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Leigh Whannell

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
You can always count on a serial killer for some memorable lessons in righteous living. No other type of cinematic villain is so didactic, so fundamentalist in his values, so committed to life coaching. It takes an intolerant ideologue with a black-and-white worldview and a superiority complex to make a moralistic slashegory work these days. In morally uncertain times, psycho always knows best.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
If "The Conjuring" and "Insidious" director James Wan ever made a romantic comedy, one imagines he'd still set it in a creaky old two-story with dark corners and foreboding armoires. For his latest hauntfest "Insidious: Chapter 2," we're back with the possession-afflicted Lambert family - nervous mom Renai (Rose Byrne) and astral-projecting dad Josh (Patrick Wilson) - trying to regroup from the spirit realm trauma that almost took their son Dalton. But there's still the unresolved matter of what happened to supernatural whisperer Elise (Lin Shaye)
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 2013 | By Robert Abele
If "The Conjuring" and "Insidious" director James Wan ever made a romantic comedy, one imagines he'd still set it in a creaky old two-story with dark corners and foreboding armoires. For his latest hauntfest "Insidious: Chapter 2," we're back with the possession-afflicted Lambert family - nervous mom Renai (Rose Byrne) and astral-projecting dad Josh (Patrick Wilson) - trying to regroup from the spirit realm trauma that almost took their son Dalton. But there's still the unresolved matter of what happened to supernatural whisperer Elise (Lin Shaye)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 29, 2004 | Carina Chocano, Times Staff Writer
You can always count on a serial killer for some memorable lessons in righteous living. No other type of cinematic villain is so didactic, so fundamentalist in his values, so committed to life coaching. It takes an intolerant ideologue with a black-and-white worldview and a superiority complex to make a moralistic slashegory work these days. In morally uncertain times, psycho always knows best.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Two guys in a grimy, fluorescent-lit bathroom -- chained, bewildered, staring at a dead body between them -- is how the gruesome new horror film "Saw" opens. Two guys in a clean, sunlit hotel restaurant in West Hollywood is how a press tour for "Saw" begins to wind down. But that fear of the unknown that hangs over the hapless duo on screen could just as easily describe the skittishness coming from "Saw" director James Wan and the film's screenwriter and costar Leigh Whannell.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 28, 2005 | Kevin Crust, Times Staff Writer
Providing your standards aren't too high, "Saw II" is a worthy follow-up to its grisly predecessor. While most horror sequels are more like remakes, this one takes a different tack in continuing the first film's sadistic life-or-death gamesmanship in which a psycho named Jigsaw tortures those he sees as morally weak and unworthy of the gift of life. Placing them in elaborately engineered situations, Jigsaw tests how far his victims are willing to go to save their own lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 2007 | Scott Schueller, Chicago Tribune
The original "Saw" opened anonymously in 2004 and became an unexpected box-office juggernaut, thanks to the writing/directing team of Leigh Whannell and James Wan's original story, graphic violence and edgy feel. Success breeds sequels and, three iterations later, Lionsgate brings us "Saw IV," a film as edgy as a rubber knife. "Saw IV" finds SWAT Commander Rigg (Lyriq Bent) as the most recent puppet of posthumous villain Jigsaw (Tobin Bell).
NEWS
February 17, 2005 | Susan King
The Motorcycle Diaries Gael Garcia Bernal, Rodrigo de la Serna Universal, $30 Brazilian director Walter Salles ("Central Station") directed this acclaimed drama about the arduous journey through South America taken by a young Che Guevara (Gael Garcia Bernal) and his good friend Alberto Granado (Rodrigo de la Serna) in the early 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 10, 2011 | By Noel Murray, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Lincoln Lawyer Lionsgate, $29.95; Blu-ray, $39.99 Anyone who tries to adapt the work of bestselling mystery novelist Michael Connelly in the future should take a long look at this, which gets the author exactly right. Matthew McConaughey plays clever, in-demand attorney Mickey Haller, who works out of his car and never misses an angle; Ryan Phillippe is his latest client, a rich kid accused of a violent crime. The case is nothing that hasn't been seen in hundreds of other legal thrillers, but McConaughey delivers his most charismatic performance in more than a decade, and director Brad Furman (with screenwriter John Romano)
ENTERTAINMENT
March 16, 2007 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
It would seem like the dream of any fledgling filmmaker: A movie made for barely $1 million becomes an accidental franchise that takes in more than $400 million at the box office. Then comes the hard part -- what next? For James Wan and Leigh Whannell, director and writer, respectively, of the original "Saw," the answer is "Dead Silence," opening in theaters today.
NEWS
October 28, 2004 | Robert Abele, Special to The Times
Two guys in a grimy, fluorescent-lit bathroom -- chained, bewildered, staring at a dead body between them -- is how the gruesome new horror film "Saw" opens. Two guys in a clean, sunlit hotel restaurant in West Hollywood is how a press tour for "Saw" begins to wind down. But that fear of the unknown that hangs over the hapless duo on screen could just as easily describe the skittishness coming from "Saw" director James Wan and the film's screenwriter and costar Leigh Whannell.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2013 | By John Horn
That didn't take long. A day after "Insidious: Chapter 2" killed it at the box office, the horror film's makers said they are planning to make a third installment in the franchise. Made for just $5 million, "Insidious: Chapter 2" sold an estimated $41.1 million of tickets in its opening  weekend,  more than three times the $13.3 million the first “Insidious” grossed in 2011. On Monday, the film's financiers -- Entertainment One, FilmDistrict and Sony Pictures Worldwide Acquisitions -- said they were developing a third "Insidious" movie, written by Leigh Whannell, a screenwriter on the first two "Insidious" films.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 2005 | Robert W. Welkos, Times Staff Writer
Every few years a couple of filmmakers with talent to burn but almost nothing to show for it seem to come from out of nowhere to make a surprise hit movie. Then their film goes to DVD and sales soar even higher. And, also seemingly overnight, a franchise is born. At least that's the way it happened for "Saw," a horror-thriller released last year by Lions Gate Films starring Leigh Whannell, Cary Elwes, Danny Glover and Monica Potter. The film was made on a shoestring budget of $1.
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