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Lennie Niehaus

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1990 | Leonard Feather
Niehaus, the respected movie music writer who first gained a name as a jazzman, took his alto sax out of mothballs for this, his first blowing date since the '50s. Of his seven originals, three were heard briefly in his score for Clint Eastwood's "Bird." Teamed with Bill Perkins on various saxes, Niehaus offers good, healthy, updated bebop, with a few arranging touches that avoid the rut of convention. Fine piano, too, by Frank Strazzeri.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005
As I read Susan King's article about Clint Eastwood's affinity for using previous collaborators ["Old Pros Backing Up the Old Pro," Feb. 27], I kept waiting for the name of Lennie Niehaus to come up and it never did. Going back as far as "Pale Rider," Niehaus has either composed or directed the music for many of Eastwood's movies. Though the music for the last two ("Mystic River" and "Million Dollar Baby") was written by Eastwood, it was still directed by Niehaus, whose music goes all the way back to the Stan Kenton orchestra where he was an arranger and played alto sax. Fred Daly Chino Hills
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2005
As I read Susan King's article about Clint Eastwood's affinity for using previous collaborators ["Old Pros Backing Up the Old Pro," Feb. 27], I kept waiting for the name of Lennie Niehaus to come up and it never did. Going back as far as "Pale Rider," Niehaus has either composed or directed the music for many of Eastwood's movies. Though the music for the last two ("Mystic River" and "Million Dollar Baby") was written by Eastwood, it was still directed by Niehaus, whose music goes all the way back to the Stan Kenton orchestra where he was an arranger and played alto sax. Fred Daly Chino Hills
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On some level, Lennie Niehaus leads what might seem like a dual life. He is a saxophonist whose resume includes work with Stan Kenton and who has played with his own groups in recent years. But on a more public scale, he is the right-hand music man for Clint Eastwood, having scored Eastwood-directed films from "Tightrope," in 1984, through the current "Space Cowboys."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 2000 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
On some level, Lennie Niehaus leads what might seem like a dual life. He is a saxophonist whose resume includes work with Stan Kenton and who has played with his own groups in recent years. But on a more public scale, he is the right-hand music man for Clint Eastwood, having scored Eastwood-directed films from "Tightrope," in 1984, through the current "Space Cowboys."
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
"The first time I heard Charlie Parker," says Clint Eastwood, "I was overwhelmed. Living in the Bay Area, I had been following the big resurgence of traditional jazz--Lu Watters, Bob Scobey, Kid Ory and all that--but hearing Bird, even though I couldn't understand him at first, really turned me around."
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
When Clint Eastwood handed Lennie Niehaus the script of "Bird" to read early last year, Niehaus embarked on the artistic adventure of his career. "It's been the musical thrill of my life," said the 59-year-old composer-arranger-altoist of his work as musical supervisor on "Bird," the Eastwood produced-and-directed film about the legendary alto player Charlie Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 7, 2005
Trumpeters Jack Sheldon and Buddy Childers, singer Diane Schuur and composer/arranger Lennie Niehaus are among those who will be honored at the Los Angeles Jazz Society's annual tribute awards dinner and concert on Nov. 6 at the Biltmore Hotel in downtown L.A. The event, at which the honorees also are scheduled to perform, helps raise money for the organization's educational and scholarship programs. Information: (310) 491-1401.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
Five high school jazz orchestras from the Los Angeles Unified School District will be featured in a half-hour television show Thursday at 8 p.m. on KLCS Channel 58. "Top Five Jazz Bands 1988," emceed by actress Marla Gibbs, was produced by Ralph Jungheim under the auspices of Performing Tree, an arts education organization.
NEWS
November 19, 1995 | Leonard Feather
This 1994 cable movie is the rare exception to the rule that films about jazz have maintained a low level of authenticity through the years. Even so, it could have been dismissed as just another disease-of-the-week melodrama, but the relationship between a saxophonist (Jeff Goldblum, left) and a trumpeter (Forest Whitaker) is warmly convincing, thanks to the script by director Michael Elias. They work together on everything from jazz gigs to bar mitzvahs and baroque dates.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 19, 1990 | Leonard Feather
Niehaus, the respected movie music writer who first gained a name as a jazzman, took his alto sax out of mothballs for this, his first blowing date since the '50s. Of his seven originals, three were heard briefly in his score for Clint Eastwood's "Bird." Teamed with Bill Perkins on various saxes, Niehaus offers good, healthy, updated bebop, with a few arranging touches that avoid the rut of convention. Fine piano, too, by Frank Strazzeri.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 22, 1988 | ZAN STEWART
When Clint Eastwood handed Lennie Niehaus the script of "Bird" to read early last year, Niehaus embarked on the artistic adventure of his career. "It's been the musical thrill of my life," said the 59-year-old composer-arranger-altoist of his work as musical supervisor on "Bird," the Eastwood produced-and-directed film about the legendary alto player Charlie Parker.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 1987 | LEONARD FEATHER
"The first time I heard Charlie Parker," says Clint Eastwood, "I was overwhelmed. Living in the Bay Area, I had been following the big resurgence of traditional jazz--Lu Watters, Bob Scobey, Kid Ory and all that--but hearing Bird, even though I couldn't understand him at first, really turned me around."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 11, 1998
The veteran Mexican sextet Los Tigres del Norte has been the undisputed master of norten~o music for years, building a massive following in its home country. The group plays a rare small-hall show as part of UCLA's summer-long "Corridos Sin Fronteras" festival. * Los Tigres del Norte, Royce Hall, UCLA campus, 505 Hilgard Ave., Westwood. $20-$125. (310) 825-2101.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1989 | DON HECKMAN
Tenor saxophonist Ira Schulman has an idea: revive the small group, West Coast jazz music of the '50s and '60s with the same kind of enthusiasm and affection that musical archivists generally reserve for New Orleans jazz. Sunday afternoon, in working at the newly opened Improv in Santa Monica, he put it into effect.
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