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Leishmaniasis

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NEWS
October 3, 1992
Thank God for Gregory Kingsley (now Russ), who sued to end the parental rights of his birth mother, and to be adopted by his foster family. We now realize that children have rights under the law like the rest of us do. Some 12-year-olds like Gregory know their self-interest better than many adults who would decide for them. Children are naturally reticent to expose an abusive parent, no matter how painful things are.
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NEWS
October 3, 1992
Thank God for Gregory Kingsley (now Russ), who sued to end the parental rights of his birth mother, and to be adopted by his foster family. We now realize that children have rights under the law like the rest of us do. Some 12-year-olds like Gregory know their self-interest better than many adults who would decide for them. Children are naturally reticent to expose an abusive parent, no matter how painful things are.
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NATIONAL
October 24, 2003 | From Reuters
American soldiers returning from Iraq are being told not to give blood for up to one year to prevent the possible spread of a parasite into the U.S. blood supply, federal health officials said Thursday. The precautionary ban was ordered by the Department of Defense and the nation's largest association of blood banks following an outbreak of cutaneous leishmaniasis among U.S. soldiers serving in the Persian Gulf and Afghanistan.
HEALTH
August 13, 2001 | Hartford Courant
As unappetizing as it sounds, fly saliva may turn out to be a cure for a potentially deadly parasitic infection. Federal researchers announced this week that they had prevented mice from developing leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease that can cause flesh-eating infections or fatal infestations of internal organs, by inoculating mice with a component derived from the saliva of a sand fly.
SCIENCE
July 16, 2005 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
Three single-cell parasites responsible for three diseases -- African trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, Chagas disease and leishmaniasis -- share a nearly identical genetic core, according to five related studies published Friday in the journal Science. Investigators were surprised to find such overlap in the genetic maps of the organisms because they diverged from a common ancestor millions of years ago.
NEWS
May 10, 1992 | MICHAEL WOODS, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
The Persian Gulf War flashed yet another warning that international travel can threaten one of the world's most precious commodities: human blood. U.S. military and blood bank officials late last year banned donations from the more than 500,000 Americans who served in the Persian Gulf. Troops there in 1990 and 1991 were exposed to leishmaniasis, a parasitic disease that is spread by the bite of sand flies and may be transmitted in blood.
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Persian Gulf War veterans will be prohibited from donating blood for at least a year in an effort to prevent the spread of a blood-borne organism that so far has sickened 22 soldiers, officials said Tuesday. Officials stressed, however, that the move is precautionary. Dr. William Sherwood, acting senior vice president for biomedical services for the American Red Cross, said that "all indications are that the blood supply is safe from this disease."
NEWS
November 13, 1991 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Persian Gulf War veterans will be prohibited from donating blood for at least a year in an effort to prevent the spread of a blood-borne organism that so far has sickened 22 soldiers, officials said Tuesday. Officials stressed, however, that the move is precautionary. Dr. William Sherwood, acting senior vice president for biomedical services for the American Red Cross, said that "all indications are that the blood supply is safe."
NEWS
March 30, 1993 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES MEDICAL WRITER
Tropical diseases--one of the world's most pressing, and most ignored, public health threats--are spreading rapidly and could kill 4 million people each year by 2010, twice as many lives as they claim now, the World Health Organization announced Monday. In an urgent call for new research, the agency reported that one of every 10 people in the world--a staggering 500 million--suffer from at least one of the eight most common tropical diseases, with malaria alone infecting about 270 million.
WORLD
May 5, 2002 | DAVID ZUCCHINO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Phlebotomus sergenti is a tiny gray sand fly slightly smaller than a mosquito. It feeds on human blood and, when feasting, can transmit parasites called leishmania. One fly bit Mansoor Mimtaza the day he was born. That was 10 months ago, and he still has a weepy red lesion beside his tiny pug nose. A sand fly also bit Mohammed Sarwar, 52, leaving a crusty purple scab along his terribly swollen right wrist.
NEWS
January 19, 1991 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The possibility of contracting infectious diseases is a serious threat to U.S. troops in the Middle East, according to military and Veterans Administration physicians. Many of the 400,000 American troops deployed in the Persian Gulf region are likely to come down with diseases--mostly mundane but some exotic--that are found in the region. With the outbreak of war, the toll from disease will undoubtedly be higher as health precautions take a back seat to the battle, medical authorities say.
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