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Leningrad Dixieland Band

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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Leningrad Dixieland Band first toured the United States two years ago, playing a glad-notes variation on glasnost in the form of such ancient folk melodies as "Maple Leaf Rag" and "The Memphis Blues." The nine-man group is back again for a six-week tour that began in British Columbia and centers on appearances at the annual monster rally of traditional music, the Dixieland Jazz Jubilee in Sacramento over Memorial Day weekend. The tour will end in Washington on June 17. Tuesday night, in town for a Wednesday taping of the Johnny Carson show (they appeared on the program with great success in 1987)
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 25, 1989 | CHARLES CHAMPLIN, Times Arts Editor
The Leningrad Dixieland Band first toured the United States two years ago, playing a glad-notes variation on glasnost in the form of such ancient folk melodies as "Maple Leaf Rag" and "The Memphis Blues." The nine-man group is back again for a six-week tour that began in British Columbia and centers on appearances at the annual monster rally of traditional music, the Dixieland Jazz Jubilee in Sacramento over Memorial Day weekend. The tour will end in Washington on June 17. Tuesday night, in town for a Wednesday taping of the Johnny Carson show (they appeared on the program with great success in 1987)
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NEWS
March 15, 1987
A jazz band from Leningrad is the first Soviet entry ever in the annual Sacramento Dixieland Jubilee on Memorial Day weekend, organizers announced. "We have proved again today that there is no cold war in jazz," said Bill Borcher, founder of the 14-year-old event. He said the Leningrad Dixieland Band, among the oldest jazz groups in the Soviet Union, has toured Scandinavia, Eastern Europe and various Western European cities. It is one of 15 foreign bands expected at the festival. About 80 U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1986 | LEONARD FEATHER
We will remember 1986 as the year when Billie Holiday became a star on Hollywood Boulevard. When Duke Ellington became a 22-cent stamp. When Miles Davis became 60, and the Woody Herman Herd turned 50. When Weather Report became Weather Update. When New Age became a separate category, no longer confused with jazz. When compact discs became the new medium for listening to music.
NEWS
July 20, 1987 | TAMARA JONES, Times Staff Writer
The big 100th anniversary party for the world's pea and lentil capital was threatening to fizzle. The Folklore Society was hard-pressed to find people to square-dance on Main Street, and the Liar's Contest had been scrapped because no one had entered. Just when it looked like the centennial highlight would be a helicopter dropping 5,000 Ping-Pong balls over the shopping mall, glasnost came to the Moscow, Ida., centennial. Mikhail S.
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