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Leningrad

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 6, 1990
While I think it's very nice of Mayor Bradley to want to help Leningrad . . . I couldn't help wondering what exactly does that do for us? JANIS BERMAN, Sherman Oaks
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WORLD
May 23, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
Vladimir Putin emerged from the obscurity of a secret agent's life when called to Moscow in 1997 by power-hungry oligarchs in search of a pliable accomplice to plant in the Kremlin.  In little more than two years, Putin was president of Russia and embarked on a mission to tame the wealthy cabal that hired him and to reinvigorate the debilitated nation. At once aloof and ubiquitous, Putin has turned an inscrutable face to fellow Russians and to the outside world. He appears cold and calculating, indifferent to contrary opinions of political opponents at home or abroad.
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NEWS
June 23, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Eagle, the U.S. Coast Guard's three-masted training ship, sailed into Leningrad on Thursday, bringing 300 American sailors to the former imperial Russian capital on a good-will visit. The Eagle has a crew of 55 and 250 Coast Guard Academy cadets--would-be officers learning their seamanship skills on an annual summer training cruise.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2011 | By Dennis Lim, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Paradoxes abound in the films of the Finnish director Aki Kaurismaki, a master of the tragicomic. His funniest jokes tend to be the most painful ones. Seldom wavering from a lugubrious deadpan and populated with sad sacks who seem incapable of cracking a smile or shedding a tear, his films can achieve the emotional force of classic melodrama. Fables of a sort, they remain grounded in a tangible social reality. Even at their saddest and most despairing, they contain glimmers of hope. In his mid-50s and a festival favorite since the '80s, Kaurismaki has joined the ranks of the master auteurs — his latest, "Le Havre," set to open this week, was perhaps the most warmly received film at Cannes this year — but in the U.S. at least, he has remained somewhat overlooked.
NEWS
June 2, 1989 | From Reuters
The new Soviet Parliament was stunned today when a deputy suggested that Lenin's body be removed from Red Square and buried in Leningrad. Yuri Karyakin said the founder of the Soviet state, whose body is on display in a mausoleum in the square, had expressed the wish to be buried alongside his mother in Leningrad. "We have violated his political will and his last wish as a human being," said Karyakin, a writer. "Tanks drive through Red Square, shaking the body. If I believed in God or the existence of the immortal soul, I would be sure he would thank us."
NEWS
November 13, 1990 | From Associated Press
Leningrad's reformist mayor urged the City Council today to ration eggs, flour, meat and other necessities, saying it is the only way the city will get through the winter without hunger and unrest. "The entire country is introducing ration cards, and we unfortunately cannot avoid it either," Mayor Anatoly Sobchak said. Soviet television showed shoppers in Leningrad, the country's second-largest city, waiting in 500-yard-long lines for such ordinary items as butter, milk and chocolate.
NEWS
June 24, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Tony Aliengena, 11, landed in Leningrad on Friday in his around-the-world flight to the greetings of schoolchildren who crowded around to give him flowers and welcome him to the "land of the Soviets." "The flight was short and easy, and it's great to be here," the boy from San Juan Capistrano said as he stepped out of his Cessna 210 Centurion after the hour and 40 minute flight from Helsinki, Finland. Tanya Barabash, also 11, gave Tony a loaf of brown bread and a cup of salt--the traditional Russian welcome--and then recited a poem in Russian that she had written.
TRAVEL
September 8, 1985 | STAN DELAPLANE, Delaplane is a San Francisco Chronicle columnist
It's cold and wet in Leningrad. We're at the Hotel Pribaltiyskaya on the Gulf of Finland. There's a steady drizzle but no wind. Suddenly, a gale comes off the gulf, strong enough to blow you to Moscow. Sunset never comes. It gets darkest about 1:30 in the morning. There is always a silver glow in the northern sky. The hotel is Leningrad's newest and biggest, with 1,200 rooms, four bars, four restaurants, a nightclub, a bowling alley and a gymnasium. On each floor is a coffee shop open till 2 a.
NEWS
June 23, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, Times Staff Writer
Eleven-year-old Tony Aliengena, reaching a milestone in his "friendship flight" around the world, landed in Leningrad today where he was greeted by a group of schoolchildren who crowded around to give him flowers and welcome him to the "land of the Soviets." "The flight was short and easy, and it's great to be here," the boy from San Juan Capistrano said as he stepped out of his Cessna 210 Centurion after the hour-and-40-minute flight from Helsinki, Finland. Eleven-year-old Tanya Barabash gave Tony a brown loaf of bread and a cup of salt--the traditional Russian welcome--and then recited a poem in Russian that she had written herself.
BOOKS
June 21, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
Susan Sontag, in "On Photography," has called photographs "inexhaustible invitations to deduction, speculation, and fantasy." So it is with Mikhail Lemkhin's photo-poem, "Joseph Brodsky / Leningrad: Fragments," a book that invites as much speculation and fantasy toward Brodsky as toward Leningrad itself. Forced into exile, Brodsky wrote about the city of his birth in his essay "Less Than One." "In the national experience, the city is definitely Leningrad; in the growing vulgarity of its content, it becomes Leningrad more and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2004 | Chris Pasles, Times Staff Writer
Shostakovich's "Leningrad" Symphony -- the powerful single work on the Los Angeles Philharmonic concerts over the weekend -- comes with lots of extraneous weight. Composed largely (the first three movements) during the Nazi siege of that city, the symphony was first hailed in the West as an expression of stirring defiance from a worthy ally. After the Cold War set in, it began to be regarded as a piece of Soviet bombast and claptrap, and the composer as a mouthpiece for a repressive regime.
BOOKS
June 21, 1998 | JONATHAN LEVI, Jonathan Levi is a contributing writer to Book Review
Susan Sontag, in "On Photography," has called photographs "inexhaustible invitations to deduction, speculation, and fantasy." So it is with Mikhail Lemkhin's photo-poem, "Joseph Brodsky / Leningrad: Fragments," a book that invites as much speculation and fantasy toward Brodsky as toward Leningrad itself. Forced into exile, Brodsky wrote about the city of his birth in his essay "Less Than One." "In the national experience, the city is definitely Leningrad; in the growing vulgarity of its content, it becomes Leningrad more and more.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1995 | Barbara Isenberg, Barbara Isenberg is a longtime contributor to Calendar.
When Mark Wigglesworth travels to new orchestras as a guest conductor, he has little interest in conducting familiar music. It's "just basic cowardice on my part," admits the 30-year-old musician. "I'm young and inexperienced in certain music, and the orchestra and audience have memories of their definitive performances." But it's more than that, Wigglesworth continues. He has even withdrawn from concerts, he says, because he didn't feel "justified" in playing some pieces of music.
NEWS
January 27, 1994 | MATT BIVENS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
First they burned the kitchen shelves, then the kitchen table. They burned the wardrobe, and it kept them warm for 22 days. Finally Alexandra Dyen and her son, Vladimir, had nothing left but the family library. "I burned the German classics, and after that it was Shakespeare," Vladimir remembered. "I also burned Pushkin. I don't remember whose edition it was, I think the Marks edition in blue and gold.
NEWS
November 5, 1993 | T.H. McCULLOH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; T. H. McCulloh writes regularly about theater for The Times
During wartime, there is an existential sense of urgency that makes the heart beat faster. Fall in love before it's too late, that beat seems to spell out in its own code. It's the same no matter what side you're on. That sort of longing is the frame in which Russian playwright Aleksei Arbuzov built his hit play "My Poor Marat," which ran for 1,636 performances in Russia.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 1992 | MARK CHALON SMITH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's curious that Aki Kaurismaki's "Leningrad Cowboys Go America" (1990) would be picked as part of the Festival of Arts' "Windows Onto an American Landscape" series because the movie really has so little to do with this country. The band of Russian musicians who travel across the United States in this tall tale/road movie aren't at all interested in America.
NEWS
March 19, 1992 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vladislav Sukhorukov is no stranger to anyone who has paid attention to art in Ventura County in the past year. The Russian artist's work, often surreal and yet pointedly political and/or religious in message, keeps popping up in all the right places. In July, a one-man show of his work went up at the Momentum Gallery.
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