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March 5, 1990 | From United Press International
Army troops in the troubled independent black homeland of Ciskei seized power in a bloodless coup before dawn Sunday, toppling President Lennox Sebe in a backlash over corruption and human rights abuses, the coup leader announced.
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NEWS
March 5, 1990 | From United Press International
Army troops in the troubled independent black homeland of Ciskei seized power in a bloodless coup before dawn Sunday, toppling President Lennox Sebe in a backlash over corruption and human rights abuses, the coup leader announced.
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NEWS
February 24, 1987
Police in the Transkei black homeland of South Africa have freed a French news agency reporter three days after he was arrested while reporting on an attack on the residence of President Lennox Sebe of the neighboring homeland of Ciskei. Officials there blamed the attack on Transkei. Agence France-Presse said that reporter Graham Brown, 39, was released after the South African government intervened.
NEWS
February 20, 1987 | Associated Press
Security forces in the black homeland of Ciskei repulsed an attack Thursday on the president's house by soldiers from a rival homeland who sought to take the leader hostage, Ciskei officials said. President Lennox Sebe and his family were not hurt, the officials said. Ciskei government spokesman Headman Somtunzi said guards killed one of the 25 attackers, wounded another and captured one of their leaders.
NEWS
September 27, 1986 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Heavily armed white commandos stormed a prison in the black tribal homeland of Ciskei early Friday and freed the former head of its security services, who had been jailed by the Ciskei president--his half-brother--after an attempted coup three years ago. Half an hour later, other commandos abducted the president's son, who commands an elite brigade of palace guard troops and who is seen as his father's preferred successor, outside a casino near King William's Town. The freed man--Gen.
NEWS
May 12, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The former president of Transkei, one of South Africa's nominally independent tribal homelands, was banished Monday to a remote village by his brother, the Transkei prime minister, in an apparent attempt to prevent his political comeback and perhaps a coup d'etat. Kaiser D. Matanzima, 71, the former president, who had led Transkei to "independence" from South Africa in 1976, was ordered to leave the capital of Umtata and not go beyond the district surrounding his home village of Qamata.
NEWS
September 26, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
White men armed with machine guns today climbed over the walls of a prison in the Ciskei black homeland and freed Charles Sebe, the homeland's flamboyant former military chief. The men, numbering four or five, shot one black prison warden on their way to Sebe's cell, said Headman Sontunzi, the Ciskei government's director of communications. They used rope ladders to scale the prison walls, he said.
NEWS
March 6, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
South Africa dispatched troops Monday to restore order in the black homeland of Ciskei, where a popular military coup d'etat has touched off two days of widespread looting and rioting in the streets. Mobs moved through townships in the nominally independent homeland, burning shopping centers, government offices and houses and stealing everything from television sets to washing machines. Dozens were reported injured. The 37-year-old coup leader, Army Brig. Gen.
NEWS
March 8, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the week's second major outbreak of violence in South Africa's black-ruled territories, Bophuthatswana police Wednesday fired on thousands of protesters demanding the resignation of homeland leader Lucas Lawrence Mangope. At least seven people died, and more than 450 were injured.
NEWS
August 18, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
President Pieter W. Botha's speech last week, committing his government to negotiations with black leaders on South Africa's future but containing no announcement of specific reforms, is now seen here as an extraordinary public relations failure, and the search is on for someone to blame. Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha, whose activities in advance of the speech raised high expectations for it, is the likeliest scapegoat. Foreign Minister Botha's talks with U.S.
NEWS
August 17, 1985 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Bishop Desmond Tutu said Friday that "the chances for peaceful change in South Africa now are virtually nil" because of President Pieter W. Botha's failure to pledge an end to apartheid and to launch the sweeping political, economic and social reforms that might halt the continuing civil unrest here. Tutu, the Anglican bishop of Johannesburg and the 1984 Nobel Peace laureate, gave his most pessimistic appraisal ever of his nation's future. "I'm scared.
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