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FOOD
May 23, 1985 | BEATRICE H. COMAS, The Christian Science Monitor
If you're ambivalent about fresh asparagus, you will probably prepare dishes where it is not the star but the stand-in. You may hide or partially disguise it in a casserole, souffle or quiche. But many people prefer fresh asparagus on its own--boiled or steamed al dente and served simply with a butter-lemon sauce.
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FOOD
March 11, 2009
  Total time: 12 minutes, plus cooking and drying time for the candied ginger and syrup Servings: 2 cocktails Note: Canton Ginger Liqueur and Charbay Vodka can be found at good liqueur stores. The candied ginger recipe yields more powdered candied ginger than is required for the recipe. Store the powder in a sealable plastic bag in a cool, dry place; it should keep for several weeks. The recipe also yields more candied ginger than is needed for the recipe; the syrup will keep, covered and refrigerated, for up to 2 weeks.
FOOD
May 5, 1999
Loquats are chiefly eaten fresh, but the Chinese sometimes stew them with meat and chicken or pickle them. In northern India, where loquats are often called May apples, cooks prepare them in a spiced chutney. In Sicily, loquats are grown in Trabia, near Palermo, where loquat-blossom honey is highly esteemed, and confectioners make marzipan nespole, artfully painted to look blemished like the real thing.
NEWS
June 27, 2013 | By Isabella Alsobrook
A certain member of my family has grumbled about the lack of seafood during my monthlong 100-mile diet. This shortage is in no way related to the restrictive radius -- the Pacific Ocean takes up about a quarter of my range -- but I have been doing the vast majority of the shopping this month and fish is hardly one of my favorite foods. Still, I must pacify my fish-loving family, so I putted up to Ventura for a market selling locally caught fish. Every Saturday, a few fishermen haul in their catch and set up stands behind Andria's Seafood Restaurant and Fish Market in Ventura Harbor Village on Spinnaker Drive.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 13, 2011
Jason Neroni, the chef at the newly renovated and expanded Osteria La Buca , is also a talented mixologist. He recently concocted a truly tasty list of cocktails for the bar, all of which manage to conjure up summer-tinged feelings of sentimentality for Italy (whether you've been there or not). A particular favorite, the Penny Arcade, mixes earthy snap liquor, elegant Benedictine, herbal-edged Amaro Nonino with a sweet kiss of honey and a sour dash of lemon for a snapshot of life on easy street.
TRAVEL
February 21, 2010 | By Susan Spano
The glass case at Maria Grammatico's Pasticceria del Convento in the hilltop town of Erice displays treasures worthy of a Swiss bank. Cannoli, filled with fresh ricotta, is just the best known variety. When you make a closer study, you discover a world of confections as beautiful to look at as they are sweet to eat: green cassata cakes made of almond, sugar, vanilla, buttermilk curd and candied fruit; perfectly formed marzipan prickly pears and tomatoes; lemon-flavored cuscinetti (small fried pastries)
FOOD
May 21, 2008
  Total time: 15 minutes Servings: 4 Note: Adapted from Baccarat Bar, Bellagio Las Vegas. The sweet and sour will keep for 1 week, refrigerated. Sweet and sour 1/4 cup sugar 1/2 cup fresh lemon juice In a small saucepan, stir the sugar with one-fourth cup water over medium heat until the sugar dissolves. Cool. Combine the cooled simple syrup and lemon juice. Makes 1 cup (8 ounces). Cocktail assembly 8 ounces pisco 3 ounces Cointreau liqueur 6 ounces white grape juice 6 ounces sweet and sour 3 ounces California Pinot Noir 4 slices lemon 3 grapes In a large pitcher filled with ice, add the pisco, Cointreau, grape juice and sweet and sour and stir to combine.
WORLD
May 29, 2010 | By Edmund Sanders, Los Angeles Times
If Willy Wonka had a farm, it would fit right in here in Israel. Want a lemon-scented tomato or a chocolate-colored persimmon? How about some miniaturized garlic cloves for the home chef who doesn't have time to chop, or a purple potato that tastes buttery when cooked? There are no chocolate rivers or edible teacup flowers on Israeli farms, but you will find carrots shaped like potatoes, strawberries shaped like carrots, star-shaped zucchini and "watermelon" tomatoes — dark green on the outside with a juicy red flesh.
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