Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsLena Olin
IN THE NEWS

Lena Olin

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | Steve Hochman
For Lena Olin, playing with Gabriel Byrne as Claire Danes' parents in writer-director Theresa Connelly's "Polish Wedding" is the latest in a career of rich characters, including her Oscar-nomiated role in 1989's "Enemies, a Love Story." The actress, 43, lives in New York with her husband, director Lasse Hallstrom ("What's Eating Gilbert Grape"), a son, 11, and daughter, 3. Next up: Roman Polanski's "The Ninth Gate."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | Steve Hochman
For Lena Olin, playing with Gabriel Byrne as Claire Danes' parents in writer-director Theresa Connelly's "Polish Wedding" is the latest in a career of rich characters, including her Oscar-nomiated role in 1989's "Enemies, a Love Story." The actress, 43, lives in New York with her husband, director Lasse Hallstrom ("What's Eating Gilbert Grape"), a son, 11, and daughter, 3. Next up: Roman Polanski's "The Ninth Gate."
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Romeo Is Bleeding" (citywide) is choked with stylishness. It's a film noir for people who think the genre exists in order to overdose the audience on brittle-poetic dialogue, Edward Hopper-ish shadowscapes and artfully framed corpses. But it's not really a traditional noir in the manner of, say, "Double Indemnity" or "Kiss Me Deadly." Its fanciness gives it away. The disjointed, self-conscious, over-the-top stylistics are supposed to make it seem avant-garde but mostly it's just annoying.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1994 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Romeo Is Bleeding" (citywide) is choked with stylishness. It's a film noir for people who think the genre exists in order to overdose the audience on brittle-poetic dialogue, Edward Hopper-ish shadowscapes and artfully framed corpses. But it's not really a traditional noir in the manner of, say, "Double Indemnity" or "Kiss Me Deadly." Its fanciness gives it away. The disjointed, self-conscious, over-the-top stylistics are supposed to make it seem avant-garde but mostly it's just annoying.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | HOWARD KURTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
Lena Olin undergoes a sudden transformation when she is in the camera's eye. After a relaxed chat on a sofa at the Ritz, the 34-year-old actress stretches out her supple body and runs a hand through her thick brown hair as a photographer clicks away. Her milk chocolate eyes deepen with a look of smoldering intensity, her smile teases with a hint of naughtiness. The woman exudes sexuality. It isn't hard to understand why the local tabloids are calling her the "Swedish bombshell."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer.
Lena Olin must have already got wind of the sour word of mouth drifting ahead of "Mr. Jones" when she slipped behind a corner table of the Four Seasons Hotel restaurant for lunch. The Stockholm-based actress has occasionally been critical of Hollywood and the gaudy ostentation in which most of its more successful practitioners live, but this time she was in junket mode, which means one is impeccably polite, impeccably well groomed, and obeys the Western dictum where never is heard a discouraging word--except to say, "I don't do this circus when I'm not working.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1990 | BOB THOMAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When two actors in the same movie are nominated for Academy Awards, the common belief is that they will cancel each other out. But it doesn't always happen. Sometimes, one wins. F. Murray Abraham won as best actor for "Amadeus" in 1984, although Tom Hulce was nominated for the same film.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
Two cops who don't like each other much try to solve a murder. Meanwhile, they also have to keep up their second gigs: One's a yoga instructor and actor, the other a security guard. Guess which is which. * Action comedy (June 13) Columbia With: Harrison Ford, Josh Hartnett, Lena Olin, Bruce Greenwood. The idea: Mismatched cops, each with second jobs, tackle a high-profile murder. Writers: Robert Souza & Ron Shelton. Director: Ron Shelton.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 22, 1988 | MICHAEL WILMINGTON
'A Matter of Life and Death' Sweden, 1987, 89 minutes , 5:30 p.m . In this Swedish maternity ward, the subject--a baby-hating female reporter's adulterous affair with an obstetrician--almost seems to approach high comedy. Marianne Ahrne's film fascinates largely through performance. Lena Olin, as the reporter, holds the screen with as much warmth and grace as any Swedish film actress since the young Ingrid Bergman.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Lena Olin of the new film "Havana" says love scenes can be tricky, but Robert Redford was a charm. "He was sweet," Olin, 35, said in the Dec. 17 issue of People. The Swedish-born actress plays a political activist who has a love affair with a gambler played by Redford in the movie, set during the Cuban revolution. "Actually those scenes were saved until we had shot for quite a while because usually it's good that you get some kind of intimacy with the person," she said.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1993 | LAWRENCE CHRISTON, Lawrence Christon is a Times staff writer.
Lena Olin must have already got wind of the sour word of mouth drifting ahead of "Mr. Jones" when she slipped behind a corner table of the Four Seasons Hotel restaurant for lunch. The Stockholm-based actress has occasionally been critical of Hollywood and the gaudy ostentation in which most of its more successful practitioners live, but this time she was in junket mode, which means one is impeccably polite, impeccably well groomed, and obeys the Western dictum where never is heard a discouraging word--except to say, "I don't do this circus when I'm not working.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 1990 | BOB THOMAS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
When two actors in the same movie are nominated for Academy Awards, the common belief is that they will cancel each other out. But it doesn't always happen. Sometimes, one wins. F. Murray Abraham won as best actor for "Amadeus" in 1984, although Tom Hulce was nominated for the same film.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 19, 1990 | HOWARD KURTZ, THE WASHINGTON POST
Lena Olin undergoes a sudden transformation when she is in the camera's eye. After a relaxed chat on a sofa at the Ritz, the 34-year-old actress stretches out her supple body and runs a hand through her thick brown hair as a photographer clicks away. Her milk chocolate eyes deepen with a look of smoldering intensity, her smile teases with a hint of naughtiness. The woman exudes sexuality. It isn't hard to understand why the local tabloids are calling her the "Swedish bombshell."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 1990 | David J. Fox \f7
Raul Julia has a sizable supporting role in "Havana," but you'd never know it from the on-screen credits--his name isn't there. Ditto for Oscar-winning actor F. Murray Abraham ("Amadeus"), who opted for anonymity for his work in "The Bonfire of the Vanities." Is modesty sweeping Hollywood? Not exactly. "Our usual above-the-title credit wasn't available," explains Julia's agent, Jeff Hunter, referring to the fact that stars Robert Redford and Lena Olin had already secured top billing.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1990 | TERRY ATKINSON
THIS WEEK'S MOVIES Ready for some classy films as a relief from all this summer's hard-action pictures? Just head for your video store. There you'll find two movies which go for more emotional responses than the usual quick thrill, nasty scare and cheap laugh. "Driving Miss Daisy" (Warner, $92.95, PG) won four 1989 Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Actress (Jessica Tandy).
Los Angeles Times Articles
|