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ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1996 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Knowledge is invaluable. There's no replacement for it," claims Lemmy, singer-bassist-grisly-figurehead of Motorhead. But, ye fans of this deathless metal band, don't be too concerned that Lemmy's going professorial on you. He might like to include a bit of social comment and world history in his lyrics, but he also likes to say [expletive] a whole lot.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pirate at the end of the bar is absorbed in a game of chance, tapping at a video-game console through virtual dice, cards, puzzles and music trivia between sips of bourbon and Coke. Lemmy Kilmister, the iconic frontman for the hard-rock band Motörhead, feeds more money into the machine. "You win some, you lose some, it's all the same to me," he says with a grin, quoting his own song "Ace of Spades. " This is a favorite pastime for the man in black, spending another afternoon and evening at the Rainbow Bar & Grill, his neighborhood pub on the Sunset Strip.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lemmy, a.k.a. Ian Kilmister, is the man behind Motorhead, the British quartet of whom he once said: "If we moved in next door, your lawn would die." Motorhead--which has just released "March or Die," yet another album of raucous speed metal sure to anger parents the world over--will be in San Juan Capistrano on Monday night to play the Coach House. Because the bad will just be passing through, there's probably no need for horticultural paranoia.
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Mark Olsen
"It's a great job, I recommend it. " So says Lemmy Kilmister on his life as a rock 'n' roller in the film "Lemmy," a documentary portrait of the Motörhead frontman and living symbol of hard rock swagger. It says much of Kilmister's enduring appeal that the slew of celebrity testimonials, including Dave Grohl, Jarvis Cocker, Billy Bob Thornton and Joan Jett, come from such a wide swath of the musical spectrum. Co-directors Greg Olliver and Wes Orshoski cycle through an array of topics with little organization ?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1996 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lemmy doesn't worry a lot about offending anybody's sensibilities. When a record label head once complained that Motorhead offended too many people, Lemmy's response was: " 'What the [expletive] are they doing that I shouldn't offend them? Tell me that! Why do you keep offending me telling me this [expletive]? I'm on your label.' He should have been sticking up for me, but of course that was too much to hope for. Everybody's so scared of everything, afraid of offending this lobby and that lobby."
NEWS
January 20, 2011 | By Mark Olsen
"It's a great job, I recommend it. " So says Lemmy Kilmister on his life as a rock 'n' roller in the film "Lemmy," a documentary portrait of the Motörhead frontman and living symbol of hard rock swagger. It says much of Kilmister's enduring appeal that the slew of celebrity testimonials, including Dave Grohl, Jarvis Cocker, Billy Bob Thornton and Joan Jett, come from such a wide swath of the musical spectrum. Co-directors Greg Olliver and Wes Orshoski cycle through an array of topics with little organization ?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010 | By Mark Sachs, Los Angeles Times
Ah, to be a single-name star, those anointed ones for whom no further identification is necessary. There's Elvis, there's Marilyn, there's Kobe — and then there's Lemmy. Motörhead's indefatigable frontman, Lemmy Kilmister, is being honored for his long and illustrious music career on VH1 Classic's "Revolver Magazine's Golden Gods Award," airing this week, where he'll also perform a killer version of "Ace of Spades" with Lemmy fans Slash and Dave Grohl. He's also working on a new album and beginning a world tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2011 | By Steve Appleford, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The pirate at the end of the bar is absorbed in a game of chance, tapping at a video-game console through virtual dice, cards, puzzles and music trivia between sips of bourbon and Coke. Lemmy Kilmister, the iconic frontman for the hard-rock band Motörhead, feeds more money into the machine. "You win some, you lose some, it's all the same to me," he says with a grin, quoting his own song "Ace of Spades. " This is a favorite pastime for the man in black, spending another afternoon and evening at the Rainbow Bar & Grill, his neighborhood pub on the Sunset Strip.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 2010 | By Mark Sachs, Los Angeles Times
Ah, to be a single-name star, those anointed ones for whom no further identification is necessary. There's Elvis, there's Marilyn, there's Kobe — and then there's Lemmy. Motörhead's indefatigable frontman, Lemmy Kilmister, is being honored for his long and illustrious music career on VH1 Classic's "Revolver Magazine's Golden Gods Award," airing this week, where he'll also perform a killer version of "Ace of Spades" with Lemmy fans Slash and Dave Grohl. He's also working on a new album and beginning a world tour.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1996 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lemmy doesn't worry a lot about offending anybody's sensibilities. When a record label head once complained that Motorhead offended too many people, Lemmy's response was: " 'What the [expletive] are they doing that I shouldn't offend them? Tell me that! Why do you keep offending me telling me this [expletive]? I'm on your label.' He should have been sticking up for me, but of course that was too much to hope for. Everybody's so scared of everything, afraid of offending this lobby and that lobby."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1996 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Knowledge is invaluable. There's no replacement for it," claims Lemmy, singer-bassist-grisly-figurehead of Motorhead. But, ye fans of this deathless metal band, don't be too concerned that Lemmy's going professorial on you. He might like to include a bit of social comment and world history in his lyrics, but he also likes to say [expletive] a whole lot.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1992 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lemmy, a.k.a. Ian Kilmister, is the man behind Motorhead, the British quartet of whom he once said: "If we moved in next door, your lawn would die." Motorhead--which has just released "March or Die," yet another album of raucous speed metal sure to anger parents the world over--will be in San Juan Capistrano on Monday night to play the Coach House. Because the bad will just be passing through, there's probably no need for horticultural paranoia.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1988 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
Lemmy Kilminster has been in Motorhead for nearly 15 years and no one ever offered him a movie part--perhaps producers were scared off by the band's initial slogan: "If we move in next door to you, your lawn will die!" But now you can see him in (count 'em) two films.
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