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ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Most people know him as the Minister for Silly Walks on "Monty Python" or as Q in James Bond films. But John Cleese will also go down in history for another reason: lemurs. Researchers from the University of Zurich in Switzerland have named a newly discovered species of lemur -- one of the most primitive and endangered primates in the world -- after the British comedian in honor of his work with the animal.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | Susan King
Who knew lemurs were zen masters? The primates, whose ancestors came to Madagascar some 60 million years ago, love to play. They also enjoy a good siesta on a handy branch, and when they are happy, they emit a cute little noise akin to a piglet's snort. They also take press junkets in stride. Last week at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, Felix, a 10-year-old ring-tailed lemur, and Taj, a 7-year-old brown lemur, were chilling with their handlers, demonstrating a "don't worry, be happy" attitude as cameras flashed all around.
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SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Lemurs may not be the most academically gifted of the primate family, but don't turn your back on these sly critters. Those in larger social groups are smarter thieves, new research has found. Just as city kids have a reputation for developing street smarts to survive, lemurs in larger groups develop some serious social savvy. The findings, published in PLoS ONE, provide a window into the development of social intelligence --  and general intelligence -- in primates, which include humans.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | Martin Tsai
Imax 3-D documentary "Island of Lemurs: Madagascar" shines a spotlight on one of the earliest primates that coexisted with dinosaurs more than 60 million years ago. Although extinct in their native Africa, hundreds of lemur species have adopted Madagascar as home. But these wandering spirits are hardly thriving, as 90% of the forest has been torched since humans set foot on the island some two millennia ago. The film highlights the few species taking refuge in the Ranomafana National Park and the preservation efforts shepherded by Patricia C. Wright, anthropology professor at Stony Brook University in New York.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2014 | Susan King
Who knew lemurs were zen masters? The primates, whose ancestors came to Madagascar some 60 million years ago, love to play. They also enjoy a good siesta on a handy branch, and when they are happy, they emit a cute little noise akin to a piglet's snort. They also take press junkets in stride. Last week at the Ritz-Carlton Hotel in downtown Los Angeles, Felix, a 10-year-old ring-tailed lemur, and Taj, a 7-year-old brown lemur, were chilling with their handlers, demonstrating a "don't worry, be happy" attitude as cameras flashed all around.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Not so long ago, the cute and curious ring-tailed lemurs of southwestern Madagascar had scientists stumped. Each morning, for about a week, the scientists would arrive in a forest they knew to be populated by ring-tailed lemurs to find the small primates seeming to materialize out of nowhere. Then the scientists would watch as the lemurs went about their business -- wrapping their arms and tails around each other to form a "lemur ball" for warmth, and then going out to eat baby birds, insects or whatever they could find.
NEWS
January 20, 1988 | From Times Wire Services and
A previously unknown primate, the golden bamboo lemur, has been discovered on the Indian Ocean island of Madagascar by zoologist Bernhard Meier of Bochum University. He said Tuesday that the shy animal, which looks like a cross between a squirrel and a monkey, is about 30 inches long and weighs about 2 1/2 pounds. It has been recognized by Folia Primatologica, the authoritative international journal of primatology, and given the scientific name hapalemus aureus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1990 | From staff and wire reports
A field biologist who trudged through a soggy, leech-infested forest in search of a long-lost relative of humans and apes returned with malaria, blood poisoning and the first photographs of an animal no scientist had ever seen alive. The sighting of the hairy-eared dwarf lemur in Madagascar was made by Bernhard Meier of Ruhr University in Bochum, West Germany, and has been described as one of the most important rediscoveries of a mammal in the last decade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1998 | HOPE HAMASHIGE
The Santa Ana Zoo has sent its first animal to participate in the Assn. of Zoos and Aquariums Species Survival Plan, which aims to prevent animal extinction. Spot, a 4-year-old black-and-white ruffed lemur, has been sent to Duke University's Primate Center, where she will be introduced to a male lemur from Dickerson Park Zoo in Springfield, Mo. The hope is that the two zoo-raised primates will mate and produce offspring. If they do, the entire clan will be released into the wild in Madagascar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1997
Three rare blue-eyed lemurs, among the most primitive of all living primates, made their debut Wednesday in their new habitat at the Los Angeles Zoo. The nocturnal lemurs live mainly in trees and are found chiefly on the island of Madagascar, off the east coast of southern Africa. Lemurs have a body that looks like a monkey's and a face like a cat's, mammal curator Bob Barnes said. "There are about 65 blue-eyed lemurs in zoos worldwide," he said.
SCIENCE
December 4, 2013 | By Deborah Netburn
Not so long ago, the cute and curious ring-tailed lemurs of southwestern Madagascar had scientists stumped. Each morning, for about a week, the scientists would arrive in a forest they knew to be populated by ring-tailed lemurs to find the small primates seeming to materialize out of nowhere. Then the scientists would watch as the lemurs went about their business -- wrapping their arms and tails around each other to form a "lemur ball" for warmth, and then going out to eat baby birds, insects or whatever they could find.
SCIENCE
September 4, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan
A lemur that hibernates is strange and cute enough. But studying its lethargic state may provide a clue to sending humans on long-distance space travel or healing the ravages of heart attacks, stroke and head trauma, according to researchers at Duke University. The western fat-tailed dwarf lemur, a pocket-sized nocturnal primate native to Madagascar, is the closest genetic cousin of humans to hibernate for long periods, a discovery made by a German research team in 2004. The revelation that primates hibernated led to a happy coincidence at Duke, which happens to have a lemur center and a sleep laboratory.
SCIENCE
June 28, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Lemurs may not be the most academically gifted of the primate family, but don't turn your back on these sly critters. Those in larger social groups are smarter thieves, new research has found. Just as city kids have a reputation for developing street smarts to survive, lemurs in larger groups develop some serious social savvy. The findings, published in PLoS ONE, provide a window into the development of social intelligence --  and general intelligence -- in primates, which include humans.
WORLD
November 23, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
She was the spy who was undone by a furry little creature with huge, hypnotic eyes. It was the early 1980s, and a young Madagascan scientist named Hanta Rasamimanana had been dispatched by her pro-Soviet government to spy on a group of Americans working in the private Berenty Reserve in the southern part of the country. Instead of finding out what the Americans were really up to, she fell in love with the creatures they were studying: lemurs. Rasamimanana remembers how, on her first mission as a researcher-cum-spy, she paid more attention to American primatologist Alison Jolly and her comments about the primates than to her bosses' orders.
WORLD
November 21, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
Foreigners have come to Anjandobo village, a cluster of wooden huts on the desolate red dust of southern Madagascar. They're vaza -- outsiders. The vaza are sweating. They wear hats and carry cameras and plastic bottles of water. The sun exhausts the vaza : four journalists and a group of aid workers from UNICEF and the World Food Program. Scorpions bristle under rocks. There's little shade. A small Anjandobo child watches the vaza with their water bottles.
NEWS
January 29, 2006 | Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun
Since daybreak he has been scanning the treetops for the creatures that move as if by pogo stick and look as if they wear white fur coats and face masks. It is after 2 p.m. and the dense, hilly rain forest has yet to give primatologist Erik Patel a glimpse of Propithecus candidus, the rare monkey-like lemur known as the silky sifaka. It is one of the world's 25 most endangered primates. Fewer than 1,000 silky sifakas are thought to exist, all of them in this rugged patch of Madagascar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1997 | JEFF KASS
A pair of lemurs--commonly mistaken for skunks but actually relatives of monkeys--have given birth to two babies as part of a Santa Ana Zoo protection program for endangered species. With the births of Camille and Grace, the zoo now has six black-and-white ruffed lemurs. About 5,000 lemurs remain in their natural habitat, the island of Madagascar off the African coast. Another 500 live in zoos worldwide, zookeeper Michelle Claud said.
WORLD
November 23, 2009 | By Robyn Dixon
She was the spy who was undone by a furry little creature with huge, hypnotic eyes. It was the early 1980s, and a young Madagascan scientist named Hanta Rasamimanana had been dispatched by her pro-Soviet government to spy on a group of Americans working in the private Berenty Reserve in the southern part of the country. Instead of finding out what the Americans were really up to, she fell in love with the creatures they were studying: lemurs. Rasamimanana remembers how, on her first mission as a researcher-cum-spy, she paid more attention to American primatologist Alison Jolly and her comments about the primates than to her bosses' orders.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 12, 2005 | From Associated Press
Most people know him as the Minister for Silly Walks on "Monty Python" or as Q in James Bond films. But John Cleese will also go down in history for another reason: lemurs. Researchers from the University of Zurich in Switzerland have named a newly discovered species of lemur -- one of the most primitive and endangered primates in the world -- after the British comedian in honor of his work with the animal.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 2005 | Mark Olsen
Andy RICHTER speaks in many voices. Even in the span of a brief conversation, among those he mimics and affectionately mocks are his wife, his 4-year-old son, his manager and assorted other showbiz types (including Regis Philbin and Michael Caine). Then there is Mort, the lovable, plushy little lemur Richter gives voice to in the new animated film "Madagascar," alongside the voice work of Ben Stiller, Jada Pinkett Smith, David Schwimmer and Chris Rock.
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