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Lenny Dykstra

SPORTS
October 22, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN
It was one of the big performances in World Series history, but it was lost amid the midnight madness of Game 4, a footnote as the Toronto Blue Jays thundered back to beat the Philadelphia Phillies, 15-14, Wednesday. Lenny Dykstra homered twice, doubled, walked, drove in four runs and scored a record tying four. Some footnote, but nothing compared to what he did Thursday night when he went hitless in Game 5.
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SPORTS
October 18, 1993 | JIM MURRAY
The ballplayers call him "Nails." Probably because they think he chews them. He's a piece of work. He drives too fast, drinks too much, does everything on the run. Nobody ever saw him standing still. I don't think he sleeps. He's the nearest thing to Pete Rose in the game today. He even bets. His specialty is winning. He doesn't worry much about how he does it. He worries less about his image than a prowling leopard. He plays the game on the dead run. He has crashed into more walls than A.J.
SPORTS
September 29, 1993 | ROSS NEWHAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lenny Dykstra was determined to have an "in your face" season. If the gambling, the car wreck, the injuries of the last two seasons had distorted perceptions of who he is and where he was headed, he was determined to "put the focus where it belongs." Well, dude, as Dykstra would say, the Philadelphia Phillies' leadoff hitter and center fielder has done that and more. "If you took Lenny out of our lineup, we'd be battling the New York Mets," teammate John Kruk said.
SPORTS
December 29, 1992 | From Associated Press
Lenny Dykstra acknowledged he gambles legally in Atlantic City, N.J., but disputed a magazine account that he lost $50,000 at baccarat and had to be restrained from attacking another casino customer. Dykstra, who in 1991 was placed on probation for one year by baseball after testifying about his participation in high-stakes poker games, called the Philadelphia Magazine report "far-fetched." "It's making me out to be somebody that I'm not," Dykstra told the Philadelphia Daily News.
SPORTS
August 31, 1991
If Lenny Dykstra feels that being late for spring training means that he is not obligated to stop for children crossing intersections (Newswire, Aug. 23), let us fervently hope that, if the Phillies are ever fortunate enough to make it to the World Series, Mr. Dykstra sets his alarm clock and is sober enough to hear it. JIM STEIN Marina del Rey
SPORTS
August 30, 1991 | Associated Press
The outfield walls at Cincinnati's Riverfront Stadium will be padded next year, the city and the Reds agreed, ending a controversy started by Lenny Dykstra's season-ending injury. The city, which operates the stadium, and the Reds were criticized after Dykstra suffered a broken collarbone by running into the unpadded wall Monday night. The plywood walls have never been padded during the stadium's 21 years, one of only four NL stadium without such protection for outfielders.
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