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FOOD
May 23, 1985 | BEATRICE H. COMAS, The Christian Science Monitor
If you're ambivalent about fresh asparagus, you will probably prepare dishes where it is not the star but the stand-in. You may hide or partially disguise it in a casserole, souffle or quiche. But many people prefer fresh asparagus on its own--boiled or steamed al dente and served simply with a butter-lemon sauce.
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FOOD
December 23, 2010 | By Noelle Carter, Los Angeles Times
  Dear SOS: The lemon pasta at Angelini Osteria on Beverly Boulevard seems remarkably simple. My attempts at re-creating it have been remarkably underwhelming. Can you get the exact measurements and ingredients for this memorable comfort dish? The restaurant describes it as "Tagliolini al Limone with Lemon, Cream, Parmigiano-Reggiano and Basil. " However, there is obviously a specific method as to how the kitchen gets it to come out so balanced and tasteful. Thank you. Janie Orenstein Pacific Palisades Dear Janie: We loved the wonderful simplicity to this dish: Fresh basil and a touch of lemon are infused with a little heavy cream, which is cooked down just until it thickens, and is poured over pasta.
FOOD
February 23, 2013 | By David Karp
The Irvine Saturday farmers market is the largest and best in Orange County, but it's a mixed bag. It has some worthy local small farmers who come in person, along with more commercial farms, and even a few who have been sanctioned previously for cheating by agricultural authorities or other managers. Orange County Produce, owned by the family of the previous California agriculture secretary, A.G. Kawamura, farms on remnants of undeveloped local land, a bittersweet reminder of the county's past agricultural glory.
FOOD
February 4, 2010
  Lentil chili with merguez Total time: 1 hour, 20 minutes Servings: Makes 16 to 20 (1-cup) servings Note: Merguez sausage can generally be found at gourmet and cooking supply stores. Harissa can generally be found at gourmet and cooking supply stores, as well as select well-stocked supermarkets. 3 tablespoons olive oil 1 large onion, thinly sliced lengthwise 2 teaspoons chopped ginger 1 teaspoon chopped garlic Zest of 2 lemons 2 sticks cinnamon 4 teaspoons cumin 4 teaspoons smoked paprika 1 tablespoon turmeric 1 teaspoon cardamom 1/4 cup tomato paste Juice of 1 lemon, more to taste 3 (14.5-ounce)
TRAVEL
February 21, 2010 | By Susan Spano
The glass case at Maria Grammatico's Pasticceria del Convento in the hilltop town of Erice displays treasures worthy of a Swiss bank. Cannoli, filled with fresh ricotta, is just the best known variety. When you make a closer study, you discover a world of confections as beautiful to look at as they are sweet to eat: green cassata cakes made of almond, sugar, vanilla, buttermilk curd and candied fruit; perfectly formed marzipan prickly pears and tomatoes; lemon-flavored cuscinetti (small fried pastries)
FOOD
December 31, 2008
  Total time: 10 minutes, plus freezing time for the decorative block of ice Servings: 10 Note: From Julie Reiner of Clover Club. To prepare ice that has been frozen with raspberries and blackberries: Fill a container that fits in your punch bowl with hot water. Add raspberries and blackberries for decoration and freeze. 1 lemon 1 sugar cube 2 tablespoons cassis 2 tablespoons St-Germain elderflower liqueur 1 large block of ice (see note above) 1 (750 ml)
FOOD
December 9, 2010
  Kale Caesar Total time: 30 minutes Servings: 4 to 6 Note: Adapted from "Tartine Bread" by Chad Robertson. Caesar dressing 2 lemons 3 cloves garlic 6 olive oil-packed anchovy fillets 1 egg yolk Salt 2 cups olive oil To make the dressing, grate the zest from 1 lemon. Cut both lemons in half. Place the garlic, anchovies and lemon zest in a mortar and pound with a pestle to make a thick paste.
NEWS
December 5, 2012 | By Noelle Carter
When shopping for citrus, choose fruit that are heavy for their size -- they'll be the juiciest. And look for fruit with nice, tight skins. Avoid fruit that are wrinkled or spotted, or feel lightweight. You can generally tell the ripeness of the fruit by the thickness of the rind -- the thinner the rind, the more ripe and juicy. Most citrus will keep for several days at room temperature. They'll also keep well in the refrigerator, stored in the crisper for up to several weeks. Thin-skinned citrus such as mandarins or tangerines should be refrigerated right away.
FOOD
November 25, 2010 | By Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
It's easy enough to freehand your way into a decent bottle of limoncello . All you need is a generous handful of lemon zest, a neutral spirit, some sugar and a couple of days of infusing patience. But to Ventura Limoncello's co-owner James Carling, decent is hardly the same as delizioso , at least in the eyes of his Italian in-laws. "You have to watch each lemon, step by step," says his mother-in-law, Rossana Zaretti, in Italian-soaked English as she runs a citrus peeler from the top to the bottom of a locally grown Eureka lemon.
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