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Lenny

ENTERTAINMENT
August 30, 1999 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Home Box Office collected the most honors at Saturday's nighttime Emmy Awards presentation in Pasadena, including multiple statuettes for dramatic series "The Sopranos" and its movies "The Rat Pack" and "Winchell." Saturday's nontelevised event encompassed more than 50 categories, primarily in technical areas such as cinematography, editing and sound. An additional 27 awards, recognizing programs and performers, will be presented Sept. 12 and televised on Fox.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 25, 1990
Re "The Diceman Taps Into a Primal Howl" by Lawrence Christon, Aug. 20: To name some of Andrew Dice Clay's antecedents and omit Lenny Bruce, the vulgarian's vulgarian, is an egregious oversight. This is the guy whose "sacrifices" made the entertainment world safe for (to use Christon's words) the "vile, crude, misogynistic, racist, homophobic," etc. Had Bruce lived, he'd be right there with Clay, stamping around in his own stercoraceous metier, giving him a downhill run for the money.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 13, 1998
I can understand why Robin Williams likes Eddie Izzard so much ("Allow Him to Digress," by Paul Brownfield, Sept. 6). Izzard's Engelbert Humperdinck bit is straight out of Lenny Bruce's routine about two agents watching a guy painting their office and wondering if they could make him a star. His name is Adolf Schickelgruber and Lenny, doing all of the voices with a German accent, riffs on making the name more acceptable for show business: "Adolf Schickel, Adolf Gruber, Adolf Hittel, Adolf Hit . . . Hit . . . Hitler.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1993
As assistant director of publications for the music publishing firm of G. Schirmer in New York City from 1960 through 1963, I had occasion to personally work with Leonard Bernstein. I can categorically state to Avik Gilboa (Letters, Jan. 17) that Bernstein did not like to be called "Lenny" and only tolerated it from some of his older associates and peers such as Aaron Copland. I can distinctly remember during one rehearsal Bernstein had with the New York Philharmonic where he blew up and immediately chastised one of the players who had called him Lenny, demanding a little more respect and to be referred to only as either Leonard, or Maestro.
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