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NEWS
October 5, 2010
How high is too high when it comes to your blood pressure? A reading of 140/90 and up is considered high. About two-thirds of Americans older than 65 have high blood pressure, and more may experience pre-hypertension. There's no quick and easy way to reduce blood pressure, but a combination of exercise and eating right can help. DASH, or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension , published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, outlines specific foods and serving sizes for a 2,000-calorie diet that may help bring your numbers down.
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NEWS
October 5, 2010
How high is too high when it comes to your blood pressure? A reading of 140/90 and up is considered high. About two-thirds of Americans older than 65 have high blood pressure, and more may experience pre-hypertension. There's no quick and easy way to reduce blood pressure, but a combination of exercise and eating right can help. DASH, or Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension , published by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, outlines specific foods and serving sizes for a 2,000-calorie diet that may help bring your numbers down.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1988 | ALAN C. MILLER, Times Staff Writer
When Jean-Pierre Hallet won the prestigious 1987 Presidential End Hunger Award, he felt certain that people would finally recognize the promise of his miracle bean. For years, the African adventurer and art dealer had been a harsh critic of the high-profile charity appeals, government programs and rock concerts commonly used to collect food for starving people around the world.
SCIENCE
May 22, 2010 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
Kudzu, a fast-growing and invasive Asian vine introduced in the American South several decades ago, has now blanketed more than 7 million acres of the region, making it sometimes seem more common than the hallmark azaleas, dogwoods and peach trees. Now there's evidence that the plant also increases air pollution. A paper published Monday in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences reported a link between kudzu and the production of ozone, the colorless and odorless gas that is the main component of smog.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 19, 1998
On a cool, crisp winter day, there's little better than a hot, thick bean or pea soup: * Orso: Chef Cliff Roselli's soup repertoire includes both the split pea and potato, and hearty sausage and white bean soups. (Soups, $6.) Orso, 8706 W. 3rd St., Los Angeles, (310) 274-7144. * The Grill: How about a bowl of stick-to-your-ribs, ham-free split pea soup? (Pea soup, cup, $4.25; bowl, $5.50.) The Grill on the Alley, 9560 Dayton Way, Beverly Hills, (310) 276-0615.
FOOD
March 17, 1988 | DIANA SHAW, Shaw is a free-lance writer in Los Angeles.
Every so often a dining companion will dangle a morsel of meat before me and insist, "You don't know what you're missing." Now, a report from a recent symposium on vegetarian nutrition held at Tufts New England Medical Center in Boston tells me exactly what I'm missing--zinc. The best sources of zinc are meats, poultry and fish, so strict vegetarians may suffer deficiencies of this mineral, vital for effective cell repair, timely wound recovery and a sharp sense of taste and smell.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1990 | DAVID NELSON
The menu at Kiva Grill opens with black bean nachos and closes with a sabana of pounded steak rolled around black beans. The black bean appears with such frequency at this new Golden Triangle restaurant, in fact, that to dine in ignorance of it would be to not know beans about the culinary thrust of the place. There is black bean soup and black bean relish, and a bowl or hillock of black beans attends most entrees as garnish.
HEALTH
November 27, 2000 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
Some years ago, a close friend from eastern Washington mentioned that his area of the world is the dried pea and lentil capital of the United States. He even sent us a nifty cookbook produced by a pea and lentil trade group to prove his point. The latest version of "The Pea & Lentil Cookbook: From Everyday to Gourmet" has beautiful color illustrations, lots of recipes and in-depth information about these nutritional superstars.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 28, 1997 | From Times staff and wire reports
Eating more soy products, such as tofu and soy milk, or legumes can reduce the risk of cancer of the uterus, researchers reported Wednesday in the American Journal of Epidemiology. The report adds to a growing body of evidence that phytoestrogens--substances resembling human hormones that are found in plants--can be beneficial to health. Marc Goodman and colleagues at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii studied 332 women who contracted cancer of the uterus from 1985 to 1993.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 1999 | SALLY SCHNEIDER, Sally Schneider is a contributing editor for Food & Wine magazine
I owe a wooing Spaniard for teaching me some primal lessons about dried beans. I suppose he figured extreme measures were in order after our first conversation on a plane from Barcelona, when I described two weeks zigzagging across Spain with a friend, eating and drinking all the local treasures we could find--ham that came from acorn-fed pigs, smooth wood-aged apple brandy distilled by Basques. Flowers would not do for this hungry woman. Catalonia's finest bean might.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2008 | Maria Elena Fernandez, Times Staff Writer
IN two days, we will know the answer to the 8-month-old question: Was CBS nuts to cancel "Jericho" or nuts to bring it back? No matter which decision proves nuttier, the critically acclaimed drama about a Kansas town that survives a national nuclear attack will go down in history as the first TV show saved by a grass-roots Internet movement that involved thousands of fans from around the world -- and more than 20 tons of peanuts. "Jericho" returns on Tuesday with an action-packed seven-episode run that picks up the story from last season's civil war cliffhanger.
HEALTH
May 8, 2006 | Hilary E. MacGregor, Times Staff Writer
WHEN soy burst onto the Western food scene in the early 1990s, the possibilities for the bean seemed boundless. The protein-packed legume had potential to prevent breast cancer, increase bone mass, alleviate hot flashes. It seemed to lower cholesterol, and thus to help prevent heart disease. Millions of dollars were poured into research, and technologists plopped soy into every food imaginable. They ground it into burgers, hot dogs and sausages (Tofurky was born).
FOOD
January 26, 2005 | Regina Schrambling, Special to The Times
ONE of the best things about food is a syndrome I call Cone Contagion: You see someone eating an ice cream and you have to have one yourself. But I never associated it with anything nourishing until a friend happened to e-mail that he was making lentil soup one January night. Lentils suddenly sounded liked the best idea cooking. No other dried beans are ready so fast with so little effort, and none taste as meaty even with no bacon added. They're the right food for right now.
MAGAZINE
December 12, 2004 | ADAM TSCHORN, Adam Tschorn last wrote for the magazine about macadamia nuts.
Every family has its New Year's traditions. In my house it was eating ambrosia, which lost its appeal once my mother explained that the oranges and shredded coconut would not, despite what my mythology books said, confer immortality. For my in-laws, each new year starts with eating black-eyed peas, a Southern custom to ensure good luck.
NEWS
August 14, 2002 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Times are tough for the lowly peanut. Pro-legume president Jimmy Carter is long gone from the White House. Schools and airlines have started banning the snack because of potentially fatal allergies. And peanut sales have sputtered in recent years. So the National Peanut Board did what anyone else would do in such circumstances: It built a 32-foot-high peanut out of steel and foam and began driving it around the U.S.
HEALTH
November 27, 2000 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
Some years ago, a close friend from eastern Washington mentioned that his area of the world is the dried pea and lentil capital of the United States. He even sent us a nifty cookbook produced by a pea and lentil trade group to prove his point. The latest version of "The Pea & Lentil Cookbook: From Everyday to Gourmet" has beautiful color illustrations, lots of recipes and in-depth information about these nutritional superstars.
NEWS
May 16, 1991 | RODNEY BOSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, you might mistake the sizable pod of a fava bean for some sort of vegetable mutation--a farmer's experiment to create the "King of the Limas." Not to worry--it's safe, go ahead and indulge. The pod of this Italian import--grown on a small scale in Ventura County--commonly reaches a bulging eight inches or more. Inside the large, pale green pod--housed in a sponge-like protective layer--are five or six broad beans, which have a taste reminiscent of a lima, the fava's cousin.
NEWS
August 14, 2002 | ROY RIVENBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Times are tough for the lowly peanut. Pro-legume president Jimmy Carter is long gone from the White House. Schools and airlines have started banning the snack because of potentially fatal allergies. And peanut sales have sputtered in recent years. So the National Peanut Board did what anyone else would do in such circumstances: It built a 32-foot-high peanut out of steel and foam and began driving it around the U.S.
MAGAZINE
October 24, 1999 | SALLY SCHNEIDER, Sally Schneider is a contributing editor for Food & Wine magazine
I owe a wooing Spaniard for teaching me some primal lessons about dried beans. I suppose he figured extreme measures were in order after our first conversation on a plane from Barcelona, when I described two weeks zigzagging across Spain with a friend, eating and drinking all the local treasures we could find--ham that came from acorn-fed pigs, smooth wood-aged apple brandy distilled by Basques. Flowers would not do for this hungry woman. Catalonia's finest bean might.
HEALTH
January 25, 1999 | SHELDON MARGEN and DALE A. OGAR
For reasons that seem hard to pin down, the free-spirited hippie generation turned sprouts into a kind of magical food in the '60s and early '70s. Sprouts came to symbolize healthy eating in Berkeley (where this column originates), and Berkeley was then, among other things, the sprout capital of the world.
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