 days, eight of them on the road. They had played three sets of back-to-back games during that stretch. BOX SCORE: Clippers 102, Jazz 87 So resting their bodies was paramount for Rivers.
SPORTS
January 23, 2014 | By Brad Balukjian
The East Rutherford Seahawks? It's got a weird ring to it, but there's a chance that Mother Nature will give the Seahawks a slight home-field kicking advantage in the Super Bowl on Feb. 2 at MetLife Stadium. The cities of East Rutherford, N.J., and Seattle are both approximately at sea level, while the Denver Broncos' Sports Authority Field rises a mile into the sky, where atmospheric pressure is a lot lower and the air is generally less dense. Broncos kicker Matt Prater is accustomed to kicking in Denver's rarefied air. "In Denver, on average, there are fewer molecules per cubic foot in the air," says Tim Gay, a physicist (and author of the book "The Physics of Football")
SCIENCE
January 13, 2014 | By Geoffrey Mohan
You've met the front of Tiktaalik roseae , the fish-like creature that fills an important gap between fish and four-legged, land-based animals. Now, the hindquarters of the 375-million-year-old fossil are having their close-up moment, and they're showing a pelvis that marks it farther along the evolutionary track from fin to limb. Discovered in the Canadian Arctic in 2004, and introduced to the scientific world two years later, Tiktaalik roseae demonstrates the predictive power of Darwin's theory of evolution -- a transitional creature found on the timeline precisely where the theory assumed it ought to be. Tiktaalik, an Inuit word for “large, freshwater fish,” had a skeletal structure that likely allowed it to support itself with its front and back fins, and “walk” with them, at least in shallow waters, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
SPORTS
December 29, 2013 | By Lance Pugmire
LAS VEGAS - Doctors declared the emergency surgery on Ultimate Fighting Championship fighter Anderson Silva's broken left leg a success Sunday. While Silva's recovery period was set at three to six months, the possibility of the former longtime middleweight champion not fighting again lingers. UFC President Dana White said it's premature to guess whether Silva, 38, has the physical capability or desire to return to fighting. Silva's manager, Ed Soares, said the fighter was "good," resting in a Las Vegas hospital Sunday.
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