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Lena Horne

ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1996 | DON HECKMAN
"My life has been about surviving," Lena Horne says. "Along the way I also became an artist." She is precisely right about that. At 79, Horne is not only a survivor with incredible presence and a well-tuned sense of self, she also continues to be a gifted and articulate performer. Her thoughtful commentary is a key element in "Lena Horne: In Her Own Voice," the first installment in the 11th season of PBS' "American Masters" biography series. "It's been an interesting journey," she adds.
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NEWS
November 24, 1996 | STEVEN LINAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sunday "Nova" / 8 p.m. KCET. Continues through Tuesday 8 p.m. Mon.-Wed. KOCE Lennart Nilsson, the Swedish photojournalist who chronicled the creation of a human being in fascinating detail on "Miracle of Life," picks up where he left off on that 1983 PBS documentary. In this ambitious three-part report, he covers the vast diversity of life on Earth. The series opens with a look at similarities in the embryonic stages of humans and animals.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 1996 | ROBERT HILBURN
Even if you don't know Horne's history, this is an engaging collection of wonderfully stylish movie vocals. Among the 23 numbers performed by the elegant singer: Harold Arlen-E.Y. "Yip" Harburg's witty "Ain't It the Truth" (which was recorded for, but not used in, 1943's "Cabin in the Sky") and Johnny S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 1994
A concert by Lena Horne, a new children's series from Nickelodeon and a special for men about prostate health highlight the viewing options this weekend. "An Evening With Lena Horne," taped last September at the Supper Club in Manhattan, features tunes from her most recent CD and old favorites such as "The Lady Is a Tramp" and "Just One of Those Things." The program will be shown at 5 and 9 p.m. Sunday on A&E.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 1994 | LEONARD FEATHER
Horne again, born again--as a result of her triumphant concert last year celebrating Billy Strayhorn, which triggered this belated return to records. There are five Strayhorn works here, two by Duke Ellington, and the rest by a judicious assortment of songsmiths. Her sound has changed little over the decades; the diction and the vibrato are utterly her own. Her backers are mainly a jazz-oriented group, including Houston Person on tenor sax and Toots Thielemans on harmonica.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1994 | GENE SEYMOUR, NEWSDAY
So here was Lena Horne backstage at Avery Fisher Hall June 20, ready to face her first audience in several years. Two weeks of rehearsal was her only preparation. Yet, as she later recalled, she wasn't scared. Yet. " It'll be all right, " she thought. " Billy's with me. " Billy Strayhorn, after all, was the reason she was there in the first place. The concert was the JVC Jazz Festival's tribute to Duke Ellington's late collaborator, arranger and composer of "Take the A Train."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 1993 | LEONARD FEATHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The annual JVC Jazz Festival, which opened Friday, is suffering attendance problems. The intimate afternoon recitals have been dropped. Even Town Hall was not filled Saturday for a strong concert headed by Anita O'Day. The trouble, explains producer George Wein, is the shortage of new blockbuster names. More and more there seems to be a reliance on both artists over 50 and tributes to deceased musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 20, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
Gail Lumet Buckley's embarkation on the story of "The Hornes: An American Family" began when her grandfather died and her mother, singer Lena Horne, asked her to put his trunk in storage in a basement. Opening it, she found an astonishing trove of photographs, letters, clippings, an 1884 letter from Benjamin Harrison, a 1910 Tammany election ballot. "I started putting everything in chronological order," Buckley, 48, said the other day.
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