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Leimart Park

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1993 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a place where on a recent Friday night, people strolled the streets at midnight without fear. They browsed through cluttered art galleries, shopped for handmade earrings and drank espresso at sidewalk tables while listening to the smoky sounds of jazz. It's the kind of place Los Angeles often dreams of being. But dream no more. With so much of Los Angeles so often dismissed as a wasteland of crack and gangs, the Southwest L.A.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1994 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been a nice pastoral fair in the city, an art exhibition under the shade of Leimert Park, a cultural exchange between the people of Cameroon and the residents of Los Angeles. Americans would learn about art from the central African country on the eve of its soccer team's participation in the World Cup. And more than 100 Cameroonians--artists, performers, business people, and organizers--would learn about the fashions and lifestyles of Angelenos.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 16, 1994 | CARLA HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It should have been a nice pastoral fair in the city, an art exhibition under the shade of Leimert Park, a cultural exchange between the people of Cameroon and the residents of Los Angeles. Americans would learn about art from the central African country on the eve of its soccer team's participation in the World Cup. And more than 100 Cameroonians--artists, performers, business people, and organizers--would learn about the fashions and lifestyles of Angelenos.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 22, 1993 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This is a place where on a recent Friday night, people strolled the streets at midnight without fear. They browsed through cluttered art galleries, shopped for handmade earrings and drank espresso at sidewalk tables while listening to the smoky sounds of jazz. It's the kind of place Los Angeles often dreams of being. But dream no more. With so much of Los Angeles so often dismissed as a wasteland of crack and gangs, the Southwest L.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1991
Woodbury University in Burbank will kick off a four-day celebration of African-American culture at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday with a gospel concert at the Kirby Auditorium featuring the Lake View Terrace Baptist Church's Voices of Praise and the Washington Prep School Choir. General admission is $5; free for Woodbury students. Actress Marla Gibbs, star of the television series "227" and founder of the Crossroads Arts Academy and Theater, will appear Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. in the auditorium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 1999 | NAJEE ALI and EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON, Najee Ali is the executive director of Project Islamic Hope. Earl Ofari Hutchinson is a Los Angeles-based writer
In March, a coalition of community residents, businesspersons and activists in the Crenshaw area launched a campaign to rename a section of Degnan Boulevard to Malcolm X Boulevard. Councilman Mark Ridley-Thomas, whose district takes in Leimart Park, has said the idea has merit. But the big hurdle is getting City Council approval. First a public hearing must be held to determine support for the name change.
BUSINESS
June 3, 1989 | JOHN CHARLES TIGHE, Times Staff Writer
Five schools operated by Irvine-based National Education Corp., the nation's largest for-profit training firm, are among hundreds of post-secondary schools nationwide that face punitive actions if their student loan default rates are not improved. More than a dozen other schools operated by National Education that have lower default rates will be required to develop default-management plans as part of a massive government package of rules and legislative proposals designed to reduce the $1.8 billion in defaulted loans each year.
NEWS
June 27, 2001 | JONATHAN KIRSCH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From his perspective as a longtime editor for Playboy, Stephen Randall is surely an expert on the manners and morals of what he calls "Upper Los Angeles"--"That's Hollywood," explains one of the characters in Randall's first novel, "The Other Side of Mulholland" (St. Martin's Press/L.A. Weekly Books, $23.95, 256 pages), "and all the glitz and the big houses and beautiful women and the BMWs."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 19, 2011 | By Grace Krilanovich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
SUNDAY Ransom Riggs : The author of "Miss Peregrine's Home for Peculiar Children" will sign copies of his debut young-adult novel. Dark Delicacies, 4213 W. Burbank Blvd., Burbank. 2 p.m. Free. (818) 556-6660. Bill Sharpsteen : The author of "The Docks" will discuss and sign his new book about the Port of Los Angeles. Wells Fargo Theater at Autry National Center, 4700 Western Heritage Way, L.A. 2 p.m. Free with museum admission. (323) 667-2000. WordTheatre : Actors Maggie Siff, Amy Brenneman and Jon Tenney will give dramatic readings of stories by Sarah Shun-Lien Bynum, Jane Smiley and Simon Van Booy.
BUSINESS
September 16, 1999 | MARLA DICKERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Inner-city redevelopment may be the hot topic in political and academic circles, but Los Angeles County's black entrepreneurs continue looking elsewhere for economic opportunity, according to a Los Angeles Times Poll. The survey, which included responses from more than 1,400 minority business owners, showed that blacks are more likely than other ethnic minorities in the county to be considering relocating their firms.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1999 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gordon Lewis describes himself and his wife, Claudia, as "sort of Hollywood expatriates." Fed up with the entertainment business, they ditched potentially lucrative careers in the mid-'90s--Gordon as a sitcom writer, Claudia as an executive in script development at a production company--to start over in technology. "Disillusioned doesn't even capture it," Gordon, whose writing credits include work on "Family Matters," "Amen" and "In Living Color," said of their feelings toward Hollywood.
NEWS
March 6, 1992 | GAILE ROBINSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
State Sen. Diane Watson wears a smart business suit edged and color-blocked with authentic African Kente cloth. The bright-colored jacket by L.A. designer Ahneva Ahneva can be a distraction, though. Often, Watson says, her constituents are more intrigued by what she is wearing than by what she saying. "If I don't want to hear, 'Where did you get that?' then I wear something else." In her travels, Watson says she sees more and more women wearing African-influenced fashions.
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