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BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is searching for a better way for millions of diabetics to manage their disease by developing a contact lens that monitors glucose levels in tears. The contact lenses are the latest project from Google's secretive X lab that also came up with the driverless car, the Internet-connected eyewear Glass, and Project Loon, which is using balloons to bring the Internet to far-flung places. The "smart" contact lens uses a tiny wireless chip and miniature glucose sensor that is folded into two layers of soft contact lens material.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
TEMPE, Ariz. - Chris Iannetta looked over to the dugout for the sign. The Angels catcher could see a hand with wiggling fingers, but he struggled to count the number of fingers. "I couldn't tell between two and three," he said. That is worrisome enough for anyone and quite the occupational hazard when your job involves catching and hitting baseballs at speeds approaching 100 mph. Iannetta struggled last summer to keep his batting average above the Mendoza Line. "I felt out of shape," he said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 25, 2003 | David C. Nichols
Mordant, up-to-the-minute wit fuels "City of the Future," scampering about the Groundlings Theater. This latest showcase from Los Angeles' celebrated comedy troupe is consistently twisted and often uproarious. One factor is director Patrick Bristow's swift deployment of his gonzo ensemble. These writer-performers (with alternates) scramble past the odd flat-footed bit or ad lib with patented ease. Their politically incorrect energy carries the evening, with an emphasis on grotesquerie.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is searching for a better way for millions of diabetics to manage their disease by developing a contact lens that monitors glucose levels in tears. The contact lenses are the latest project from Google's secretive X lab that also came up with the driverless car, the Internet-connected eyewear Glass, and Project Loon, which is using balloons to bring the Internet to far-flung places. The "smart" contact lens uses a tiny wireless chip and miniature glucose sensor that is folded into two layers of soft contact lens material.
IMAGE
April 29, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
It's been a long time since wearing sunglasses was just about shading the eyes from the glare of the sun. Just as often, that pair of Wayfarers, cat-eyes or aviators is used to create an air of inaccessibility and mystery. That's especially true among the celebrity set seeking a disguise and rock musicians trying to cultivate an anti-establishment vibe behind impenetrably inky or mirrored lenses. But, thanks to the latest celebri-trend - custom-made, lightly tinted lenses in light neutrals or pale pops of color - sunglasses are no longer an accessory that looks cool at the beach or behind the wheel but affected indoors and elsewhere.
NEWS
November 20, 1990 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Since 1978, when he gave up his post-retirement gardening in Southern California to become a part-time "missionary doctor" in the rain forests of southeast Mexico, Dr. Theodore Whittington had made do without many essentials of his trade. Sterile needles, local anesthetics, baby incubators, even scalpels, were in short supply as the Welsh-born surgeon sought to carry out what he calls "God's work" at an eight-bed, makeshift hospital. Still, he worked with what he had.
HEALTH
October 28, 2002 | Valerie Reitman, Times Staff Writer
A new generation of recently approved contact lenses offer such a dramatic improvement in comfort, convenience and safety that some people are forgoing the popular laser eye surgery to correct their vision. Thanks to significant breakthroughs in lens materials, consumers can now safely wear contacts around-the-clock for up to 30 days, without the hassle of taking the lenses out at night, cleaning them and putting them back in the morning.
HEALTH
February 13, 2011
Why don't traditional corrective lenses slow myopia's progression much? Earl Smith, dean of the college of optometry at the University of Houston, has developed a theory. Glasses and contact lenses affect the image in the center of the eye. They do not address vision at the periphery. And, he said, "the peripheral retina ? because there's so much more of it ? can actually dominate the way that the eye grows. " Smith believes a process called "visual feedback" is contributing to the worsening of myopia in individuals who develop nearsightedness.
IMAGE
March 3, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
"It" bags and shoes of the season are a given. But let's talk gotta-have-it sunglasses, spring's must-have extra. More designers are parading a covetable lineup of sunnies down fashion runways. Some of the latest looks include large round and wrap styles, geometric shapes and oversized cat eyes with colored lenses and elaborate decoration. But our true style inspiration is British pop star Rita Ora, who has proved that a pair of charmingly offbeat sunglasses is not only wearable but can be a girl's best accessory.
HEALTH
August 10, 2009 | Roy M. Wallack
As night fell in Canmore, Canada, in July 2008, Downey's Tinker Juarez was well on his way to his second straight 24 Hours of Adrenalin solo mountain-bike world championship when he was felled by his only real rival: a piece of mud. Suddenly unable to see, his eye painfully swelling shut when he tried to remove the grit, the 1996 Olympian was forced to withdraw while he still led the race. "I'll have clear-lens glasses on next time," he said later. Sunglasses with interchangeable lenses -- full shades for bright sunlight, clear lenses for the dark and intermediate for in-between light -- are a must for long-distance runners, bikers, shooters and others who battle the elements day and night.
IMAGE
November 24, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt, This post has been corrected. Please see details below.
Look-at-me designer sunglasses have long been de rigueur in Hollywood, where the sun and the flash of paparazzi cameras shine bright. The latest "it" sunglasses, launching for winter, up the fashion ante even more with super-luxurious details and limited-edition runs. Karl Lagerfeld introduces the Chanel Eyewear Prestige Collection this month, with 18-karat yellow or white gold lenses as its signature. And only 30 people in the world will have the privilege of purchasing a $23,000 version of Cartier's iconic aviator sunglasses crafted of solid 18-karat gold with leather trim.
NEWS
October 28, 2013 | By Judi Dash
Lowepro's well-designed camera bags have evolved into multi-tasking adventure bags that carry much more than just a camera and its accessories. The new Nova Sport 35L AW holds a mother lode of gear. The weather-resistant shoulder bag measures about 16-by-11-by-12 inches, but weighs less than 3 pounds. Inside, modular, adjustable foam-padded compartments organize up to two full-size cameras with attached zoom lenses, two to four additional lenses, flash units, a tablet or laptop (up to 13-inch diameter)
BUSINESS
October 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Google Glass has been hogging the spotlight when it comes to eyewear, but get ready to see new technology designed for those stuck with old-fashioned prescription eyeglasses. About 64% of Americans wear glasses to improve vision. Many can't stand them, complaining that glasses are cumbersome, headache-inducing or don't work in all situations. Meanwhile, the growing amount of time people spend in front of computers and mobile devices has also raised concern about the potential damaging effects on eyesight.
SCIENCE
May 1, 2013 | By Amina Khan
Flies' multifaceted eyes have long allowed them to elude frustrated swatters from all directions. Now, inspired by insects' vision, researchers have built a digital camera with an array of tiny lenses lining a bulging eyeball, allowing an undistorted, nearly 180-degree view. The new camera, described in the journal Nature, could one day guide miniature spy planes, search-and-rescue vehicles and even endoscopic procedures.  All vertebrate animals (including humans) possess single-lens, rather flat eyes that are great at picking up light and offering high spatial resolution.
IMAGE
March 3, 2013 | By Ingrid Schmidt
"It" bags and shoes of the season are a given. But let's talk gotta-have-it sunglasses, spring's must-have extra. More designers are parading a covetable lineup of sunnies down fashion runways. Some of the latest looks include large round and wrap styles, geometric shapes and oversized cat eyes with colored lenses and elaborate decoration. But our true style inspiration is British pop star Rita Ora, who has proved that a pair of charmingly offbeat sunglasses is not only wearable but can be a girl's best accessory.
WORLD
October 29, 2012 | By Los Angeles Times staff
DAMASCUS, Syria - In retrospect, he realizes he shouldn't have gone back to the restaurant. But Wael Salahudeen had spent more than a month secretly filming around the Syrian capital, and he wasn't willing to let some of that footage go. He had just completed a particularly difficult shot of a several-story-tall poster of President Bashar Assad when he met a friend at the nearby restaurant. But when they left, he forgot the black bag he had altered with a hole through which he could inconspicuously film the streets of Damascus.
MAGAZINE
September 3, 2000 | DARCY RICE
From their earliest incarnations, sunglasses have been multifunction fashion accessories. Chinese judges in the 13th century even wore smoke-darkened quartz lenses to hide their eyes, lest their reactions give away what they thought of a witness' testimony. Mostly, though, dark glasses are meant to protect the eyes from the sun's harsh rays. Eye-care experts such as Dr. Charles Manger recommend wearing sunglasses whenever you're outdoors, even on cloudy days.
BUSINESS
October 13, 2011 | By Brandon Bailey
SAN JOSE, Calif. — If you're over 45 and wear glasses, you've probably got more than one pair. Or you're using bifocals or progressive lenses. As most people get older, their eyes have more trouble focusing on objects that are close, which is why you need that extra help for things like sewing, drawing — or reading this article. But it's a hassle to juggle multiple pairs of specs. And some wearers of traditional progressive lenses find their vision can be blurred or distorted in certain situations, such as when they look down at the ground.
IMAGE
April 29, 2012 | By Adam Tschorn, Los Angeles Times
It's been a long time since wearing sunglasses was just about shading the eyes from the glare of the sun. Just as often, that pair of Wayfarers, cat-eyes or aviators is used to create an air of inaccessibility and mystery. That's especially true among the celebrity set seeking a disguise and rock musicians trying to cultivate an anti-establishment vibe behind impenetrably inky or mirrored lenses. But, thanks to the latest celebri-trend - custom-made, lightly tinted lenses in light neutrals or pale pops of color - sunglasses are no longer an accessory that looks cool at the beach or behind the wheel but affected indoors and elsewhere.
HEALTH
November 28, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We rarely stop to think about it, but reading is an amazing accomplishment. It turns markings on a page or a screen into coherent thoughts. It's a complicated process: The eyes see a procession of letters, and the brain turns them into words. The reading process is challenging for people with dyslexia. The disorder isn't well understood, but there seems to be a communication breakdown between the eyes and the brain. Some people with dyslexia have trouble associating letters with sounds and words.
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