Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLeilani Lattin Duke
IN THE NEWS

Leilani Lattin Duke

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1997
I wholeheartedly agree with Tom Plate's Dec. 2 column highlighting Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl's efforts to require a course in fine arts for high school graduation, because an education in the arts develops some of the essential capacities California students need to successfully compete for jobs in the next century. In classrooms across the country, experience has repeatedly demonstrated that when the arts are taught substantively they develop cognitive skills that enable students to see clearly, analyze, reflect, make informed judgments and link information from diverse sources to generate new ideas--in other words, to think conceptually and holistically.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 9, 1997
I wholeheartedly agree with Tom Plate's Dec. 2 column highlighting Assemblywoman Sheila Kuehl's efforts to require a course in fine arts for high school graduation, because an education in the arts develops some of the essential capacities California students need to successfully compete for jobs in the next century. In classrooms across the country, experience has repeatedly demonstrated that when the arts are taught substantively they develop cognitive skills that enable students to see clearly, analyze, reflect, make informed judgments and link information from diverse sources to generate new ideas--in other words, to think conceptually and holistically.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
Is support for the arts literally dying off, as Judith Balfe suggested in her interview (Opinion, Feb. 25)? The answer is yes. Why would we expect otherwise when arts education has been systematically eliminated from school curricula across the nation? As Balfe states, people need to be grounded in the arts before they will become a supportive audience. Yet a grounding in the arts doesn't come from an annual bus trip to a museum or as an automatic consequence of growing up. It requires instruction to develop children's capacities to create art and to expand their powers of perception, analysis and interpretation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1996
Is support for the arts literally dying off, as Judith Balfe suggested in her interview (Opinion, Feb. 25)? The answer is yes. Why would we expect otherwise when arts education has been systematically eliminated from school curricula across the nation? As Balfe states, people need to be grounded in the arts before they will become a supportive audience. Yet a grounding in the arts doesn't come from an annual bus trip to a museum or as an automatic consequence of growing up. It requires instruction to develop children's capacities to create art and to expand their powers of perception, analysis and interpretation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1998
A three-dimensional photo exhibit of urban portraits of Los Angeles is on display at the Central Library. The "Eye Spy L.A." show, sponsored by the Getty Education Institute of the Arts, is the culmination of a project that took 51 middle school students from around the country on tours of Los Angeles to record their impressions on film. " 'Eye Spy L.A.' brought together creative young minds nationwide," said Leilani Lattin Duke, director of the Getty Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1985
The venture of the Getty Center for Education in the Arts into the role that art can and should play in American schools and the promise of the J. Paul Getty Trust to provide "modest grants" to fund curriculum development are particularly welcome at a time of new concern about the quality of education in the United States.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2013 | By Deborah Vankin
On Monday night, the Getty will present its inaugural J. Paul Getty Founder's Award to Harold Williams and Nancy Englander, who have helped lead the J. Paul Getty Trust -- and envision its future -- since 1981. The award will be given out annually to honorees internationally in the areas represented at the Getty -- art, research, conservation, and philanthropy. “It's fitting that the first award should go to the two people who gave intellectual structure and physical form to Mr. Getty's vision,” James Cuno, Getty president and CEO, said in a statement.  “And [two people]
NEWS
January 13, 1995 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prominent educators Thursday called for greater emphasis on the arts in school curricula as one of the most effective ways to teach all subject areas--such as math, geography and history--and to better prepare students for the demands of future jobs. "The arts are the best path to success in the other basics," said Ramon Cortines, chancellor of the New York City school system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1998 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC, TIMES ART WRITER
For the third time since Barry Munitz became president of the J. Paul Getty Trust in January, a top official has resigned. Miguel Angel Corzo on Monday announced his abrupt departure from his job as director of the internationally renowned Getty Conservation Institute, which promotes preservation of the world's cultural heritage. This follows the resignation this summer of Eleanor E.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 6, 1998
Dec. 13-16, 1997 - Official opening days for Getty Center. Dec. 23 - Visitors walking to the Getty Center cause parking congestion, prompting neighbors to complain about cars on residential streets. The L.A. City Council responds by imposing a two-hour temporary parking limit. Dec. 26-27 - One-day attendance peaks at more than 10,000 each day. Jan. 6, 1998 - Barry Munitz assumes his post as president and chief executive officer of the J. Paul Getty Trust, succeeding Harold Williams. Jan.
MAGAZINE
December 7, 1997 | SUZANNE MUCHINC, Suzanne Muchnic is The Times' art writer
Miguel Angel Corzo * "We have a very clearly defined mission, which is to work internationally to create awareness of the importance of the world's cultural heritage and its conservation, for the use and enrichment of present and future generations," says Miguel Angel Corzo, director of the Getty Conservation Institute. "That's it; no five-page statement." But carrying out that mission is complicated.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1987 | JUDITH MICHAELSON, Times Staff Writer
Pointing out that the arts so far have been "primarily the province of a minority" instead of "part of the lives of the majority," National Endowment for the Arts Chairman Frank Hodsoll urged a "broad national coalition to make serious and sequential arts education part of basic education reform." "Our young people deserve to have their eyes, ears and minds opened to civilization . . . they deserve to know about art," Hodsoll said Saturday.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|